Search results for 'Jesse Bengson' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jesse Jon Bengson & Ali Mazaheri (2010). Trial-by-Trial Dynamics: A Window in Time. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4:199.score: 240.0
    Trial-by-Trial Dynamics: A Window in Time.
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  2. Matthew J. C. Crump, Elisabeth Bacon, Kylie J. Barnett, Paolo Bartolomeo, Melissa R. Beck, Jesse J. Bengson, Derek Besner, Victoria Bird, Sylvie Blairy & Sarah-Jayne Blakemore (2007). Cosmelli, Diego, 623 Costantini, Marcello, 229 Cressman, Erin K., 265. Consciousness and Cognition 16:1005-1006.score: 240.0
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  3. Jesse Bengson & Keith Hutchison (2007). Variability in Response Criteria Affects Estimates of Conscious Identification and Unconscious Semantic Priming☆. Consciousness and Cognition 16 (4):785-796.score: 240.0
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  4. John Bengson, Enrico Grube & Daniel Z. Korman (2011). A New Framework for Conceptualism. Noûs 45 (1):167 - 189.score: 30.0
    Conceptualism is the thesis that, for any perceptual experience E, (i) E has a Fregean proposition as its content and (ii) a subject of E must possess a concept for each item represented by E. We advance a framework within which conceptualism may be defended against its most serious objections (e.g., Richard Heck's argument from nonveridical experience). The framework is of independent interest for the philosophy of mind and epistemology given its implications for debates regarding transparency, relationalism and representationalism, demonstrative (...)
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  5. John Bengson & Marc A. Moffett (2007). Know-How and Concept Possession. Philosophical Studies 136 (1):31 - 57.score: 30.0
    We begin with a puzzle: why do some know-how attributions entail ability attributions while others do not? After rejecting the tempting response that know-how attributions are ambiguous, we argue that a satisfactory answer to the puzzle must acknowledge the connection between know-how and concept possession (specifically, reasonable conceptual mastery, or understanding). This connection appears at first to be grounded solely in the cognitive nature of certain activities. However, we show that, contra anti-intellectualists, the connection between know-how and concept possession can (...)
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  6. John Bengson, Marc A. Moffett & Jennifer C. Wright (2009). The Folk on Knowing How. Philosophical Studies 142 (3):387–401.score: 30.0
    It has been claimed that the attempt to analyze know-how in terms of propositional knowledge over-intellectualizes the mind. Exploiting the methods of so-called “experimental philosophy”, we show that the charge of over-intellectualization is baseless. Contra neo-Ryleans, who analyze know-how in terms of ability, the concrete-case judgments of ordinary folk are most consistent with the view that there exists a set of correct necessary and sufficient conditions for know-how that does not invoke ability, but rather a certain sort of propositional knowledge. (...)
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  7. John Bengson (2013). Experimental Attacks on Intuitions and Answers. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 86 (3):495-532.score: 30.0
  8. Jennifer Cole Wright & John Bengson (2009). Asymmetries in Judgments of Responsibility and Intentional Action. Mind and Language 24 (1):24-50.score: 30.0
    Abstract: Recent experimental research on the 'Knobe effect' suggests, somewhat surprisingly, that there is a bi-directional relation between attributions of intentional action and evaluative considerations. We defend a novel account of this phenomenon that exploits two factors: (i) an intuitive asymmetry in judgments of responsibility (e.g. praise/blame) and (ii) the fact that intentionality commonly connects the evaluative status of actions to the responsibility of actors. We present the results of several new studies that provide empirical evidence in support of this (...)
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  9. John Bengson (forthcoming). How Philosophers Use Intuition and 'Intuition'. Philosophical Studies.score: 30.0
    Herman Cappelen’s Philosophy Without Intuitions (hereafter ‘PWI’) is a novel study in philosophical sociology—or, as Cappelen at one point suggests, “intellectual anthropology” (96). Its target is the thesis that intuition is central, in the descriptive sense that contemporary analytic philosophers rely on intuitions for evidence— or, more generally, positive epistemic status. Cappelen labels the target thesis Centrality.
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  10. John Bengson & Marc A. Moffett (eds.) (2011). Knowing How: Essays on Knowledge, Mind, and Action. Oxford University Press, USA.score: 30.0
    This is the book on knowing how-an invaluable resource for philosophers, linguists, psychologists, and others concerned with knowledge, mind, and action.
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  11. John Bengson (2013). Knowledge How Vs. Knowledge That. In B. Kaldis (ed.), Encyclopedia for Philosophy and the Social Sciences. Sage.score: 30.0
    An overview of philosophical work on the distinction between knowledge how and knowledge that, focusing on what it means to say that they are 'distinct', and on what is at stake in the debate between intellectualists and anti-intellectualists about knowledge how.
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  12. Marc A. Moffett, Jennifer Cole Wright & John Bengson, The Folk on Know-How: Why Radical Intellectualism Does Not Over-Intellectualize.score: 30.0
    Philosophical discussion of the nature of know-how has focused on the relation between know-how and ability. Broadly speaking, neo-Ryleans attempt to identify know-how with a certain type of ability,1 while, traditionally, intellectualists attempt to reduce it to some form of propositional knowledge. For our purposes, however, this characterization of the debate is too crude. Instead, we prefer the following more explicit taxonomy. Anti-intellectualists, as we will use the term, maintain that knowing how to ? entails the ability to ?. Dispositionalists (...)
     
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  13. John Bengson (forthcoming). Grasping the Third Realm. Oxford Studies in Epistemology 5.score: 30.0
    Some things we can know just by thinking about them: for example, that identity is transitive, that Gettier’s Smith does not know that the man who will get the job has ten coins in his pockets, that the ratio between two and six holds also between one and three, that it is wrong to wantonly torture innocent sentient beings, and various other things that simply strikeus, intuitively, as true when we consider them. The question is how : how can we (...)
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  14. Jennifer G. Jesse (2011). Reflections on the Benefits and Risks of Interdisciplinary Study in Theology, Philosophy, and Literature. American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 32 (1):62 - 73.score: 30.0
    In recent years, multidisciplinary study has become all the rage in academic circles. Scholars have been going all out for interdisciplinarity, not only in research programs, but pedagogically in the classroom, and structurally in higher education curricula. Fewer and fewer cautionary voices are being heeded or even heard in this conversation. In this essay, I advocate a mediating position on this issue that has emerged from reflecting on my own professional work with interdisciplinary scholarship. That work includes research, scholarship, and (...)
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  15. John Bengson (2013). Presentation and Content A Critical Study of Susanna Siegel. The Contents of Visual Experience (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010). Noûs 47 (4):795-807.score: 30.0
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  16. Jolene Jesse (1997). Challenging Rational Explanations of Genocidal Killing and Altruism Hitler's Willing Executioners: Ordinary Germans and the Holocaust, Daniel Jonah Goldhagen,(New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1996), 656 Pp., $16.00 Paper, 640 Pp., $29.50 Cloth. Revolution and Genocide: On the Origins of the Armenian Genocide and the Holocaust, Robert Melson (Chicago: University of Chicago, 1992), 386 Pp., $16.95 Paper. The Heart of Altruism: Perceptions of a Common Humanity, Kristen Renwick Monroe (Princeton, NJ: Princeton ... [REVIEW] Ethics and International Affairs 11:302-307.score: 30.0
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  17. Eleanor L. Babco & Jolene Kay Jesse (2005). Employment in the Life Sciences: A Mixed Outlook. BioScience 55 (10):879.score: 30.0
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  18. Jolene Kay Jesse (2006). Redesigning Science: Recent Scholarship on Cultural Change, Gender, and Diversity. BioScience 56 (10):831.score: 30.0
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  19. M. Jesse (2006). The Cognitive Science of Souls: Clarifications and Extensions of the Evolutionary Model. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5).score: 30.0
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  20. John J. Obrycki, John E. Losey, Orley R. Taylor & Laura C. H. Jesse (2001). Transgenic Insecticidal Corn: Beyond Insecticidal Toxicity to Ecological Complexity Analysis of Transgenic Insecticidal Corn Developed for Lepidopteran Pests Reveals That the Potential Benefits of Crop Genetic Engineering for Insect Pest Management May Not Outweigh the Potential Ecological and Economic Risks. BioScience 51 (5):353-361.score: 30.0
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  21. Horst Jesse (1996). Christianity and Europe: The Legacy of Churches in Europe. The European Legacy 1 (4):1355-1360.score: 30.0
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  22. Jolene Jesse (1997). Challenging Rational Explanations of Genocidal Killing and Altruism Hitler's Willing Executioners: Ordinary Germans and the Holocaust, Daniel Jonah Goldhagen, (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1996), 656 Pp., $16.00 Paper, 640 Pp., $29.50 Cloth. Revolution and Genocide: On the Origins of the Armenian Genocide and the Holocaust, Robert Melson (Chicago: University of Chicago, 1992), 386 Pp., $16.95 Paper. The Heart of Altruism: Perceptions of a Common Humanity, Kristen Renwick Monroe (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1996), 320 Pp., $29.95 Cloth. Raoul Wallenberg, Revised Edition, Harvey Rosenfeld (New York: Holmes and Meier, 1995) 290 Pp., $19.95 Paper. [REVIEW] Ethics and International Affairs 11:302-307.score: 30.0
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  23. Horst Jesse (1997). Experience of Faith and Reality of Church in the Theological Thinking of A. F. C. Vilmar (1800–68). The European Legacy 2 (4):726-729.score: 30.0
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  24. Jolene Jesse (1997). The Haunted Land: Facing Europe's Ghosts After Communism, Tina Rosenberg (New York: Vintage, 1995) 437 Pp., $25.00 Cloth, $13.00 Paper. [REVIEW] Ethics and International Affairs 11:329-330.score: 30.0
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  25. John J. Obrycki, John E. Losey, Orley R. Taylor & Laura C. H. Jesse (2001). Transgenic Insecticidal Corn: Beyond Insecticidal Toxicity to Ecological Complexity. BioScience 51 (5):353.score: 30.0
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  26. Kleinman Arthur & Grayman Jesse (2005). Book Review: Forgotten Lunatics of the Great War. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 18 (3).score: 30.0
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  27. John Bengson & Marc A. Moffett (2011). Nonpropositional Intellectualism. In John Bengson & Marc A. Moffett (eds.), Knowing How: Essays on Knowledge, Mind, and Action. Oxford University Press. 161.score: 30.0
  28. John Bengson & Marc A. Moffett (2011). Two Conceptions of Mind and Action: Knowledge How and the Philosophical Theory of Intelligence. In John Bengson & Marc Moffett (eds.), Knowing How: Essays on Knowledge, Mind, and Action. Oxford University Press. 3.score: 30.0
     
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  29. Dominic W. Massaro & Jesse & Alexandra (2009). Audiovisual Speech Perception and Word Recogniton. In Gareth Gaskell (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Psycholinguistics. Oup Oxford.score: 30.0
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  30. Preston Jesse, Gray Kurt & M. Wegner Daniel (2006). The Godfather of Soul. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5).score: 30.0
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  31. E. Jesse (1998). The Two Major Instances of Totalitarianism: Observations on the Interconnection Between Soviet Communism and National Socialism. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 65:129-150.score: 30.0
     
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  32. Tanya de Villiers-Botha (2014). How Not to Be a Metaethical Naturalist –Jesse Prinz on the Emotional Construction of Morals. South African Journal of Philosophy 33 (2):145-154.score: 24.0
    Jesse Prinz develops a naturalistic metaethical theory with which he purports to sidestep ‘Hume's law’ by demonstrating how, on his theory, in describing what our moral beliefs commit us to we can determine what our moral obligations are. I aim to show that Prinz does not deliver on his prescriptive promise – he does not bridge the is–ought gap in any meaningful way. Given that Prinz goes on to argue that (1) his moral psychology highlights fundamental shortcomings in ‘traditional’ (...)
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  33. Wayne Wu (2013). The Conscious Brain: How Attention Engenders Experience, by Jesse Prinz. Mind 122 (488):1174-1180.score: 21.0
  34. Jesse Prinz (2009). The Emotional Construction of Morals • by Jesse Prinz: Summary. Analysis 69 (4).score: 18.0
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  35. Jonathan M. Weinberg, Daniel Yarlett, Michael Ramscar, Dan Ryder & Jesse J. Prinz (2003). Jesse J. Prinz,Furnishing the Mind: Concepts and Their Perceptual Basis. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 2002. [REVIEW] Metascience 12 (3):279-303.score: 18.0
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  36. Matthew Stuart Piper (forthcoming). The Conscious Brain: How Attention Engenders Experience by Jesse J. Prinz. Philosophical Psychology:1-5.score: 18.0
    The Conscious Brain: How Attention Engenders Experience by Jesse J. Prinz. . ???aop.label???. doi: 10.1080/09515089.2013.838829.
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  37. David Copp (2011). Jesse Prinz, The Emotional Construction of Morals (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007): Prinz's Subjectivist Moral Realism1. Noûs 45 (3):577-594.score: 15.0
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  38. Paul E. Griffiths (2008). Jesse Prinz Gut Reactions: A Perceptual Theory of Emotion. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 59 (3):559-567.score: 15.0
  39. Ronald de Sousa (2008). Review of Jesse Prinz, The Emotional Construction of Morals. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (6).score: 15.0
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  40. Susan Dwyer, How not to argue that morality isn't innate: Comments on Jesse Prinz's “is morality innate?”.score: 15.0
    We must admire the ambition of Prinz’s title question. But does he provide a convincing answer to it? Prinz’s own view of morality as “a byproduct – accidental or invented – of faculties that evolved for different purposes (1),” which appears to express a negative reply, does not receive much direct argument here. Rather, Prinz’s main aim is to try to show that the considerations he believes are typically presented by moral nativists are insufficient or inadequate to establish that morality (...)
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  41. Craig DeLancey (2005). Review of Jesse J. Prinz, Gut Reactions: A Perceptual Theory of Emotion. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (10).score: 15.0
  42. Brandon N. Towl (2003). Review of Jesse Prinz's Furnishing the Mind (Cambridge, Ma: Mit Press, 2002). [REVIEW] Brain and Mind 4 (3):395-398.score: 15.0
  43. R. Joyce (2009). Review: Jesse J. Prinz: The Emotional Construction of Morals. [REVIEW] Mind 118 (470):508-518.score: 15.0
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  44. Edouard Machery (2010). Reply to Barbara Malt and Jesse Prinz. Mind and Language 25 (5):634-646.score: 15.0
    In this response to Malt's and Prinz's commentaries, I argue that neo-empiricist hypotheses fail to threaten the argument for the elimination of ‘concept’ because they are unlikely to be true of all concepts, if they are true at all. I also defend the hypothesis that we possess bodies of knowledge retrieved by default from long-term memory, and I argue that prototypes, exemplars, and theories form genuinely distinct concepts.
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  45. Christopher Mole (2013). Review of Jesse J. Prinz, The Conscious Brain. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Phiilosophical Reviews.score: 15.0
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  46. Chung-ying Cheng (2008). Jesse Fleming (1953–2007). Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35 (1):189–189.score: 15.0
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  47. Paul Gelsinger & Adil E. Shamoo (2008). Eight Years After Jesse's Death, Are Human Research Subjects Any Safer? Hastings Center Report 38 (2):25-27.score: 15.0
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  48. J. Prinz (2009). The Emotional Construction of Morals * by Jesse Prinz * Oxford University Press, 2007. XII + 334 Pp. 25.00: Summary. [REVIEW] Analysis 69 (4):701-704.score: 15.0
  49. Christopher Arnold & H. Scott Fairley (1983). Book Review:Democracy and Distrust. John Hart Ely; Judicial Review and the National Political Process. Jesse H. Choper. [REVIEW] Ethics 93 (3):615-.score: 15.0
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  50. Ben Fraser (2012). Review: Jesse Prinz, The Emotional Construction of Morals (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2007), Pp. Ix +334. [REVIEW] Utilitas 24 (04):558-563.score: 15.0
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