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Jesse Preston [5]Jesse Lee Preston [1]
  1. Jesse Preston & Daniel M. Wegner, Attitudes and Social Cognition.
    The authors found that the feeling of authorship for mental actions such as solving problems is enhanced by effort cues experienced during mental activity; misattribution of effort cues resulted in inadvertent plagiarism. Pairs of participants took turns solving anagrams as they exerted effort on an unrelated task. People inadvertently plagiarized their partners’ answers more often when they experienced high incidental effort while working on the problem and reduced effort as the solution appeared. This result was found for efforts produced when (...)
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  2. Jesse Lee Preston, Ryan S. Ritter & Justin Hepler (2013). Neuroscience and the Soul: Competing Explanations for the Human Experience. Cognition 127 (1):31-37.
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  3. Jesse Preston & Daniel M. Wegner (2009). Elbow Grease: When Action Feels Like Work. In Ezequiel Morsella, John A. Bargh & Peter M. Gollwitzer (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Human Action. Oxford University Press. 569--586.
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  4. Jesse Preston & Daniel M. Wegner (2009). Phenomenal and Metacognitive. Elbow Grease: When Action Feels Like Work. In Ezequiel Morsella, John A. Bargh & Peter M. Gollwitzer (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Human Action. Oxford University Press.
     
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  5. Jesse Preston, Kurt Gray & Daniel M. Wegner (2006). The Godfather of Soul. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5):482-+.
    An important component of souls is the capacity for free will, as the origin of agency within an individual. Belief in souls arises in part from the experience of conscious will, a compelling feeling of personal causation that accompanies almost every action we take, and suggests that an immaterial self is in charge of the physical body.
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  6. Jesse Preston & Daniel M. Wegner (2005). Ideal Agency: The Perception of Self as an Origin of Action. In Abraham Tesser, Joanne V. Wood & Diederik A. Stapel (eds.), On Building, Defending and Regulating the Self: A Psychological Perspective. Psychology Press. 103--125.
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