Search results for 'Jessica A. Grahn' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  21
    Jessica A. Grahn (2012). Neural Mechanisms of Rhythm Perception: Current Findings and Future Perspectives. Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (4):585-606.
    Perception of temporal patterns is fundamental to normal hearing, speech, motor control, and music. Certain types of pattern understanding are unique to humans, such as musical rhythm. Although human responses to musical rhythm are universal, there is much we do not understand about how rhythm is processed in the brain. Here, I consider findings from research into basic timing mechanisms and models through to the neuroscience of rhythm and meter. A network of neural areas, including motor (...)
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  2.  1
    Jessica A. Grahn (2011). Advances in Neuroimaging Techniques: Implications for the Shared Syntactic Integration Resource Hypothesis. In Patrick Rebuschat, Martin Rohrmeier, John A. Hawkins & Ian Cross (eds.), Language and Music as Cognitive Systems. OUP Oxford 235.
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  3.  5
    Bruce A. Carnes, S. Jay Olshansky, Leonid Gavrilov, Natalia Gavrilova & Douglas Grahn (1998). Human Longevity: Nature Vs. Nurture--Fact or Fiction. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 42 (3):422-441.
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  4.  2
    C. J. K. Gibilisco (forthcoming). Lewis, Wilson, Hume: A Response to Jessica Wilson on Lewisian Plenitude and Hume’s Dictum. Inquiry:1-23.
    According to David Lewis’s Modal Realism, other possible worlds really exist as concrete, spatiotemporal systems, and every way that a world could be is a way that some world is. To establish this plenitude of concrete possible worlds, Lewis presents his ‘principle of recombination,’ which is meant to guarantee that there exists a possible world, or part of a possible world, for every possibility. Jessica Wilson has recently argued that Lewis’s principle of recombination fails to generate enough worlds to (...)
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  5.  2
    Thomas F. Glick (1997). Jessica A. Coope, The Martyrs of Córdoba: Community and Family Conflict in an Age of Mass Conversion. Lincoln, Nebr., and London: University of Nebraska Press, 1995. Pp. Xix, 113. $25. [REVIEW] Speculum 72 (1):134-135.
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  6.  77
    Richard Holton (2011). Response to 'Free Will as Advanced Action Control for Human Social Life and Culture' by Roy F. Baumeister, A. William Crescioni and Jessica L. Alquist. [REVIEW] Neuroethics 4 (1):13-16.
  7.  6
    Anne Phillips (2013). Inequality and Markets A Response to Jessica Flanigan. Political Theory 41 (1):151-155.
  8.  9
    Lester C. Olson (2000). A Reply to Jessica Benjamin. Philosophy and Rhetoric 33 (3):291-293.
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  9.  1
    David S. Areford (2011). Antoine de Schryver, The Prayer Book of Charles the Bold: A Study of a Flemish Masterpiece From the Burgundian Court. Trans. Jessica Berenbeim. Los Angeles: J. Paul Getty Museum, 2008. Pp. 310; 44 Color Plates, Many Black-and-White Figures, and Tables. $60. [REVIEW] Speculum 86 (2):548-550.
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  10. Jeffrey P. Fry (2007). 100 Heroes: People in Sports Who Make This a Better World. By Richard Lapchick, with Jessica Bartter, Jennifer Brenden, Stacy Martin, Drew Tyler, and Brian Wright. Published 2005 by NCAS Publishing, Orlando, FL. [REVIEW] Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 34 (2):211-213.
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  11.  30
    Justin Tiehen (forthcoming). Physicalism Requires Functionalism: A New Formulation and Defense of the Via Negativa. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research.
    How should ‘the physical’ be defined for the purpose of formulating physicalism? In this paper I defend a version of the via negativa according to which a property is physical just in case it is neither fundamentally mental nor possibly realized by a fundamentally mental property. The guiding idea is that physicalism requires functionalism, and thus that being a type identity theorist requires being a realizer-functionalist. In §1 I motivate my approach partly by arguing against Jessica Wilson’s no fundamental (...)
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  12.  14
    Jessica Richmond Moeller, Teresa H. Albanese, Kimberly Garchar, Julie M. Aultman, Steven Radwany & Dean Frate (2012). Functions and Outcomes of a Clinical Medical Ethics Committee: A Review of 100 Consults. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 24 (2):99-114.
    Abstract Context: Established in 1997, Summa Health System’s Medical Ethics Committee (EC) serves as an educational, supportive, and consultative resource to patients/families and providers, and serves to analyze, clarify, and ameliorate dilemmas in clinical care. In 2009 the EC conducted its 100th consult. In 2002 a Palliative Care Consult Service (PCCS) was established to provide supportive services for patients/families facing advanced illness; enhance clinical decision-making during crisis; and improve pain/symptom management. How these services affect one another has thus far been (...)
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  13.  5
    Jean Decety & Jessica A. Sommerville (2003). Shared Representations Between Self and Other: A Social Cognitive Neuroscience View. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (12):527-533.
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  14.  9
    Catherine E. Kerr, Jessica R. Shaw, Lisa A. Conboy, John M. Kelley, Eric Jacobson & Ted J. Kaptchuk (2011). Placebo Acupuncture as a Form of Ritual Touch Healing: A Neurophenomenological Model. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):784-791.
    Evidence that placebo acupuncture is an effective treatment for chronic pain presents a puzzle: how do placebo needles appearing to patients to penetrate the body, but instead sitting on the skin’s surface in the manner of a tactile stimulus, evoke a healing response? Previous accounts of ritual touch healing in which patients often described enhanced touch sensations suggest an embodied healing mechanism. In this qualitative study, we asked a subset of patients in a singleblind randomized trial in irritable bowel syndrome (...)
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  15.  7
    Jessica Ching-Sze Wang (2009). Reconstructing Deweyan Democratic Education for a Globalizing World. Educational Theory 59 (4):409-425.
    As democratic citizenship education gains importance worldwide, one wonders whether common civic education practices in the United States, such as mock elections, are adequate models for other countries, or whether they fall short of realizing the goal of promoting democracy in different regions and cultures. Despite various controversies, one fundamental question remains: How should we teach democracy? Should we teach it as a system of government or as a way of life? Jessica Ching‐Sze Wang finds inspiration in Dewey's (...)
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  16. Colleen M. Gallagher, Jeffrey S. Farroni, Jessica A. Moore, Joseph L. Nates & Maria A. Rodriguez (2015). The Misleading Vividness of a Physician Requesting Futile Treatment. American Journal of Bioethics 15 (8):52-53.
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  17. Jean Decety & Jessica A. Sommerville (2009). Action Representation as the Bedrock of Social Cognition: A Developmental Neuroscience Perspective. In Ezequiel Morsella, John A. Bargh & Peter M. Gollwitzer (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Human Action. Oxford University Press
  18.  58
    Stephen Biggs & Jessica M. Wilson (forthcoming). Carnap, the Necessary a Priori, and Metaphysical Anti-Realism. In Stephen Blatti & Sandra Lapointe (eds.), Ontology after Carnap.
    (August 2015 final pre-publication version!) In Meaning and Necessity (1947/1950), Carnap advances an intensional semantic framework on which modal claims are true in virtue of semantical rules alone, and so are a priori. In 'Empiricism, Semantics, and Ontology' (1950), Carnap advances an epistemic-ontological framework on which metaphysical claims are either trivial or meaningless, since lacking any means of substantive confirmation. Carnap carried out these projects two decades before Kripke influentially argued, in Naming and Necessity (1972/1980), that some modal claims are (...)
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  19. Mikkel Gerken (2007). A False Dilemma for Anti-Individualism. American Philosophical Quarterly 44 (4):329-42.
    It is often presupposed that an anti-individualist about representational mental states must choose between two accounts of no-reference cases. One option is said to be an ‘illusion of thought’ version according to which the subject in a no-reference case fails to think a first-order thought but rather has the illusion of having one. The other is a ‘descriptive’ version according to which one thinks an empty thought via a description. While this presupposition is not uncommon, it rarely surfaces in an (...)
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  20. Ted Parent (2015). Self‐Knowledge and Externalism About Empty Concepts. Analytic Philosophy 55 (3):158-168.
    Several authors have argued that, assuming we have apriori knowledge of our own thought-contents, semantic externalism implies that we can know apriori contingent facts about the empirical world. After presenting the argument, I shall respond by resisting the premise that an externalist can know apriori: If s/he has the concept water, then water exists. In particular, Boghossian's Dry Earth example suggests that such thought-experiments do not provide such apriori knowledge. Boghossian himself rejects the Dry Earth experiment, however, since it would (...)
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  21.  30
    Alfred Mele (2011). Surrounding Free Will: A Response to Baumeister, Crescioni, and Alquist. [REVIEW] Neuroethics 4 (1):25-29.
    This contribution to a symposium on an article by Roy Baumeister, A. William Crescioni, and Jessica Alquist focuses on a tension between compatibilist and incompatibilist elements in that article. In their discussion of people’s beliefs about free will, Baumeister et al. sometimes sound like incompatibilists; but in their presentation of their work on psychological processes of free will, they sound more like compatibilists than like incompatibilists. It is suggested that Baumeister and coauthors are attempting to study free will in (...)
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  22.  64
    D. B. Futter (2009). Shame as a Tool for Persuasion in Plato's Gorgias. Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (3):pp. 451-461.
    In gorgias, socrates stands accused of argumentative "foul play" involving manipulation by shame. Polus says that Socrates wins the fight with Gorgias by shaming him into the admission that "a rhetorician knows what is right . . . and would teach this to his pupils" . And later, when Polus himself has been "tied up" and "muzzled" , Callicles says that he was refuted only because he was ashamed to reveal his true convictions . These allegations, if justified, directly undermine (...)
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  23.  11
    Adam Sennet (2012). Context, Compositionality and Amity: A Response to Rett. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 42 (1):29-41.
    In an insightful and provocative paper, Jessica Rett (2006) claims that attempts to locate the (non-indexical, non-demonstrative) semantic contributions of context in syntax run into problems respecting compositionality. This is an especially biting problem for hidden indexical theorists such as Stanley (2000, 2002) who deploy hidden variables to provide a compositional theory of semantic interpretation. Fortunately for the hidden indexical theorists, her attack fails, albeit in interesting and subtle ways. The following paper is divided into four sections. Section I (...)
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  24.  43
    Asa Wikforss, Review of Jessica Brown, Anti-Individualism and Knowledge. [REVIEW]
    During the last decade Jessica Brown has been one of the main participants in the on-going debate over the compatibility of anti-individualism and self-knowledge. It is therefore of great interest that she is now publishing a book examining the various epistemological consequences of anti-individualism. The book is divided into three sections. The first discusses the question of whether a subject can have privileged access to her own thoughts, even if the content of her thoughts is construed anti-individualistically. This section (...)
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  25.  3
    Bruce Jennings (2011). Unreconcilable Differences?To the EditorTo the EditorTo the EditorTo the EditorCourtney S. Cox and Jessica C. Campbell Reply. Hastings Center Report 41 (4):4-5.
    To the Editor: The sensitive discussion by Courtney Campbell and Jessica Cox on hospice care and physician-assisted death (“Hospice and Physician-Assisted Death: Collaboration, Compliance, and Complicity,” September-October 2010) is a model blend of ethical analysis, empirical study, and policy assessment in bioethics. The legalization of physician aid in dying has raised important ethical issues for hospice that go to the broader question of its evolving mission and its place in the landscape of end-of-life care in our society. Hospice began, (...)
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  26. Renaud Boulanger (2015). Developing Global Health Programming: A Guidebook for Medical and Professional Schools. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 12 (1):147-149.
    Developing Global Health Programming: A Guidebook for Medical and Professional Schools , edited by Jessica Evert, Paul Drain, and Thomas Hall, is reviewed. In spite of some editorial shortcomings, the book is a terrific aggregation of resources and reflections on the state of global health education that leaves readers with a multitude of useful and diverse tools, as well as directions about where to find additional ones.
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  27. Albrecht Classen (ed.) (2010). Laughter in the Middle Ages and Early Modern Times: Epistemology of a Fundamental Human Behavior, its Meaning, and Consequences. Walter de Gruyter.
    Introduction: Laughter as an expression of human nature in the Middle Ages and the early modern period: literary, historical, theological, philosophical, and psychological reflections -- Judith Hagen. Laughter in Procopius's wars -- Livnat Holtzman. "Does God really laugh?": appropriate and inappropriate descriptions of God in Islamic traditionalist theology -- Daniel F. Pigg. Laughter in Beowulf: ambiguity, ambivalence, and group identity formation -- Mark Burde. The parodia sacra problem and medieval comic studies -- Olga V. Trokhimenko. Women's laughter and gender politics (...)
     
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  28. Jessica M. Wilson (2014). No Work for a Theory of Grounding. Inquiry 57 (5-6):535–579.
    It has recently been suggested that a distinctive metaphysical relation---"Grounding"---is ultimately at issue in contexts where some goings-on are said to hold "in virtue of"", be (constitutively) "metaphysically dependent on", or be "nothing over and above" some others (see Fine 2001, Schaffer 2009, and Rosen 2010). Grounding is supposed to do good work (better than merely modal notions, in particular) in illuminating metaphysical dependence. I argue that Grounding is also unsuited to do this work. To start, Grounding alone cannot do (...)
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  29.  19
    Roy F. Baumeister, A. William Crescioni & Jessica L. Alquist (2011). Further Thoughts on Counterfactuals, Compatibilism, Conceptual Mismatches, and Choices: Response to Commentaries. Neuroethics 4 (1):31-34.
    Further Thoughts on Counterfactuals, Compatibilism, Conceptual Mismatches, and Choices: Response to Commentaries Content Type Journal Article Pages 31-34 DOI 10.1007/s12152-010-9067-3 Authors Roy F. Baumeister, Department of Psychology, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL USA A. William Crescioni, Department of Psychology, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL USA Jessica L. Alquist, Department of Psychology, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL USA Journal Neuroethics Online ISSN 1874-5504 Print ISSN 1874-5490 Journal Volume Volume 4 Journal Issue Volume 4, Number 1.
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  30. Jessica M. Wilson (1999). How Superduper Does a Physicalist Supervenience Need to Be? Philosophical Quarterly 50 (194):33-52.
    Note: this is the first published presentation and defense of the 'proper subset strategy' for making sense of non-reductive physicalism or the associated notion of realization; this is sometimes, inaccurately, called "Shoemaker's subset strategy"; if people could either call it the 'subset strategy' or better yet, add my name to the mix I would appreciate it. Horgan claims that physicalism requires "superdupervenience" -- supervenience plus robust ontological explanation of the supervenient in terms of the base properties. I argue that (...)
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  31. Jessica M. Wilson (2013). A Determinable-Based Account of Metaphysical Indeterminacy. Inquiry 56 (4):359–385.
    Many phenomena appear to be indeterminate, including material macro-object boundaries, predicates or properties admitting of borderline cases, and certain open future claims. Here I provide an account of indeterminacy in metaphysical, rather than semantic or epistemic, terms. Previous such accounts have been "meta-level" accounts, taking metaphysical indeterminacy (MI) to involve its being indeterminate which of various determinate states of affairs obtain. On my alternative, "object-level" account, MI involves its being determinate (or just plain true) that an indeterminate (less than maximally (...)
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  32.  26
    Jessica Li & Shengli Fu (2012). A Systematic Approach to Engineering Ethics Education. Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (2):339-349.
    Engineering ethics education is a complex field characterized by dynamic topics and diverse students, which results in significant challenges for engineering ethics educators. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a systematic approach to determine what to teach and how to teach in an ethics curriculum. This is a topic that has not been adequately addressed in the engineering ethics literature. This systematic approach provides a method to: (1) develop a context-specific engineering ethics curriculum using the Delphi technique, a (...)
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  33.  94
    Azim F. Shariff, Jessica L. Tracy, Joey T. Cheng & Joseph Henrich (2010). Further Thoughts on the Evolution of Pride's Two Facets: A Response to Clark. Emotion Review 2 (4):399-400.
    In Clark’s thoughtful analysis of the evolution of the two facets of pride, he suggests that the concurrent existence of hubristic and authentic pride in humans represents a “persistence problem,” wherein the vestigial trait (hubristic pride) continues to exist alongside the derived trait (authentic pride). In our view, evidence for the two facets does not pose a persistence problem; rather, hubristic and authentic pride both likely evolved as higher-order cognitive emotions that solve uniquely human—but distinct— evolutionary problems. Instead of being (...)
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  34.  11
    Jessica L. Tracy, Azim F. Shariff & Joey T. Cheng (2010). A Naturalist's View of Pride. Emotion Review 2 (2):163-177.
    Although pride has been central to philosophical and religious discussions of emotion for thousands of years, it has largely been neglected by psychologists. However, in the past decade a growing body of psychological research on pride has emerged; new theory and findings suggest that pride is a psychologically important and evolutionarily adaptive emotion. In this article we review this accumulated body of research and argue for a naturalist account of pride, which presumes that pride emerged by way of natural selection. (...)
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  35.  55
    Jessica de Villiers, Robert J. Stainton & And Peter Szatmari (2007). Pragmatic Abilities in Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Case Study in Philosophy and the Empirical. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 31 (1):292–317.
    This article has two aims. The first is to introduce some novel data that highlight rather surprising pragmatic abilities in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The second is to consider a possible implication of these data for an emerging empirical methodology in philosophy of language and mind. In pursuing the first aim, we expect our main audience to be clinicians and linguists interested in pragmatics. It is when we turn to methodological issues that we hope to pique the interest of philosophers. (...)
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  36.  11
    Jessica Schluter, Sarah Winch, Kerri Holzhauser & Amanda Henderson (2008). Nurses' Moral Sensitivity and Hospital Ethical Climate: A Literature Review. Nursing Ethics 15 (3):304-321.
    Increased technological and pharmacological interventions in patient care when patient outcomes are uncertain have been linked to the escalation in moral and ethical dilemmas experienced by health care providers in acute care settings. Health care research has shown that facilities that are able to attract and retain nursing staff in a competitive environment and provide high quality care have the capacity for nurses to process and resolve moral and ethical dilemmas. This article reports on the findings of a systematic review (...)
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  37.  22
    Kyla Fisher, Jessica Geenen, Marie Jurcevic, Katya McClintock & Glynn Davis (2009). Applying Asset-Based Community Development as a Strategy for CSR: A Canadian Perspective on a Win–Win for Stakeholders and SMEs. Business Ethics 18 (1):66-82.
    In the December 2006 edition of Harvard Business Review , Michael Porter and Mark Kramer argue that by approaching corporate social responsibility (CSR) based on corporate priorities, strengths and abilities, firms can develop socially and fiscally responsible solutions to current CSR issues, which will provide operational and competitive advantages. We agree that an effective approach to CSR includes a mapping of strategy, risk and opportunity. However, we also caution that the identification of these to the exclusion of societal input may (...)
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  38.  20
    Jessica Keiser (2016). Bald-Faced Lies: How to Make a Move in a Language Game Without Making a Move in a Conversation. Philosophical Studies 173 (2):461-477.
    According to the naïve, pre-theoretic conception, lying seems to be characterized by the intent to deceive. However, certain kinds of bald-faced lies appear to be counterexamples to this view, and many philosophers have abandoned it as a result. I argue that this criticism of the naïve view is misplaced; bald-faced lies are not genuine instances of lying because they are not genuine instances of assertion. I present an additional consideration in favor of the naïve view, which is that abandoning it (...)
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  39.  34
    Jessica Flanigan (2014). A Defense of Compulsory Vaccination. HEC Forum 26 (1):5-25.
    Vaccine refusal harms and risks harming innocent bystanders. People are not entitled to harm innocents or to impose deadly risks on others, so in these cases there is nothing to be said for the right to refuse vaccination. Compulsory vaccination is therefore justified because non-vaccination can rightly be prohibited, just as other kinds of harmful and risky conduct are rightly prohibited. I develop an analogy to random gunfire to illustrate this point. Vaccine refusal, I argue, is morally similar to firing (...)
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  40.  1
    Géraldine Ruiz, Tenzin Wangmo, Patrick Mutzenberg, Jessica Sinclair & Bernice Simone Elger (2014). Understanding Death in Custody: A Case for a Comprehensive Definition. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (3):387-398.
    Prisoners sometimes die in prison, either due to natural illness, violence, suicide, or a result of imprisonment. The purpose of this study is to understand deaths in custody using qualitative methodology and to argue for a comprehensive definition of death in custody that acknowledges deaths related to the prison environment. Interviews were conducted with 33 experts, who primarily work as lawyers or forensic doctors with national and/or international organisations. Responses were coded and analysed qualitatively. Defining deaths in custody according to (...)
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  41.  79
    Jessica Carter (2008). Structuralism as a Philosophy of Mathematical Practice. Synthese 163 (2):119 - 131.
    This paper compares the statement ‘Mathematics is the study of structure’ with the actual practice of mathematics. We present two examples from contemporary mathematical practice where the notion of structure plays different roles. In the first case a structure is defined over a certain set. It is argued firstly that this set may not be regarded as a structure and secondly that what is important to mathematical practice is the relation that exists between the structure and the set. In the (...)
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  42.  42
    Jessica Carter (2005). Individuation of Objects – a Problem for Structuralism? Synthese 143 (3):291 - 307.
    . This paper identifies two aspects of the structuralist position of S. Shapiro which are in conflict with the actual practice of mathematics. The first problem follows from Shapiros identification of isomorphic structures. Here I consider the so called K-group, as defined by A. Grothendieck in algebraic geometry, and a group which is isomorphic to the K-group, and I argue that these are not equal. The second problem concerns Shapiros claim that it is not possible to identify objects in a (...)
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  43.  86
    Jessica F. Leech (2010). 'Creationism' and the Contingent a Priori. Ratio 23 (2):168-183.
    Williamson (1986) presents a troublesome example of the contingent a priori ; troublesome, because it does not involve indexicals, and hence cannot be defused via the usual two-dimensional strategies. Here I explore how the example works, via an examination of crucial belief-forming method M, partly in response to Hawthorne (2002) and the questions there raised for 'hyperreliable' belief-forming methods. I suggest that, when used to form a belief, M does its special work through creating a verifying state of affairs which (...)
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  44.  5
    Ine Hoyweghen, Jessica Mesman, David Townend & Laurens Landeweerd (2015). Reflections on Different Governance Styles in Regulating Science: A Contribution to ‘Responsible Research and Innovation’. Life Sciences, Society and Policy 11 (1):1-22.
    In European science and technology policy, various styles have been developed and institutionalised to govern the ethical challenges of science and technology innovations. In this paper, we give an account of the most dominant styles of the past 30 years, particularly in Europe, seeking to show their specific merits and problems. We focus on three styles of governance: a technocratic style, an applied ethics style, and a public participation style. We discuss their merits and deficits, and use this analysis to (...)
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  45.  23
    Jessica Masty & Celia Fisher (2008). A Goodness-of-Fit Approach to Informed Consent for Pediatric Intervention Research. Ethics and Behavior 18 (2 & 3):139 – 160.
    As children and adolescents receive increased research attention, ethical issues related to obtaining informed consent for pediatric intervention research have come into greater focus. In this article, we conceptualize parent permission and child assent within a goodness-of-fit framework that encourages investigators to create consent procedures “fitted” to the research context, the child's cognitive and emotional maturity, and the family system. Drawing on relevant literature and a hypothetical case example, we highlight four factors investigators may consider when constructing consent procedures that (...)
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  46.  28
    Jessica S. Ancker & Annette Flanagin (2007). A Comparison of Conflict of Interest Policies at Peer-Reviewed Journals in Different Scientific Disciplines. Science and Engineering Ethics 13 (2):147-157.
    Scientific journals can promote ethical publication practices through policies on conflicts of interest. However, the prevalence of conflict of interest policies and the definition of conflict of interest appear to vary across scientific disciplines. This survey of high-impact, peer-reviewed journals in 12 different scientific disciplines was conducted to assess these variations. The survey identified published conflict of interest policies in 28 of 84 journals (33%). However, when representatives of 49 of the 84 journals (58%) completed a Web-based survey about journal (...)
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  47. Kyla Fisher, Jessica Geenen, Marie Jurcevic, Katya McClintock & Glynn Davis (2009). Applying Asset-Based Community Development as a Strategy for CSR: A Canadian Perspective on a Win-Win for Stakeholders and SMEs. Business Ethics: A European Review 18 (1):66-82.
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  48. Jessica Pepp (2012). Reference and Referring: A Framework. In William P. Kabasenche, Michael O'Rourke & Matthew H. Slater (eds.), Reference and Referring. MIT Press 1-32.
  49.  4
    Jessica Greenebaum (2004). It's a Dog's Life: Elevating Status From Pet to "Fur Baby" at Yappy Hour. Society and Animals 12 (2):117-135.
    Nonhuman animals always have played a significant role in people's lives. Lately, the technological and market economy has anthropomorphized dogs to human-like behavior, particularly to status of family member or child. This qualitative study expands upon the current studies on consumption and animals and society by exploring how human-canine relationships are anthropomorphized at the family excursion to "Yappy Hour" at Fido's Barkery. The type of person who attends Yappy Hour on a weekly basis has a unique and special type of (...)
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  50.  64
    Jessica M. Wilson (2009). Resemblance-Based Resources for Reductive Singularism (Or: How to Be a Humean Singularist About Causation). The Monist 92 (1):153-190.
    Hume argued that experience could not justify commonly held beliefs in singular causal effcacy, according to which individual or singular causes produce their effects or make their effects happen. Hume's discussion has been influential, as motivating the view that Causal reductionism (denying that causal efficacy is an irreducible feature of natural reality) requires Causal generalism (according to which causal relations are metaphysically constituted by patterns of events). Here I argue that causal reductionists---indeed, Hume himself---have previously unappreciated resources for making sense (...)
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