Search results for 'Jewish law Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. The Institute of Jewish Law & Bernard S. Jackson (1989). Jewish Law Annual (Vol 8). Routledge.score: 540.0
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  2. Elliot N. Dorff (2007). For the Love of God and People: A Philosophy of Jewish Law. The Jewish Publication Society.score: 161.0
    Bringing the topic down to earth -- The body of Jewish law : how Jewish law resembles other legal systems -- The covenantal soul of Jewish law : how Jewish law is unique -- Motivations to live by Jewish law -- Continuity and change in Jewish law -- The relationship of Jewish law to morality and theology -- Jewish law and custom -- Comparisons to the right and the left -- Applications of (...)
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  3. Elliot N. Dorff (2011). The Unfolding Tradition: Philosophies of Jewish Law. Aviv Press.score: 117.0
     
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  4. Isadore Twersky (1982). Studies in Jewish Law and Philosophy. Ktav Pub. House.score: 115.0
     
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  5. Louis Jacobs (2000). A Tree of Life: Diversity, Flexibility, and Creativity in Jewish Law. Littman Library of Jewish Civilization.score: 114.0
    This study of the Jewish legal system (the Halakhah) demonstrates that the law embraces every corner of life.
     
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  6. Jonathan Jacobs (2010). Law, Reason, and Morality in Medieval Jewish Philosophy: Saadia Gaon, Bahya Ibn Pakuda, and Moses Maimonides. OUP Oxford.score: 108.0
    The medieval Jewish philosophers Saadia Gaon, Bahya ibn Pakuda, and Moses Maimonides made significant contributions to moral philosophy in ways that remain relevant today. -/- Jonathan Jacobs explicates shared, general features of the thought of these thinkers and also highlights their distinctive contributions to understanding moral thought and moral life. The rationalism of these thinkers is a key to their views. They argued that seeking rational understanding of Torah>'s commandments and the created order is crucial to fulfilling the (...)
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  7. Moshe Koppel (1996). Meta-Halakhah: Logic, Intuition and the Unfolding of Jewish Law. Jason Aronson.score: 102.0
     
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  8. Seymour Siegel & Elliot Gertel (eds.) (1977). Conservative Judaism and Jewish Law. Distributed by Ktav.score: 102.0
     
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  9. David Novak (1998). Natural Law in Judaism. Cambridge University Press.score: 96.0
    This book breaks new ground in the study of Judaism, in philosophy, and in comparative ethics. It demonstrates that the assumption that Judaism has no natural law theory to speak of, held by the vast majority of scholars, is simply wrong. The book shows how natural law theory, using a variety of different terms for itself throughout the ages, has been a constant element in Jewish thought. The book sorts out the varieties of Jewish natural law theory, (...)
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  10. Eliezer Schweid (2008). The Philosophy of the Bible as Foundation of Jewish Culture. Academic Studies Press.score: 96.0
    Israeli philosopher and public intellectual Eliezer Schweid offers his own bold reading, breaking with old stereotypes and challenging todays readers--both ...
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  11. Daṿid Halivni (1986). Midrash, Mishnah, and Gemara: The Jewish Predilection for Justified Law. Harvard University Press.score: 96.0
    The initial impetus for writing this book was the desire to understand more fully and completely the contribution of the redactors of the Talmud, the Stammaim.
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  12. Rafael Chodos (1984). The Jewish Attitude Towards Justice and Law. Distributed by E.J. Brill Booksellers.score: 96.0
  13. Boaz Cohen (1957). Law and Ethics in the Light of the Jewish Tradition. New York.score: 96.0
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  14. Zeʹev W. Falk (1981). Law and Religion: The Jewish Experience. Mesharim Publishers.score: 96.0
     
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  15. Schalom Ben-Chorin (1972). Samuel K. Mirsky, Memorial Volume. Studies in Jewish Law, Philosophy, and Literature. Editor Gersion Appel, Associate Editors Morris Epstein, Hayim Leaf. Jerusalem 1970, Sura Institute for Research, Yeshiva University, New York, 283 Pp (Englisch); 309 Pp (Hebräisch). [REVIEW] Zeitschrift für Religions- Und Geistesgeschichte 24 (3):259-260.score: 90.0
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  16. Jacob Dolnitzky & Morris Casriel Katz (eds.) (1982). The Jacob Dolnitzky Memorial Volume: Studies in Jewish Law, Philosophy, Literature, and Language. Distributed by P. Feldheim.score: 90.0
     
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  17. Gyongyi Hegedus (2012). Jonathan Jacobs , Law, Reason, and Morality in Medieval Jewish Philosophy. Saadya Gaon, Bahya Ibn Pakuda, Moses Maimonides . Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 32 (6):481-484.score: 90.0
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  18. Jules L. Coleman & Scott Shapiro (eds.) (2002). The Oxford Handbook of Jurisprudence and Philosophy of Law. Oxford University Press.score: 88.0
    One of the first volumes in the new series of prestigious Oxford Handbooks, The Oxford Handbook of Jurisprudence and Philosophy of Law brings together specially commissioned essays by twenty-seven of the foremost legal theorists currently writing, to provide a state of the art overview of jurisprudential scholarship. Each author presents an account of the contending views and scholarly debates animating their field of enquiry as well as setting the agenda for further study. This landmark publication will be essential reading (...)
     
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  19. Jonathan A. Jacobs (2010). Law, Reason, and Morality in Medieval Jewish Philosophy: [Saadia Gaon, Bahya Ibn Pakuda, and Moses Maimonides]. Oxford University Press.score: 87.0
    Jon Jacobs emphasises their distinctive contributions, emphasises the shared rational emphasis of their approach to Torah, and draws out resonances with ...
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  20. Giuseppe Veltri (2009). Renaissance Philosophy in Jewish Garb: Foundations and Challenges in Judaism on the Eve of Modernity. Brill.score: 87.0
    Introduction: in search of a Jewish renaissance -- Jewish philosophy: humanist roots of a contradiction in terms -- The prophetic-poetic dimension of philosophy: the ars poetica and Immanuel of Rome -- Leone Ebreo's concept of Jewish philosophy -- Conceptions of history: Azariah de Rossi -- Scientific thought and the exegetical mind, with an essay on the life and works of Rabbi Judah Loew -- Mathematical and biblical exegesis: Jewish sources of Athanasius Kircher's musical (...)
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  21. Daniel H. Frank & Oliver Leaman (eds.) (2003). The Cambridge Companion to Medieval Jewish Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 87.0
    From the ninth to the fifteenth centuries Jewish thinkers living in Islamic and Christian lands philosophized about Judaism. Influenced first by Islamic theological speculation and the great philosophers of classical antiquity, and then in the late medieval period by Christian Scholasticism, Jewish philosophers and scientists reflected on the nature of language about God, the scope and limits of human understanding, the eternity or createdness of the world, prophecy and divine providence, the possibility of human freedom, and the relationship (...)
     
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  22. Michael Zank (2012). The Heteronomy of Modern Jewish Philosophy. Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 20 (1):99-134.score: 84.0
    Abstract Proceeding from Jewish philosophy's origins in the convergence and divergence of Greek and Jewish thought and the resulting possibilities of construing Judaism and philosophy as heterogeneous or homogeneous, and ranging across the three major “ages“ or linguistic matrices of Jewish philosophizing (Hellenistic, Judeo-Arabic, and Germanic), the essay describes Jewish philosophy as an unresolvable entanglement in a dialectic of heteronomy and autonomy.
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  23. Markus N. A. Bockmuehl (2000/2003). Jewish Law in Gentile Churches: Halakhah and the Beginning of Christian Public Ethics. Baker Academic.score: 84.0
    Halakhah and ethics in the Jesus tradition -- Matthew's divorce texts in the light of pre-rabbinic Jewish law -- Let the dead bury their dead : Jesus and the law revisited -- James, Israel, and Antioch -- Natural law in Second Temple Judaism -- Natural law in the New Testament? -- The Noachide commandments and New Testament ethics -- The beginning of Christian public ethics : from Luke to Aristides and Diognetus -- Jewish and Christian public ethics in (...)
     
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  24. Lenn E. Goodman (2011). Jacobs , Jonathan . Law, Reason and Morality in Medieval Jewish Philosophy: Saadiah Gaon, Bahya Ibn Pakuda, and Moses Maimonides . Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010. Pp. 256. $99.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Ethics 121 (4):812-816.score: 81.0
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  25. Patrick Madigan (2012). Law, Reason, and Morality in Medieval Jewish Philosophy: Saadia Gaon, Bahya Ibn Pakuda, and Moses Maimonides. By Jonathan Jacobs. Pp. Xii, 232, Oxford University Press, 2010, £50.00. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 53 (4):711-711.score: 81.0
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  26. Joshua Parens (forthcoming). Law, Reason, and Morality in Medieval Jewish Philosophy: Saadia Gaon, Bahya Ibn Pakuda, and Moses Maimonides, by Jonathan Jacobs. Mind:fzt099.score: 81.0
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  27. David Noval (2011). Natural Law and Jewish Philosophy. In Jonathan A. Jacobs (ed.), Judaic Sources and Western Thought: Jerusalem's Enduring Presence. Oxford University Press. 43--153.score: 81.0
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  28. Andrew Botterell (2013). Review of Douglas Husak, Philosophy of Criminal Law: Selected Essays. [REVIEW] University of Toronto Law Journal 63 (1):152-158.score: 79.0
    A review of Douglas Husak, Philosophy of Criminal Law: Selected Essays (Oxford University Press, 2010).
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  29. Antony Duff (ed.) (1998). Philosophy and the Criminal Law: Principle and Critique. Cambridge University Press.score: 76.0
    Five pre-eminent legal theorists tackle a range of fundamental questions on the nature of the philosophy of criminal law. Their essays explore the extent to which and the ways in which our systems of criminal law can be seen as rational and principled. The essays discuss some of the principles by which, it is often thought, a system of law should be structured, and they ask whether our own systems are genuinely principled or riven by basic contradictions, reflecting deeper (...)
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  30. Michael S. Moore (1993). Act and Crime: The Philosophy of Action and its Implications for Criminal Law. Oxford University Press.score: 76.0
    This work provides, for the first time, a unified account of the theory of action presupposed by both British and American criminal law and its underlying morality. It defends the view that human actions are volitionally caused body movements. This theory illuminates three major problems in drafting and implementing criminal law--what the voluntary act requirement does and should require, what complex descriptions of actions prohibited by criminal codes both do and should require, and when the two actions are the "same" (...)
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  31. Jeffrie G. Murphy (1990). Philosophy of Law: An Introduction to Jurisprudence. Westview Press.score: 76.0
    In this revised edition, two distinguished philosophers have extended and strengthened the most authoritative text available on the philosophy of law and jurisprudence. While retaining their comprehensive coverage of classical and modern theory, Murphy and Coleman have added new discussions of the Critical Legal Studies movement and feminist jurisprudence, and they have strengthened their treatment of natural law theory, criminalization, and the law of torts. The chapter on law and economics remains the best short introduction to that difficult, controversial, (...)
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  32. John Finnis (2011). Philosophy of Law. Oxford University Press.score: 76.0
    This volume of his Collected Essays shows the full range and power of his contributions to the philosophy of law.
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  33. Jules L. Coleman (ed.) (1999). Readings in the Philosophy of Law. Garland Pub..score: 76.0
    An extraordinary collection of the finest essays in the core areas of legal philosophy, Readings in Philosophy of Law is a perfect introduction to the breadth of issues covered in the philosophy of law. The essays are all classic papers chosen as much for their clarity of thought and comprehensiveness as for their distinctiveness and importance to the subject matters of legal philosophy. This collection is ideal for the professional as well as the student, as it (...)
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  34. Lukas H. Meyer, Stanley L. Paulson & Thomas Winfried Menko Pogge (eds.) (2003). Rights, Culture, and the Law: Themes From the Legal and Political Philosophy of Joseph Raz. Oxford University Press.score: 76.0
    The volume brings together a collection of original papers on some of the main tenets of Joseph Raz's legal and political philosophy: Legal positivism and the nature of law, practical reason, authority, the value of equality, incommensurability, harm, group rights, and multiculturalism.
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  35. Mark Tebbit (2005). Philosophy of Law: An Introduction. Routledge.score: 76.0
    Philosophy of Law: An Introduction provides an ideal starting point for students of philosophy and law, assuming no prior knowledge of either subject. The book is structured around the key issues and themes in philosophy of law: * What is the law? - the major legal theories including realism, positivism and natural law * The reach of the law - authority, rights, liberty, privacy and tolerance * Criminal responsibility and punishment - legal defenses, crime, diminished responsibility and (...)
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  36. Dennis M. Patterson (ed.) (1996). A Companion to Philosophy of Law and Legal Theory. Blackwell Publishers.score: 76.0
    The articles in this new edition of A Companion to Philosophy of Law and Legal Theory have been updated throughout, and the addition of ten new articles ensures ...
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  37. Panu Minkkinen (1999). Thinking Without Desire: A First Philosophy of Law. Hart Pub..score: 76.0
    The response developed in this book is the creation of a metaphysical understanding of law or, in other words, what Aristotle called a 'first philosophy'.
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  38. Larry May & Jeff Brown (eds.) (2010). Philosophy of Law: Classic and Contemporary Readings. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 76.0
    Cottingham : Western philosophy : an anthology (second edition) -- Cahoone : from modernism to postmodernism : an anthology (expanded -- Second edition) -- Lafollette : ethics in practice : an anthology (third edition) -- Goodin and Pettit: contemporary political philosophy: an anthology (second -- Edition) -- Eze: african philosophy : an anthology -- McNeill and Feldman : continental philosophy : an anthology -- Kim and Sosa : metaphysics : an anthology -- Lycan and Prinz : (...)
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  39. Raymond Wacks (2006). Philosophy of Law: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press.score: 76.0
    This lively and accessible introduction to the social, moral, and cultural foundations of law takes a broad scope-- spanning philosophy, law, politics, and economics, and discussing a range of topics including women's rights, racism, the environment, and recent international issues such as the war in Iraq and the treatment of terror suspects. Revealing the intriguing and challenging nature of legal philosophy with clarity and enthusiasm, Raymond Wacks explores the notion of law and its role in our lives. Referring (...)
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  40. David Ingram (2006). Law: Key Concepts in Philosophy. Continuum.score: 76.0
    Clear, concise and comprehensive, this is the ideal introduction to the philosophy of law for those studying it for the first time.
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  41. Brian Bix (ed.) (2006). Philosophy of Law. Routledge.score: 76.0
    Edited by a leading scholar in the field, Philosophy of Law is a new title in the Routledge Major Works series Critical Concepts in Philosophy . It is a four-volume collection of canonical and cutting-edge research and covers a significant range of topics in the field. The first two volumes of the collection are devoted primarily to analytical legal theory—in particular, theories about the nature of law. This is the idea of legal philosophy most familiar to jurisprudential (...)
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  42. Andrei Marmor (ed.) (2011). The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Law. Routledge.score: 76.0
    The entirely new content has been written specifically for newcomers to the field, making the volume particularly useful for undergraduate and graduate courses in philosophy of law and related areas.
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  43. Ronald Dworkin (ed.) (1977). The Philosophy of Law. Oxford University Press.score: 76.0
    Echoing the debate about the nature of law that has dominated legal philosophy for several decades, this volume includes essays on the nature of law and on law not as it is but as it should be. Wherever possible, essays have been chosen that have provoked direct responses from other legal philosophers, and in two cases these responses are included. Contributors include H.L.A. Hart, R.M. Dworkin, Lord Patrick Devlin, John Rawls, J.J. Thomson, J. Finnis, and T.M. Scanlon.
     
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  44. John Keown & Robert P. George (eds.) (2013). Reason, Morality, and Law: The Philosophy of John Finnis. Oxford University Press.score: 76.0
    John Finnis is a pre-eminent legal, moral and political philosopher. This volume contains over 25 essays by leading international scholars of philosophy and law who critically engage with issues at the heart of Finnis's work.
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  45. Francis J. Mootz (ed.) (2009). On Philosophy in American Law. Cambridge University Press.score: 76.0
    Karl Llewellyn and the course of philosophy in American law -- Philosophical perspectives on law -- Areas of philosophy and their relationship to law -- Philosophical examinations of legal issues -- Law, rhetoric, and practice theory -- Commentaries-- Questioning the relationship between philosophy and American Law.
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  46. Fernando R. Tesón (1998). A Philosophy of International Law. Westview Press.score: 76.0
    Why should sovereign states obey international law? What compels them to owe allegiance to a higher set of rules when each country is its own law of the land? What is the basis of their obligations to each other? Conventional wisdom suggests that countries are too different from one another culturally to follow laws out of mere loyalty to each other or a set of shared moral values. Surely, the prevailing view holds, countries act simply out of self-interest, and they (...)
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  47. Charles Covell (1998). Kant and the Law of Peace: A Study in the Philosophy of International Law and International Relations. St. Martin's Press.score: 76.0
    Charles Covell examines the jurisprudential aspects of Kant's international thought, with particular reference to the argument of the treatise Perpetual Peace (1795). The book begins with a general outline of Kant's moral and political philosophy. In the discussion of Perpetual Peace that follows, it is explained how Kant saw law as providing the basis for peace among men and states in the international sphere, and how, in his exposition of the elements of the law of peace, Kant broke with (...)
     
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  48. John Deigh & David Dolinko (eds.) (2011). The Oxford Handbook of the Philosophy of the Criminal Law. Oxford University Press.score: 76.0
    This is the first comprehensive handbook in the philosophy of criminal law. It contains seventeen original essays by leading thinkers in the field and covers the field's major topics including limits to criminalization, obscenity and hate speech, blackmail, the law of rape, attempts, accomplice liability, causation, responsibility, justification and excuse, duress, provocation and self-defense, insanity, punishment, the death penalty, mercy, and preventive detention and other alternatives to punishment. It will be an invaluable resource for scholars and students whose research (...)
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  49. John Finnis (2011). Philosophy of Law: Collected Essays Volume Iv. Oup Oxford.score: 76.0
    John Finnis has been a central figure in the development of legal philosophy over the past half-century. This volume of his Collected Essays shows the full range and power of his contributions to core problems in the philosophy of law: the foundations of law's authority; legal reasoning; constitutional theory; and the logic of law-making.
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  50. Michael D. A. Freeman & Ross Harrison (eds.) (2007). Law and Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 76.0
    Current Legal Issues, like its sister volume Current Legal Problems, is based upon an annual colloquium held at University College London. Each year, leading scholars from around the world gather to discuss the relationship between law and another discipline of thought. Each colloqium examines how the external discipline is conceived in legal thought and argument, how the law is pictured in that discipline, and analyses points of controversy in the use, and abuse, of extra-legal arguments within legal theory and practice. (...)
     
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