Search results for 'Jewish law Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. The Institute of Jewish Law & Bernard S. Jackson (1989). Jewish Law Annual (Vol 8). Routledge.score: 1640.0
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  2. Elliot N. Dorff (2007). For the Love of God and People: A Philosophy of Jewish Law. The Jewish Publication Society.score: 657.0
    Bringing the topic down to earth -- The body of Jewish law : how Jewish law resembles other legal systems -- The covenantal soul of Jewish law : how Jewish law is unique -- Motivations to live by Jewish law -- Continuity and change in Jewish law -- The relationship of Jewish law to morality and theology -- Jewish law and custom -- Comparisons to the right and the left -- Applications of (...)
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  3. Isadore Twersky (1982). Studies in Jewish Law and Philosophy. Ktav Pub. House.score: 519.0
     
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  4. Jonathan Jacobs (2010). Law, Reason, and Morality in Medieval Jewish Philosophy: Saadia Gaon, Bahya Ibn Pakuda, and Moses Maimonides. OUP Oxford.score: 486.0
    The medieval Jewish philosophers Saadia Gaon, Bahya ibn Pakuda, and Moses Maimonides made significant contributions to moral philosophy in ways that remain relevant today. -/- Jonathan Jacobs explicates shared, general features of the thought of these thinkers and also highlights their distinctive contributions to understanding moral thought and moral life. The rationalism of these thinkers is a key to their views. They argued that seeking rational understanding of Torah>'s commandments and the created order is crucial to fulfilling the (...)
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  5. Elliot N. Dorff (2011). The Unfolding Tradition: Philosophies of Jewish Law. Aviv Press.score: 465.0
     
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  6. Schalom Ben-Chorin (1972). Samuel K. Mirsky, Memorial Volume. Studies in Jewish Law, Philosophy, and Literature. Editor Gersion Appel, Associate Editors Morris Epstein, Hayim Leaf. Jerusalem 1970, Sura Institute for Research, Yeshiva University, New York, 283 Pp (Englisch); 309 Pp (Hebräisch). [REVIEW] Zeitschrift für Religions- Und Geistesgeschichte 24 (3):259-260.score: 450.0
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  7. Jacob Dolnitzky & Morris Casriel Katz (eds.) (1982). The Jacob Dolnitzky Memorial Volume: Studies in Jewish Law, Philosophy, Literature, and Language. Distributed by P. Feldheim.score: 450.0
     
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  8. Gyongyi Hegedus (2012). Jonathan Jacobs , Law, Reason, and Morality in Medieval Jewish Philosophy. Saadya Gaon, Bahya Ibn Pakuda, Moses Maimonides . Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 32 (6):481-484.score: 432.0
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  9. Louis Jacobs (2000). A Tree of Life: Diversity, Flexibility, and Creativity in Jewish Law. Littman Library of Jewish Civilization.score: 426.0
    This study of the Jewish legal system (the Halakhah) demonstrates that the law embraces every corner of life.
     
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  10. Jonathan A. Jacobs (2010). Law, Reason, and Morality in Medieval Jewish Philosophy: [Saadia Gaon, Bahya Ibn Pakuda, and Moses Maimonides]. Oxford University Press.score: 423.0
    Jon Jacobs emphasises their distinctive contributions, emphasises the shared rational emphasis of their approach to Torah, and draws out resonances with ...
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  11. Lenn E. Goodman (2011). Jacobs , Jonathan . Law, Reason and Morality in Medieval Jewish Philosophy: Saadiah Gaon, Bahya Ibn Pakuda, and Moses Maimonides . Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010. Pp. 256. $99.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Ethics 121 (4):812-816.score: 405.0
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  12. Patrick Madigan (2012). Law, Reason, and Morality in Medieval Jewish Philosophy: Saadia Gaon, Bahya Ibn Pakuda, and Moses Maimonides. By Jonathan Jacobs. Pp. Xii, 232, Oxford University Press, 2010, £50.00. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 53 (4):711-711.score: 405.0
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  13. Joshua Parens (2013). Law, Reason, and Morality in Medieval Jewish Philosophy: Saadia Gaon, Bahya Ibn Pakuda, and Moses Maimonides, by Jonathan Jacobs. Mind 122 (488):1108-1112.score: 405.0
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  14. David Noval (2011). Natural Law and Jewish Philosophy. In Jonathan A. Jacobs (ed.), Judaic Sources and Western Thought: Jerusalem's Enduring Presence. Oxford University Press. 43--153.score: 405.0
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  15. Moshe Koppel (1996). Meta-Halakhah: Logic, Intuition and the Unfolding of Jewish Law. Jason Aronson.score: 390.0
     
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  16. Seymour Siegel & Elliot Gertel (eds.) (1977). Conservative Judaism and Jewish Law. Distributed by Ktav.score: 390.0
     
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  17. Eliezer Schweid (2008). The Philosophy of the Bible as Foundation of Jewish Culture. Academic Studies Press.score: 360.0
    Israeli philosopher and public intellectual Eliezer Schweid offers his own bold reading, breaking with old stereotypes and challenging todays readers--both ...
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  18. Daṿid Halivni (1986). Midrash, Mishnah, and Gemara: The Jewish Predilection for Justified Law. Harvard University Press.score: 360.0
    The initial impetus for writing this book was the desire to understand more fully and completely the contribution of the redactors of the Talmud, the Stammaim.
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  19. Rafael Chodos (1984). The Jewish Attitude Towards Justice and Law. Distributed by E.J. Brill Booksellers.score: 360.0
  20. Boaz Cohen (1957). Law and Ethics in the Light of the Jewish Tradition. New York.score: 360.0
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  21. Zeʹev W. Falk (1981). Law and Religion: The Jewish Experience. Mesharim Publishers.score: 360.0
     
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  22. Giuseppe Veltri (2009). Renaissance Philosophy in Jewish Garb: Foundations and Challenges in Judaism on the Eve of Modernity. Brill.score: 333.0
    Introduction: in search of a Jewish renaissance -- Jewish philosophy: humanist roots of a contradiction in terms -- The prophetic-poetic dimension of philosophy: the ars poetica and Immanuel of Rome -- Leone Ebreo's concept of Jewish philosophy -- Conceptions of history: Azariah de Rossi -- Scientific thought and the exegetical mind, with an essay on the life and works of Rabbi Judah Loew -- Mathematical and biblical exegesis: Jewish sources of Athanasius Kircher's musical (...)
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  23. Daniel H. Frank & Oliver Leaman (eds.) (2003). The Cambridge Companion to Medieval Jewish Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 333.0
    From the ninth to the fifteenth centuries Jewish thinkers living in Islamic and Christian lands philosophized about Judaism. Influenced first by Islamic theological speculation and the great philosophers of classical antiquity, and then in the late medieval period by Christian Scholasticism, Jewish philosophers and scientists reflected on the nature of language about God, the scope and limits of human understanding, the eternity or createdness of the world, prophecy and divine providence, the possibility of human freedom, and the relationship (...)
     
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  24. David Novak (1998). Natural Law in Judaism. Cambridge University Press.score: 306.0
    This book breaks new ground in the study of Judaism, in philosophy, and in comparative ethics. It demonstrates that the assumption that Judaism has no natural law theory to speak of, held by the vast majority of scholars, is simply wrong. The book shows how natural law theory, using a variety of different terms for itself throughout the ages, has been a constant element in Jewish thought. The book sorts out the varieties of Jewish natural law theory, (...)
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  25. Jacob Neusner (1997). The Intellectual Foundations of Christian and Jewish Discourse: The Philosophy of Religious Argument. Routledge.score: 273.0
    The Intellectual Foundations of Christian and Jewish Discourse is a unique and controversial analysis of the genesis and evolution of Judeo-Christian intellectual thought. Jacob Neusner and Bruce Chilton argue that the Judaic and Christian heirs of Scripture adopted, and adapted to their own purposes, Greek philosophical modes of thought, argument and science. Intellectual Foundations of Christian and Jewish Discourse explores how the earliest intellectuals of Christianity and Judaism shaped a tradition of articulated conflict and reasoned argument in the (...)
     
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  26. Stephen Benin (1999). A Hen Crowing Like a Cock: “Popular Religion” and Jewish Law. Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 8 (2):261-281.score: 246.0
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  27. Avraham Zuroff & Reuven Subar (eds.) (2008). Question Market: Relevant, Informative, and Thought-Provoking Answers to Contemporary Questions on Jewish Law, Customs, and Ethics. Distributed by Feldheim Publishers.score: 246.0
    Vol. 1. Contemporary issues -- Jewish philosophy -- Prayer -- Shabbat and festivals -- What we eat -- A question of ethics -- Lifecycles.
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  28. Norbert M. Samuelson (2001). Rethinking Ethics in the Light of Jewish Thought and the Life Sciences. Journal of Religious Ethics 29 (2):209 - 233.score: 243.0
    Judaism in the twentieth century began to return to its scriptural, communal roots after a centuries-long detour through Greek-influenced natural philosophy, a detour during which science and ethics were assumed to be partners and Jewish ethics drew heavily on natural philosophy and science. Twentieth-century philosophical ethics and science, particularly biological science, have developed in such a way as to make any continuation of that historical partnership problematic. This is not altogether regrettable because the problematizing of this long-standing (...)
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  29. David Hartman (2011). The God Who Hates Lies: Confronting and Rethinking Jewish Tradition. Jewish Lights Pub..score: 234.0
    Introduction: what planet are you from? A yeshiva boy's pilgrimage into philosophy, history, and reality -- 1. Halakhic spirituality: living in the presence of God -- 2. Toward a God-intoxicated halakha -- 3. Feminism and apologetics: lying in the presence of God -- 4. Biology or covenant? Conversion and the corrupting influence of gentile seed -- 5. Where did modern orthodoxy go wrong? The mistaken halakhic presumptions of Rabbi Soloveitchik -- 6. The God who hates lies: choosing life in (...)
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  30. Yeshayahu Leibowitz (1992). Judaism, Human Values, and the Jewish State. Harvard University Press.score: 225.0
    Together these essays constitute a comprehensive critique of Israeli society and politics and a probing diagnosis of the malaise that afflicts contemporary ...
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  31. Dov Schwartz (2007). Religion or Halakha: The Philosophy of Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik. Brill.score: 225.0
    The opening of Halakhic man : a covert dialogue with homo religiosus -- Homo religiosus: between religion and cognition -- The first paradigm of homo religiosus : Maimonides -- The second paradigm of homo religiosus : Kant -- Halakhic man as cognitive man -- The negation of metaphysics and of the messianic idea -- Mysticism, Kabbalah, and Hasidism -- Halakhic cognition and the norm -- Halakhic man's personality structure -- Religiosity after cognition : all-inclusive consciousness -- Myth as metaphor : (...)
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  32. Boaz Cohen (1959/1969). Law and Tradition in Judaism. New York, Ktav Pub. House.score: 225.0
    Boaz Cohen. sincere and great D'nan 'TD^n who do not approve of the policies or politics of their wilful and dominating leaders, but they are cowed into an undignified silence and submission, and are rendered impotent for salutary action.
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  33. Samuel Belkin (1958). The Philosophy of Purpose. New York, Yeshiva University.score: 225.0
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  34. Zeʹev W. Falk (1991). Religious Law and Ethics: Studies in Biblical and Rabbinical Theonomy. Mesharim Publishers.score: 225.0
     
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  35. Marvin Fox (ed.) (1975). Modern Jewish Ethics, Theory and Practice. Ohio State University Press.score: 225.0
     
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  36. Simon Greenberg (1977). The Ethical in the Jewish and American Heritage. Distributed by Ktav Pub. House.score: 225.0
     
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  37. Reinier Munk (1996). The Rationale of Halakhic Man: Joseph B. Soloveitchik's Conception of Jewish Thought. J.C. Gieben.score: 225.0
     
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  38. Dov Schwartz (2007). Religion or Halakha: The Philosophy of Rabbi Joseph B. Brill.score: 225.0
    The opening of Halakhic man : a covert dialogue with homo religiosus -- Homo religiosus: between religion and cognition -- The first paradigm of homo religiosus : Maimonides -- The second paradigm of homo religiosus : Kant -- Halakhic man as cognitive man -- The negation of metaphysics and of the messianic idea -- Mysticism, Kabbalah, and Hasidism -- Halakhic cognition and the norm -- Halakhic man's personality structure -- Religiosity after cognition : all-inclusive consciousness -- Myth as metaphor : (...)
     
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  39. Joseph Dov Soloveitchik (1986). The Halakhic Mind: An Essay on Jewish Tradition and Modern Thought. Distributed by the Free Press.score: 225.0
     
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  40. Markus N. A. Bockmuehl (2000/2003). Jewish Law in Gentile Churches: Halakhah and the Beginning of Christian Public Ethics. Baker Academic.score: 224.0
    Halakhah and ethics in the Jesus tradition -- Matthew's divorce texts in the light of pre-rabbinic Jewish law -- Let the dead bury their dead : Jesus and the law revisited -- James, Israel, and Antioch -- Natural law in Second Temple Judaism -- Natural law in the New Testament? -- The Noachide commandments and New Testament ethics -- The beginning of Christian public ethics : from Luke to Aristides and Diognetus -- Jewish and Christian public ethics in (...)
     
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  41. Jules L. Coleman & Scott Shapiro (eds.) (2002). The Oxford Handbook of Jurisprudence and Philosophy of Law. Oxford University Press.score: 224.0
    One of the first volumes in the new series of prestigious Oxford Handbooks, The Oxford Handbook of Jurisprudence and Philosophy of Law brings together specially commissioned essays by twenty-seven of the foremost legal theorists currently writing, to provide a state of the art overview of jurisprudential scholarship. Each author presents an account of the contending views and scholarly debates animating their field of enquiry as well as setting the agenda for further study. This landmark publication will be essential reading (...)
     
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  42. Michael A. Shmidman & Bernard Lander (eds.) (2007). Turim: Studies in Jewish History and Literature: Presented to Dr. Bernard Lander. Distributed by Ktav Pub..score: 219.0
    The Circumcision Controversy in Classical Reform in Historical Context Judith Bleich Toward the close of the nineteenth century, a gathering of rabbinic ...
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  43. David Novak (2011). The Image of the Non-Jew in Judaism: The Idea of Noahide Law. The Littman Library of Jewish Civilization.score: 219.0
     
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  44. David Shatz (2009). Jewish Thought in Dialogue: Essays on Thinkers, Theologies, and Moral Theories. Academic Studies Press.score: 219.0
     
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  45. Michael A. Shmidman & Bernard Lander (eds.) (2007). Turim: Studies in Jewish History and Literature: Presented to Dr. Distributed by Ktav Pub..score: 219.0
     
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  46. Michael Zank (2012). The Heteronomy of Modern Jewish Philosophy. Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 20 (1):99-134.score: 216.0
    Abstract Proceeding from Jewish philosophy's origins in the convergence and divergence of Greek and Jewish thought and the resulting possibilities of construing Judaism and philosophy as heterogeneous or homogeneous, and ranging across the three major “ages“ or linguistic matrices of Jewish philosophizing (Hellenistic, Judeo-Arabic, and Germanic), the essay describes Jewish philosophy as an unresolvable entanglement in a dialectic of heteronomy and autonomy.
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  47. Carlos Fraenkel (2010). Theocracy and Autonomy in Medieval Islamic and Jewish Philosophy. Political Theory 38 (3):340 - 366.score: 216.0
    According to both contemporary intuitions and scholarly opinion, autonomy is something specifically modern. It is certainly taken to be incompatible with religions like Islam and Judaism, if these are invested with political power. Both religions are seen as centered on a divine Law (sharî'a, viz., torah) which prescribes what we may and may not do, promising reward for obedience and threatening punishment for disobedience. Not we, but God makes the rules. This picture is in important ways misleading. There is, I (...)
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  48. David Novak (1996). Jewish Ethics and Natural Law. Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 5 (2):205-217.score: 216.0
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  49. Michael Mack (2001). The Metaphysics of Eating: Jewish Dietary Law and Hegel's Social Theory. Philosophy and Social Criticism 27 (5):59-88.score: 207.0
    This paper analyzes how 'Jewishness' functions as a scapegoat for the apparently unbridgeable gap between spirit and matter in Hegel's social and aesthetic theory. If Hegel accuses 'the Jews' and 'Judaism' of inhabiting a radical divide between the empirical and the spiritual - a divide that coincides with the one between body and body politic - he follows the trajectory of Kant's opposition between autonomy and heteronomy. Kant's notion of freedom describes reason's transcendence of the material world, but this state (...)
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  50. Andrew Botterell (2013). Review of Douglas Husak, Philosophy of Criminal Law: Selected Essays. [REVIEW] University of Toronto Law Journal 63 (1):152-158.score: 206.0
    A review of Douglas Husak, Philosophy of Criminal Law: Selected Essays (Oxford University Press, 2010).
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