Search results for 'Jewish scientists Intellectual life' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Claudia Ursutiu (2010). Leon Volovici – Istoric Al Vieţii Intelectuale Evreieşti Din România/ Leon Volovici - Historian of Jewish Cultural Life in Romania. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 7 (21):120-139.score: 121.5
    There are seminal works in historiography which, while significantly furthering our comprehension of a certain age or topic, have also the merit of opening new avenues for research. The books and studies of Professor Leon Volovici dedicated to modern anti-Semitism and Jewish cultural life in Romania do represent such fundamental works, bringing key contributions to the knowledge and understanding of intellectual anti-Semitism and the debates circumscribed to the Jewish-Romanian circles. The works dedicated to intellectual anti-Semitism (...)
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  2. Mary Jo Nye (2011). Michael Polanyi and His Generation: Origins of the Social Construction of Science. The University of Chicago Press.score: 102.0
    Scientific culture in Europe and the refugee generation -- Germany and Weimar Berlin as the City of Science -- Origins of a social perspective: doing physical chemistry in Weimar Berlin -- Chemical dynamics and social dynamics in Berlin and Manchester -- Liberalism and the economic foundations of the "Republic of Science" -- Scientific freedom and the social functions of science -- Political foundations of the philosophies of science of Popper, Kuhn, and Polanyi -- Personal knowledge: argument, audiences, and sociological engagement (...)
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  3. Steve Fuller (2009). The Sociology of Intellectual Life: The Career of the Mind in and Around the Academy. Sage.score: 81.0
    1. The Place of Intellectual Life: The University -- The University as an Institutional Solution to the Problem of Knowledge -- The Alienability of Knowledge in Our So-called Knowledge Society -- The Knowledge Society as Capitalism of the Third Order -- Will the University Survive the Era of Knowledge Management? -- Postmodernism as an Anti-university Movement -- Regaining the University's Critical Edge by Historicizing the Curriculum -- Affirmative Action as a Strategy for Redressing the Balance Between Research and (...)
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  4. Paul Steinberg (2003). Study Guide to Jewish Ethics: A Reader's Companion to Matters of Life and Death, to Do the Right and the Good, Love Your Neighbor and Yourself. The Jewish Publication Society.score: 75.0
    This companion to Elliot Dorff's three books on Jewish ethics -- Matters of Life and Death , To Do the Right and the Good , and Love Your Neighbor and Yourself -- is designed for group as well as individual study. Through suggested readings from Dorff's books, probing questions, lively discussion topics, and simple writing exercises, readers will be able to analyze and clarify their own positions on a host of controversial issues: sex, surrogate motherhood, adoption, family abuse, (...)
     
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  5. Kathryn Nixdorff (2013). Education for Life Scientists on the Dual-Use Implications of Their Research. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (4):1487-1490.score: 72.0
    Advances in the life sciences are occurring with extreme rapidity and accumulating a great deal of knowledge about life’s vital processes. While this knowledge is essential for fighting disease in a more effective way, it can also be misused either intentionally or inadvertently to develop novel and more effective biological weapons. For nearly a decade civil-academic society as well as States Parties to the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention have recognised the importance of dual-use biosecurity education for (...) scientists as a means to foster a culture of responsibility and prevent the potential misuse of advances in the life sciences for non-peaceful purposes. Nevertheless, the implementation of dual-use biosecurity education for life scientists has made little progress in institutions of higher learning. Professional societies and academic organizations have worked from the bottom-up in developing online dual-use biosecurity education modules that can be used for instruction. However, top-down help is needed from goverments if further progress is to be made in implementing biosecurity education for life scientists. (shrink)
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  6. S. Daniel Breslauer (2001). Creating a Judaism Without Religion: A Postmodern Jewish Possibility. University Press of America.score: 69.0
    Creative Betrayal: Hasidism, Israeli Writers, and Martin Buber Contemporary American Jews seem to have a strange attraction to an eighteenth century Jewish ...
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  7. Yissocher Frand (1999). Listen to Your Messages: And Other Observations on Contemporary Jewish Life. Mesorah.score: 63.0
    This is a book that will open eyes and penetrate hearts.
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  8. Simon Greenberg (1981). A Jewish Philosophy and Pattern of Life. Distributed by Ktav Publishing House.score: 63.0
     
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  9. Andrew E. Benjamin (1997). Present Hope: Philosophy, Architecture, Judaism. Routledge.score: 60.0
    Present Hope is a compelling exploration of how we think philosophically about the present. Andrew Benjamin considers examples in philosophy, architecture and poetry to illustrate crucial themes of loss, memory, tragedy, hope and modernity. The book uses the work of Walter Benjamin and Martin Heidegger to illustrate the ways the notion of hope was weaved into their philosophies. Andrew Benjamin maintains that hope is a vital part of the present, rather than an expression only of the future. Present Hope shows (...)
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  10. Daniel B. Schwartz (2012). The First Modern Jew: Spinoza and the History of an Image. Princeton University Press.score: 60.0
    Ex-Jew, eternal Jew: early representations of the Jewish Spinoza -- Refining Spinoza: Moses Mendelssohn's response to the Amsterdam heretic -- The first modern Jew: Berthold Auerbach's Spinoza and the beginnings of an image -- A rebel against the past, a revealer of secrets: Salomon Rubin and the east European Maskilic Spinoza -- From the heights of Mount Scopus: Yosef Klausner and the Zionist rehabilitation of Spinoza -- Farewell, Spinoza: I. B. Singer and the tragicomedy of the Jewish Spinozist.
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  11. Daniel S. Brenner (ed.) (2002). Embracing Life & Facing Death: A Jewish Guide to Palliative Care. Clal.score: 60.0
     
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  12. Job Y. Jindo (2012). Recontextualizing Kaufmann: His Empirical Conception of the Bible and Its Significance in Jewish Intellectual History. Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 19 (2):95-129.score: 57.0
    Abstract This essay revisits the significance of Kaufmann's Toledot ha-emunah ha-yisre'elit in Jewish intellectual history, as its reception has hitherto been somewhat reductive. His work is generally viewed as an anti-Christian (anti-Wellhausen) polemic with a Zionist agenda that sought to glorify the formative period of his people. A closer look at his intellectual background, as well as his theoretical framework, leads us to a different understanding of his work in general and of its alleged nationalistic features in (...)
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  13. Moses Mendelssohn (2012). Last Works. University of Illinois Press.score: 57.0
    Lessing's death in 1781 was a severe blow to Mendelssohn. Mendelssohn wrote his last two works to commemorate Lessing and to carry on the work to which they had dedicated much of their lives.
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  14. Gianluca Giannini (2004). Filosofia, Religione E Pensiero Ebraico: Dibattito E Prospettive Dal Nordamerica. Guida.score: 57.0
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  15. Shai Horev (2011). Tsiyoni U-Filosof: Hashḳafat ʻolamo U-Meḳomo Ha-Ideʼologi Shel Mordekhai Marṭin Buber, Hogeh Deʼot Tsiyoni, Mi-Yeme Ha-"Hitʼaḥdut" Li-"Berit Shalom". [REVIEW] Dukhifat.score: 57.0
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  16. Eliezer Schweid (2005). Masot Gordoniyot Ḥadashot: Humanizm, Globalizatsyah, Posṭ Modernizm Ṿeha-ʻam Ha-Yehudi. Hotsaʼat Ha-Ḳibuts Ha-MeʼUḥad.score: 57.0
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  17. Elliot N. Dorff (1998). Matters of Life and Death: A Jewish Approach to Modern Medical Ethics. Jewish Publication Society.score: 54.0
    In Matters of Life and Death Elliot Dorff thoroughly addresses this unavoidable confluence of medical technology and Jewish law and ethics.
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  18. Gregory B. Sadler (2001). Blondel's Conception of the Option Between Egoism and Charity and Its Consequences for Intellectual Life and Culture. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 75:171-181.score: 54.0
    In Maurice Blondel’s work, the problem of immortality is dealt with in terms of one’s resolution of the problem of human destiny articulated in the form of a self-determinative option. Although this option can take many determinate forms, it is ultimately one between egoism and selfishness or mortification and charity. In the course of this paper, I outline this opposition and indicate in particular how it bears on intellectual life and culture. For Blondel, the theoretical and the practical (...)
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  19. Yotam Hotam (2012). Modern Gnosis and Zionism: The Crisis of Culture, Life Philosophy and Jewish National Thought. Routledge.score: 54.0
    Germany, the crisis of culture and secular theology -- Life philosophy or modern gnosis -- Modern Jewish gnosis -- Modern gnosis and Zionist thought.
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  20. Louis Jacobs (2000). A Tree of Life: Diversity, Flexibility, and Creativity in Jewish Law. Littman Library of Jewish Civilization.score: 54.0
    This study of the Jewish legal system (the Halakhah) demonstrates that the law embraces every corner of life.
     
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  21. Jacob Neusner (1997). The Intellectual Foundations of Christian and Jewish Discourse: The Philosophy of Religious Argument. Routledge.score: 54.0
    The Intellectual Foundations of Christian and Jewish Discourse is a unique and controversial analysis of the genesis and evolution of Judeo-Christian intellectual thought. Jacob Neusner and Bruce Chilton argue that the Judaic and Christian heirs of Scripture adopted, and adapted to their own purposes, Greek philosophical modes of thought, argument and science. Intellectual Foundations of Christian and Jewish Discourse explores how the earliest intellectuals of Christianity and Judaism shaped a tradition of articulated conflict and reasoned (...)
     
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  22. Jacob Golomb (ed.) (1997). Nietzsche and Jewish Culture. Routledge.score: 48.0
    Friedrich Nietzsche occupies a contradictory position in the history of ideas: he came up with the concept of a master race, yet an eminent Jewish scholar like Martin Buber translated his Also sprach Zarathustra into Polish and remained in a lifelong intellectual dialogue with Nietzsche. Sigmund Freud admired his intellectual courage and was not at all reluctant to admit that Nietzsche had anticipated many of his basic ideas. This unique collection of essays explores the reciprocal relationship between (...)
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  23. Michael Gorman (2005). Intellectual Property Rights, Moral Imagination, and Access to Life-Enhancing Drugs. Business Ethics Quarterly 15 (4):595-613.score: 48.0
    Although the idea of intellectual property (IP) rights—proprietary rights to what one invents, writes, paints, composes or creates—is firmlyembedded in Western thinking, these rights are now being challenged across the globe in a number of areas. This paper will focus on one of these challenges: government-sanctioned copying of patented drugs without permission or license of the patent owner in the name of national security, in health emergencies, or life-threatening epidemics. After discussing standard rights-based and utilitarian arguments defending (...) property we will present another model. IP is almost always a result of a long history of scientific or technological development and numbers of networks of creativity, not the act of a single person or a group of people at one moment in time. Thus thinking about and evaluating IP requires thinking about IP as shared rights. A network approach to IP challenges a traditional model of IP. It follows that the owner of those rights has some obligations to share that information or its outcomes. If that conclusion is applied to the distribution of antiretroviral drugs, what pharmaceutical companies are ethically required to do to increase access to these medicines in the developing world will have to be reanalyzed from a more systemic perspective. (shrink)
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  24. Michiel Korthals (2003). Do We Need Berlin Walls or Chinese Walls Between Research, Public Consultation, and Advice? New Public Responsibilities for Life Scientists. Journal of Academic Ethics 1 (4):385-395.score: 48.0
    During the coming decades, life scientists will become involved more than ever in the public and private lives of patients and consumers, as health and food sciences shift from a collective approach towards individualization, from a curative to a preventive approach, and from being driven by desires rather than by technology. This means that the traditional relationships between the activities of life scientists – conducting research, advising industry, governments, and patients/consumers, consulting the public, and prescribing products, (...)
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  25. G. Baeke, J. -P. Wils & B. Broeckaert (2011). Orthodox Jewish Perspectives on Withholding and Withdrawing Life-Sustaining Treatment. Nursing Ethics 18 (6):835-846.score: 48.0
    The Jewish religious tradition summons its adherents to save life. For religious Jews preservation of life is the ultimate religious commandment. At the same time Jewish law recognizes that the agony of a moribund person may not be stretched. When the time to die has come this has to be respected. The process of dying should not needlessly be prolonged. We discuss the position of two prominent Orthodox Jewish authorities – the late Rabbi Moshe Feinstein (...)
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  26. Elmer N. Lear (1972). The Alienation of the Jewish Intellectual. Thought 47 (2):201-210.score: 48.0
    What are the taproots of estrangement among that breed of intellectual recognized as Jewish by accident of birth who have severed their religio-ethnic ties?
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  27. J. M. Ladd, M. D. Lappe, J. B. McCormick, A. M. Boyce & M. K. Cho (2009). The "How" and "Whys" of Research: Life Scientists' Views of Accountability. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (12):762-767.score: 48.0
    Objectives: To investigate life scientists’ views of accountability and the ethical and societal implications of research. Design: Qualitative focus group and one-on-one interviews. Participants: 45 Stanford University life scientists, including graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and faculty. Results: Two main themes were identified in participants’ discussions of accountability: (1) the “how” of science and (2) the “why” of science. The “how” encompassed the internal conduct of research including attributes such as honesty and independence. The “why,” or the (...)
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  28. Victoria Sutton (2009). Smarter Regulations Commentary on “Responsible Conduct by Life Scientists in an Age of Terrorism”. Science and Engineering Ethics 15 (3):303-309.score: 48.0
    In the United States a rapidly increasing regulatory burden for life scientists has led to questions of whether the increased burden resulting from the Select Agent Program has had adverse effects on scientific advances. Attention has focussed on the regulatory “fit” of the Program and ways in which its design could be improved. An international framework convention to address common concerns about biosecurity and biosafety is a logical next step. Keywords Biosafety - Biosecurity law - Biosecurity regulations - (...)
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  29. Cristian Timmermann (2013). Life Sciences, Intellectual Property Regimes and Global Justice. Dissertation, Wageningen Universityscore: 48.0
    In this thesis we have examined the complex interaction between intellectual property rights, life sciences and global justice. Science and the innovations developed in its wake have an enormous effect on our daily lives, providing countless opportunities but also raising numerous problems of justice. The complexity of a problem however does not liberate society as a whole from moral responsibilities. Our intellectual property regimes clash at various points with human rights law and commonly held notions of justice.
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  30. Isidore Epstein (1946). The Jewish Way of Life. London, E. Goldston.score: 46.5
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  31. Norbert M. Samuelson (2001). Rethinking Ethics in the Light of Jewish Thought and the Life Sciences. Journal of Religious Ethics 29 (2):209 - 233.score: 45.0
    Judaism in the twentieth century began to return to its scriptural, communal roots after a centuries-long detour through Greek-influenced natural philosophy, a detour during which science and ethics were assumed to be partners and Jewish ethics drew heavily on natural philosophy and science. Twentieth-century philosophical ethics and science, particularly biological science, have developed in such a way as to make any continuation of that historical partnership problematic. This is not altogether regrettable because the problematizing of this long-standing partnership has (...)
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  32. Ronald M. Atlas (2009). Responsible Conduct by Life Scientists in an Age of Terrorism. Science and Engineering Ethics 15 (3):293-301.score: 45.0
    The potential for dual use of research in the life sciences to be misused for harm raises a range of problems for the scientific community and policy makers. Various legal and ethical strategies are being implemented to reduce the threat of the misuse of research and knowledge in the life sciences by establishing a culture of responsible conduct.
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  33. Raphael Cohen-Almagor & Merav Shmueli (2000). Can Life Be Evaluated? The Jewish Halachic Approach Vs. The Quality of Life Approach in Medical Ethics: A Critical View. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 21 (2):117-137.score: 45.0
    In recent years there has been an increase in the number of requests formercy killings by patients and their relatives. Under certain conditions,the patient may prefer death to a life devoid of quality. In contrast to thosewho uphold this quality of life approach, those who hold the sanctity oflife approach claim that life has intrinsic value and must be preservedregardless of its quality. This essay describes these two approaches,examines their flaws, and offers a golden path between the (...)
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  34. Edward H. Sisson, A Dialog Between a Senator and a Scientist on Themes of Government Power, Science, Faith, Morality, and the Origin and Evolution of Life: Helen Astartian.score: 45.0
    Plato, in his dialog Charmides, presents the question of how society can determine whether a person who claims superior expertise in a particular field of knowledge does, in fact, possess superior expertise. In the modern era, society tends to answer this question by funding institutions (universities) that award credentials to certain individuals, asserting that those individuals possess a particular expertise; and then other institutions (the journalistic media and government) are expected to defer to the credentials. When, however, the sequential reasoning (...)
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  35. E. Alan Morinis (2002). Climbing Jacob's Ladder: One Man's Rediscovery of a Jewish Spiritual Tradition. Broadway Books.score: 45.0
    Jewish by birth, though from a secular family, Alan Morinis took a deep journey into Hinduism and Buddhism as a young man. He received a doctorate for his study of Hindu pilgrimage, learned yoga in India with B. K. S. Iyengar, and attended his first Buddhist meditation course in the Himalayas in 1974. But in 1997, when his film career went off track and he reached for some spiritual oxygen, he felt inspired to explore his Jewish heritage. In (...)
     
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  36. Robert A. Schneider (2010). Transforming the Republic of Letters: Pierre‐Daniel Huet and European Intellectual Life, 1650–1720. Intellectual History Review 20 (2):292-295.score: 43.5
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  37. April Shelford (2007). Transforming the Republic of Letters: Pierre-Daniel Huet and European Intellectual Life, 1650-1720. University of Rochester Press.score: 43.5
    A multi-faceted study of intellectual transformation in early modern Europe as seen through the eyes of a leading French scholar and cleric, Pierre-Daniel Huet (1630-1721).
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  38. Maria Rosa Menocal (2001). Writing Without Footnotes: The Role of the Medievalist in Contemporary Intellectual Life: Bernardo Lecture Series, No. 10. The Bernardo Lecture Series.score: 43.5
    Argues that academics’ intellectual engagement with a public beyond the walls of their own specialties, and even beyond the walls of the academy, was long a commonplace and significant part of the work of professors and writers in the humanities.
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  39. Patrick Baert (2011). The Sudden Rise of French Existentialism: A Case-Study in the Sociology of Intellectual Life. [REVIEW] Theory and Society 40 (6):619-644.score: 42.5
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  40. Lloyd T. Ackert Jr (2007). The “Cycle of Life” in Ecology: Sergei Vinogradskii's Soil Microbiology, 1885–1940. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 40 (1):109-145.score: 42.0
    Historians of science have attributed the emergence of ecology as a discipline in the late nineteenth century to the synthesis of Humboldtian botanical geography and Darwinian evolution. In this essay, I begin to explore another, largely neglected but very important dimension of this history. Using Sergei Vinogradskii’s career and scientific research trajectory as a point of entry, I illustrate the manner in which microbiologists, chemists, botanists, and plant physiologists inscribed the concept of a “cycle of life” into their investigations. (...)
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  41. Alexander Altmann (1981). Essays in Jewish Intellectual History. Published for Brandeis University Press by University Press of New England.score: 42.0
     
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  42. Daniel H. Frank & Oliver Leaman (eds.) (2003). The Cambridge Companion to Medieval Jewish Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 42.0
    From the ninth to the fifteenth centuries Jewish thinkers living in Islamic and Christian lands philosophized about Judaism. Influenced first by Islamic theological speculation and the great philosophers of classical antiquity, and then in the late medieval period by Christian Scholasticism, Jewish philosophers and scientists reflected on the nature of language about God, the scope and limits of human understanding, the eternity or createdness of the world, prophecy and divine providence, the possibility of human freedom, and the (...)
     
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  43. Ephraim Katzir (1989). The Meaning of Life as Represented in the Life Sciences and the Jewish Heritage. Kaplan Centre, University of Cape Town.score: 42.0
     
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  44. Jacob Neusner & Noam M. M. Neusner (eds.) (1996). The Book of Jewish Wisdom: The Talmud of the Well-Considered Life. Continuum.score: 42.0
     
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  45. J. Ross (1948). The Jewish Conception of Immortality and the Life Hereafter. Belfast, News-Letter.score: 42.0
     
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  46. Jacqueline Mariña (2012). Theism in 19th and 20th Century Intellectual Life. In Charles Taliaferro, Victoria Harrison & Stewart Goetz (eds.), Routledge Companion to Theism. Routledge.score: 40.5
    This chapter traces how theism was developed by leading 19th and 20th century figures (Schleiermacher, Hegel, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Rahner, and Tillich) responding to Kant’s Copernican revolution in philosophy. Part one deals with the ontological nature of subjectivity itself and what it reveals about the conditions of the possibility of a subject’s relation to the Absolute. Part two explores the role of subjectivity and interiority in the individual’s relation to God, and part three takes a look at the theme of the (...)
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  47. Philip E. Agre (2001). Supporting the Intellectual Life of a Democratic Society. Ethics and Information Technology 3 (4):289-298.score: 40.5
  48. Ethan Kleinberg (2008). Review of Franois Cusset, French Theory: How Foucault, Derrida, Deleuze, & Co. Transformed the Intellectual Life of the United States. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (9).score: 40.5
  49. T. Fowler (1899). The Ethics of Intellectual Life and Work. International Journal of Ethics 9 (3):296-313.score: 40.5
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  50. Alan Douglas (1987). Roman Intellectual Life Elizabeth Rawson: Intellectual Life in the Late Roman Republic. Pp. Ix + 355. London: Duckworth, 1985. £35. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 37 (02):250-252.score: 40.5
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