Search results for 'Jews Identity' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Sarah Hammerschlag (2010). The Figural Jew: Politics and Identity in Postwar French Thought. The University of Chicago Press.score: 102.0
    Introduction -- Roots, rootlessness, and fin de siècle France -- Stranger and self: Sartre's Jew -- Anti-Semite and Jew -- Dialectical history, unhappy consciousness, and the Messiah -- The ethics of uprootedness: Emmanuel Levinas's postwar project -- Literary unrest: Maurice Blanchot's rewriting of Levinas --"The Last of the Jews": Jacques Derrida and the case of the figure -- The cut -- The exemplar -- Conclusion.
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  2. Cristina M. Bettin (2013). Italian Jews: From Social Integration to the Construction of a New European Identity. The European Legacy 18 (3):327-344.score: 96.0
    In this article I discuss the history of Italian Jews from the Emancipation to the racial laws of 1938 and their present-day attitudes to Judaism and the State of Israel. My aim is to suggest how the policy of social integration enabled Italian Jews to construct a new identity without losing their ancestral heritage. The example of Italian Jewry is relevant to understanding the growing need in today?s European Union?now comprising 27 countries with different languages, cultures, and (...)
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  3. Yossi Dahan & Gal Levy (2000). Multicultural Education in the Zionist State €“ The Mizrahi Challenge. Studies in Philosophy and Education 19 (5/6):423-444.score: 84.0
    In this paper, we explore a specific variant of multicultural education inIsrael that developed within the dominant Jewish cultural identity, that isthe claim of Jews from Islamic countries (Mizrahi Jews) for educational autonomy. This demand arose against the backdrop of an aggressive nationalist ideology – Zionism – that claimed torepresent all Jews, and yet was too ambivalent toward its non-European Jewish subjects. The Mizrahi Jews' dual identity, as Jews and as products of the (...)
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  4. Adam Shear (2008). The Kuzari and the Shaping of Jewish Identity, 1167-1900. Cambridge University Press.score: 78.0
    Texts and contexts: pre-modern dissemination and transmission -- The image and function of the Kuzari in the late Middle Ages -- The Kuzari in Renaissance Italy -- Judah Moscato's project and the making of an authoritative work -- The image and function of the Kuzari in early modern Europe -- The creation of an Enlightenment Kuzari -- Continuity and change in the nineteenth century -- The emergence of late modern dichotomies.
     
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  5. Uri Ram (2000). National, Ethnic or Civic? Contesting Paradigms of Memory, Identity and Culture in Israel. Studies in Philosophy and Education 19 (5/6):405-422.score: 72.0
    Zionist national identity in Israel is today challenged by two mutuallyantagonistic alternatives: a liberal, secular, Post-Zionist civic identity, on the one hand, and ethnic, religious, Neo-Zionist nationalistic identity, on the other. The other, Zionist, hegemony contains an unsolvable tension between the national and the democratic facets of the state. The Post-Zionist trend seeks a relief of this tension by bracketing the nationalcharacter of the state, i.e., by separation of state and cultural community/ies; the Neo-Zionist trend seeks a (...)
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  6. Patrick Madigan (2008). Religious Identity in Late Antiquity: Greeks, Jews and Christians in Antioch. By Isabella Sandwell. Heythrop Journal 49 (2):318–319.score: 72.0
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  7. Richard Flower (2009). A Feel for the Game (I.) Sandwell Religious Identity in Late Antiquity. Greeks, Jews and Christians in Antioch. Pp. Xii + 310. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007. Cased, £55, US$99. ISBN: 978-0-521-87915-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 59 (02):541-.score: 72.0
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  8. Jaclyn Maxwell (2009). Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies (I.) Sandwell Religious Identity in Late Antiquity: Greeks, Jews and Christians in Antioch. (Greek Culture in the Roman World). Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2007. Pp. X + 310. €55/$99. 9780521879156. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 129:252-.score: 72.0
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  9. Alastair Hamilton (2009). The Religious Enlightenment: Protestants, Jews, and Catholics From London to Vienna. By David Sorkin and Voltaire's Jews and Modern Jewish Identity: Rethinking the Enlightenment. By Harvey Mitchell. Heythrop Journal 50 (6):1058-1059.score: 72.0
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  10. Cindy Holder (2010). How Diasporic Peoples Maintain Their Identity in Multicultural Societies: Chinese, Africans, Jews, by Norman Vasu. Lewiston, NY: Edwin Mellen Press, 2008. Pp. Iii + 273. ISBN 13: 978-0-7734-4896-4; ISBN 10: 0-7734-4896-9. $109.05. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 15 (2):160-161.score: 72.0
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  11. Michael Ragussis (2000). Jews and Other "Outlandish Englishmen": Ethnic Performance and the Invention of British Identity Under the Georges. Critical Inquiry 26 (4):773.score: 72.0
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  12. Maurice Samuels (2010). Jews and the Construction of French Identity From Balzac to Proust. In Christie McDonald & Susan Rubin Suleiman (eds.), French Global: A New Approach to Literary History. Columbia University Press.score: 72.0
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  13. Victor J. Seidler (1998). Identity, Memory and Difference: Lyotard and 'the Jews. In Chris Rojek, Bryan S. Turner & Jean-François Lyotard (eds.), The Politics of Jean-François Lyotard. Routledge. 102--127.score: 72.0
     
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  14. Lisa Tessman & Bat-Ami Bar On (eds.) (2001). Jewish Locations: Traversing Racialized Landscapes. Rowman & Littlefield.score: 72.0
    This volume brings together essays that reflect on ontological and moral dilemmas regarding Jewish identity and race. The reflections offered here take place in the context of post-Holocaust transformations and pay special attention to the double processes of the deracialization of Jews qua Jews and the recasting of Jews both in reracialized and in other terms. As a result, the essays bring together and create intersections between Jewish studies and critical theories of race and help stretch (...)
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  15. Laurence Thomas (2000). Group Autonomy and Narrative Identity: Blacks and Jews. In Bernard Boxill (ed.), Race and Racism. Oup Oxford.score: 72.0
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  16. Daniel B. Schwartz (2012). The First Modern Jew: Spinoza and the History of an Image. Princeton University Press.score: 68.0
    Ex-Jew, eternal Jew: early representations of the Jewish Spinoza -- Refining Spinoza: Moses Mendelssohn's response to the Amsterdam heretic -- The first modern Jew: Berthold Auerbach's Spinoza and the beginnings of an image -- A rebel against the past, a revealer of secrets: Salomon Rubin and the east European Maskilic Spinoza -- From the heights of Mount Scopus: Yosef Klausner and the Zionist rehabilitation of Spinoza -- Farewell, Spinoza: I. B. Singer and the tragicomedy of the Jewish Spinozist.
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  17. Eliezer Schweid (2008). The Idea of Modern Jewish Culture. Academic Studies Press.score: 60.0
    This is a large, complex story in which the author describes the contributions of Mendelssohn, Wessely, Krochmal, Zunz, the mainstream Zionist thinkers ...
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  18. Israel Idalovichi (2010). Creating National Identity Through a Legend –The Case of the Wandering Jew. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 4 (12):3-26.score: 60.0
    In this paper I propose to examine a mythical character that has a tremendous influence on the debate over the new Israeli-Jewish identity. The paper argues that the Wandering/Eternal Jew, aside from its intrinsic importance for Jewish History, functions as a mechanism through which the opposition with the Sabra is maintained in Israeli society. Present time history textbooks try to capture only those aspects of Israeli history relevant for modern contemporary society and culture, for the great majority of scholars (...)
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  19. Jonathan Boyarin (2008). Jewishness and the Human Dimension. Fordham University Press.score: 60.0
    A Jewish introduction to the human sciences -- Responsive thinking: cultural studies and Jewish historiography -- Seasons and lifetimes -- Toward an anthropology of the twentieth century -- Tropes of home -- A moment of danger, a taste of death -- Extinction and difference.
     
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  20. Harel Gordin (2007). Halakhah U-Fesiḳat Halakhah Be-ʻolam Mishtaneh: ʻiyun Ben-Teḥumi Bi-Fesiḳotaṿ Shel Ha-Rav Mosheh Fainshṭain.score: 60.0
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  21. Gideon Katz (2011). The Pale God: Israeli Secularism and Spinoza's Philosopy of Culture. Academic Studies Press.score: 60.0
    The Pale God examines the relationship between secularism and religious tradition. It begins with a description of the secular options as expressed by Israeli intellectuals, and describes how these options have led to a dead end. A new option must be sought, and one of the key sources for this option is the works of Spinoza. The author explains that unlike Nietzsche, who discussed "the death of God," Spinoza tried to undermine the authority of religious virtuosos and establish the image (...)
     
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  22. Abraham Isaac Kook (2008). Maʼamar Ha-Dor: Mabaṭ Emuni El Ha-Temurot Ba-ʻam Ha-Yehudi Ba-ʻet Ha-Ḥadashah. Mekhon Binyan Ha-Torah.score: 60.0
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  23. Hizky Shoham (2013). Mordekhai Rokhev ʻal Sus: Ḥagigot Purim Be-Tel-Aviv, 1908-1936, U-Veniyatah Shel Umah Ḥadashah. Hotsaʼat Universiṭat Bar-Ilan.score: 60.0
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  24. Alina Branda (2010). Andrei Oisteanu, The Image of the Jew in Romanian Culture. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 1 (3):251-253.score: 56.0
    Andrei Oisteanu, The Image of the Jew in Romanian Culture Humanitas Publishing House, Bucharest, 2001.
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  25. Predrag Krstic (2006). Critical Theory and Holocaust. Filozofija I Drustvo 29:37-73.score: 48.0
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  26. Dawne Moon (2013). Powerful Emotions: Symbolic Power and the (Productive and Punitive) Force of Collective Feeling. [REVIEW] Theory and Society 42 (3):261-294.score: 48.0
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  27. Paul E. Nahme (2012). The Jews as a Chosen People: Tradition and Transformation. Philosophy East and West 62 (1):139-144.score: 42.0
    S. Leyla Gürkan’s The Jews as a Chosen People: Tradition and Transformation is a bold attempt to trace the concept of the election of Israel from its Biblical and early Rabbinic development to the early modern and post-holocaust periods. Written as the history of an idea, the common thread tying the work together is the account and analysis of how this single, sometimes thorny, question of “chosenness” has animated Jewish conceptions of identity throughout its history. The author’s focus (...)
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  28. Paul Knepper (2005). Michael Polanyi and Jewish Identity. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 35 (3):263-293.score: 42.0
    s Jewish identity contributed to his philosophical outlook. His life in a Hungarian-acculturated, nonobservant Jewish family in the last decades of the Austro-Hungarian Empire; his experience as a Jew emigrating from Hitler’s Germany; and his thoughts about Zionism informed his theory of knowledge. During the late 1930s and 1940s, he worked to reconcile his Jewish identity with his commitments to Christianity, and this tension contributed to his thinking about the nature of scientific discovery. The malapropism baptized Jew characterizes (...)
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  29. David Mittelberg & Lilach Lev Ari (1995). Jewish Identity, Jewish Education and Experience of the Kibbutz in Israel. Journal of Moral Education 24 (3):327-344.score: 42.0
    Abstract In this paper we examine the role of the Israeli kibbutz experience as an agent of informal education in cross?cultural settings, acting as a transformative agent of ethnic identity. The study presents, through comparative longitudinal analysis, the changes in Jewish identity and values of young North American Jews between their arrival in Israel and the conclusion of the kibbutz programme, as well as after they have returned to their home country. The analysis utilises data gathered from (...)
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  30. Jason D. Hill (2009). Beyond Blood Identities: Post Humanity in the Twenty-First Century. Lexington Books.score: 42.0
    Introduction -- Moral reasoning from a cosmopolitan perspective : the problem of culture -- Culturalism and moral reasoning -- Towards a moral conceptual base of culture -- Cosmopolitanism : a definition and the question of tolerance -- Who owns culture : a moral cosmopolitan inquiry -- Culture-faith : the mystification of culture -- Culture-faith applied : cultural privacy and the ownership of native culture -- Counter arguments against applied culture faith : the right to cultural privacy -- Representation without authorization (...)
     
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  31. Yitzhak Melamed (2009). Review of Yirmiyahu Yovel, The Other Within: The Marranos: Split Identity and Emerging Modernity (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2009). [REVIEW] Journal of Modern History 82.score: 30.0
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  32. Cathryn Bailey (2007). We Are What We Eat: Feminist Vegetarianism and the Reproduction of Racial Identity. Hypatia 22 (2):39-59.score: 24.0
    : In this article, Bailey analyzes the relationship between ethical vegetarianism (or the claim that ethical vegetarianism is morally right for all people) and white racism (the claim that white solipsistic and possibly white privileged ethical claims are imperialistically or insensitively universalized over less privileged human lives). This plays out in the dreaded comparison of animals with people of color and Jews as exemplified in the PETA campaign and the need for human identification (or solidarity) with animals in ethical (...)
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  33. Andrew Benjamin (2007). What If the Other Were an Animal? Hegel on Jews, Animals and Disease. Critical Horizons 8 (1):61-77.score: 24.0
    The question of the other appears to be a uniquely human concern. Engagement with the nature of alterity and the quality of the other are philosophical projects that commence with an assumed anthropocentrism. This anthropocentrism will be pursued by way of Hegel's discussion of "disease" in his Philosophy of Nature. Disease is implicitly bound up with race, racial identity and animality, and provides an opening to the question: what if the other were an animal? Any answer to this question (...)
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  34. Malachi Haim Hacohen (1996). Karl Popper in Exile: The Viennese Progressive Imagination and the Making of the Open Society. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 26 (4):452-492.score: 24.0
    This article explores the impact of Popper's exile on the formation of The Open Society. It proposes homelessness as a major motif in Popper's life and work. His emigration from clerical-fascist Austria, sojourn in New Zealand during World War II, and social isolation in postwar England constituted a permanent exile. In cosmopolitan philosophy, he searched for a new home. His unended quest issued in a liberal cosmopolitan vision of scientific and political communities pursuing truth and reform. The Open Society was (...)
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  35. Yirmiyahu Yovel (1989/1992). Spinoza and Other Heretics. Princeton University Press.score: 24.0
    This ambitious study presents Baruch Spinoza (1632-1677) as the most outstanding and influential thinker of modernity--and examines the question of whether he was the "first secular Jew." A number-one bestseller in Israel, Spinoza and Other Heretics is made up of two volumes--The Marrano of Reason and The Adventures of Immanence offered as a set and also separately. Yirmiyahu Yovel, Professor of Philosophy at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, shows how Spinoza grounded a philosophical revolution in a radically new principle--the philosophy (...)
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  36. Erich Fromm & Douglas Kellner, Judaism, and the Frankfurt School.score: 24.0
    The Frankfurt School had a highly ambivalent relation to Judaism. On one hand, they were part of that Enlightenment tradition that opposed authority, tradition, and all institutions of the past -- including religion. They were also, for the most part, secular Jews who did not support any organized religion, or practice religious or cultural Judaism. In this sense, they were in the tradition of Heine, Marx, and Freud for whom Judaism was neither a constitutive feature of their life or (...)
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  37. Daniel A. Farber (1997). Beyond All Reason: The Radical Assault on Truth in American Law. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Would you want to be operated on by a surgeon trained at a medical school that did not evaluate its students? Would you want to fly in a plane designed by people convinced that the laws of physics are socially constructed? Would you want to be tried by a legal system indifferent to the distinction between fact and fiction? These questions may seem absurd, but there are theories being seriously advanced by radical multiculturalists that force us to ask such questions. (...)
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  38. L. J. (2001). Ideologies of Discrimination: Personhood and the 'Genetic Group'. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 32 (4):705-721.score: 24.0
    'Ideologies of Discrimination' considers the implications of the new genetics for understandings of personhood and for understandings of the relationship between people in groups. In particular, the essay delineates and examines the emerging notion of a 'genetic group' and considers the social implications of redefining families, racial groups and ethnic groups through express, and often exclusive, reference to a shared genome. One consequence of such redefinition has been the justification and elaboration of stigmatizing images of and discrimination against such groups-especially (...)
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  39. Rainer Rochlitz (1986). Briefe: 1903–1975. Telos 1986 (69):196-200.score: 24.0
    Bloch's correspondence, published the year of his hundredth birthday, evokes a period of German philosophy which today seems forever gone. In exile in Switzerland at the outbreak of WWI, Czechoslovakia and the United States during die Nazi period and in bodi Germanies after 1945, Bloch epitomized an extraordinary symbiosis of the Jewish and the German spirits. Benjamin, Adorno, and Bloch were assimilated Jews unaware of their identity (or difference) except dirough the disdainful look of others. They saw themselves (...)
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  40. Emily Zakin (2013). Godless Jews and Secular Christians: A Commentary on Gil Anidjar's “Jesus and Monotheism”. Southern Journal of Philosophy 51 (S1):184-195.score: 24.0
    Responding to Gil Anidjar's “Jesus and Monotheism” and its posing of the “Christian Question,” in this paper I return to Freud's Moses and Monotheism and its narrative of Jewish self-division. In highlighting the retroactive formation of identity, I note both its temporal dimension and the force of exclusivity it generates. This reading suggests a contrast between such theo-political communities, with their legacies of affiliation, and Christian self-absolution (the refusal of constitutive self-division) with its image of a new man. I (...)
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  41. Maxwell Stephen Kennel (2013). What is a Compendium? Parataxis, Hypotaxis, and the Question of the Book. Continent 3 (1):44-49.score: 24.0
    Writing, the exigency of writing: no longer the writing that has always (through a necessity in no way avoidable) been in the service of the speech or thought that is called idealist (that is to say, moralizing), but rather the writing that through its own slowly liberated force (the aleatory force of absence) seems to devote itself solely to itself as something that remains without identity, and little by little brings forth possibilities that are entirely other: an anonymous, distracted, (...)
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  42. Tomis Kapitan, The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict: Its History, and Some Philosophical Questions It Raises.score: 24.0
    Preface The conflict between Israeli Jews and Palestinian Arabs has endured for a century. It centers on control of territory and, as common in such disputes, is characterized by conquest, destruction, and revenge, with all the animosity and sorrow that these actions bring. Because the land in question is terra sancta to three major religions, the conflict evokes powerful passions involving identity, honor, and the propriety of cultural claims. That its disputants employ sophisticated arguments and armaments, that they (...)
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  43. Douglas Kellner, Erich Fromm, Judaism, and the Frankfurt School.score: 24.0
    The Frankfurt School had a highly ambivalent relation to Judaism. On one hand, they were part of that Enlightenment tradition that opposed authority, tradition, and all institutions of the past -- including religion. They were also, for the most part, secular Jews who did not support any organized religion, or practice religious or cultural Judaism. In this sense, they were in the tradition of Heine, Marx, and Freud for whom Judaism was neither a constitutive feature of their life or (...)
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  44. John K. Riches (1996). The Social World of Jesus. Interpretation 50 (4):383-393.score: 24.0
    The world into which Jesus was born in Galilee was thoroughly Jewish. It was also divided along social and economic lines and by the manner in which Jews dealt with gentiles. This is evident from different ways in which Jewish identity was conceived and differing attitudes toward land and temple. Jesus' teaching reflects this social context and interacts with it.
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  45. Lawrence A. Hoffman (2010). Principle, Story, and Myth in the Liturgical Search for Identity. Interpretation 64 (3):231-244.score: 24.0
    As a self-conscious religious collective with minority status, Jews seeking recognition in the modem nation-state have had to fashion not just principles of belief, but also a narrative to articulate the historical essence of their existence. The most common narrative of the twentieth century has been a story, not a myth—a story, moreover, with limited capacity for interfaith dialogue. By the end of the century, that story began to lose its compelling quality. The twenty-first century demands a return to (...)
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  46. Paul D. Hanson (2010). Religious Identity in the Public Square. Interpretation 64 (3):258-268.score: 24.0
    This article grows out of and hopes to remain a part of a conversation in which Jews and Christians ponder over the manner in which they can contribute to the public good from the richness of their Scriptures and traditions. It suggests a thoughtful hermeneutic that is simultaneously faithful to ancestral traditions and open to the contributions of all thoughtful individuals and groups within a diverse society.
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  47. Stefanie Knauss (2006). "A Jew in a Porsche". Jewish (Religious) Identities in Contemporary Europe. Disputatio Philosophica 8 (1):17-33.score: 24.0
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  48. Maren R. Niehoff (1999). Jewish Identity and Jewish Mothers: Who Was a Jew According to Philo? The Studia Philonica Annual 11.score: 24.0
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  49. Simone Gozzano (2012). Type-Identity Conditions for Phenomenal Properties. In Simone Gozzano & Christopher S. Hill (eds.), New Perspective on Type Identity. The Mental and the Physical. Cambridge University Press. 111.score: 21.0
    In this essay I shall argue that the crucial assumptions of Kripke's argument, i.e. the collapse of the appearance/reality distinction in the case of phenomenal states and the idea of a qualitatively identical epistemic situation, imply an objective principle of identity for mental-state types. This principle, I shall argue, rather than being at odds with physicalism, is actually compatible with both the type-identity theory of the mind and Kripke's semantics and metaphysics. Finally, I shall sketch a version of (...)
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