Search results for 'Jews Identity' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  12
    Cristina M. Bettin (2013). Italian Jews: From Social Integration to the Construction of a New European Identity. The European Legacy 18 (3):327-344.
    In this article I discuss the history of Italian Jews from the Emancipation to the racial laws of 1938 and their present-day attitudes to Judaism and the State of Israel. My aim is to suggest how the policy of social integration enabled Italian Jews to construct a new identity without losing their ancestral heritage. The example of Italian Jewry is relevant to understanding the growing need in today?s European Union?now comprising 27 countries with different languages, cultures, and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Kristen Monroe, Kay Mathiesen & Jack Craypo (1998). If Moral Action Flows Naturally From Identity And Perspective, Is It Meaningful To Speak Of Moral Choice? Virtue Ethics And Rescuers Of Jews During The Holocaust. Jahrbuch für Recht Und Ethik 6.
    We considered supererogatory behavior as illustrated by people who rescued Jews in Nazi Europe. When we did so, we encountered a puzzling empirical finding: rescuers insisted they had no choice in their life-or-death actions. Rescuers' perspectives -- how they saw themselves in relation to others -- served as a powerful constraint on choice as traditionally conceived. Traditional moral theories failed to provide satisfactory explanations for this phenomenon, and we turned to virtue ethics to determine whether this approach, with its (...)
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  11
    Richard Flower (2009). A Feel for the Game (I.) Sandwell Religious Identity in Late Antiquity. Greeks, Jews and Christians in Antioch. Pp. Xii + 310. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007. Cased, £55, US$99. ISBN: 978-0-521-87915-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 59 (02):541-.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  11
    Patrick Madigan (2008). Religious Identity in Late Antiquity: Greeks, Jews and Christians in Antioch. By Isabella Sandwell. Heythrop Journal 49 (2):318–319.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  3
    Cindy Holder (2010). How Diasporic Peoples Maintain Their Identity in Multicultural Societies: Chinese, Africans, Jews, by Norman Vasu. Lewiston, NY: Edwin Mellen Press, 2008. Pp. Iii + 273. ISBN 13: 978-0-7734-4896-4; ISBN 10: 0-7734-4896-9. $109.05. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 15 (2):160-161.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  2
    Jaclyn Maxwell (2009). Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies (I.) Sandwell Religious Identity in Late Antiquity: Greeks, Jews and Christians in Antioch. (Greek Culture in the Roman World). Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2007. Pp. X + 310. €55/$99. 9780521879156. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 129:252-.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  1
    Alastair Hamilton (2009). The Religious Enlightenment: Protestants, Jews, and Catholics From London to Vienna. By David Sorkin and Voltaire's Jews and Modern Jewish Identity: Rethinking the Enlightenment. By Harvey Mitchell. Heythrop Journal 50 (6):1058-1059.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. Reuven Firestone & Daniel Frank (1999). The Jews of Medieval Islam, Community, Society, Identity: Proceedings of an International Conference Held by the Institute of Jewish Studies, University College, London, 1992. Journal of the American Oriental Society 119 (2):322.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Harvey Mitchell (2008). Voltaire's Jews and Modern Jewish Identity: Rethinking the Enlightenment. Routledge.
    Harvey Mitchell’s book argues that a reassessment of Voltaire’s treatment of traditional Judaism will sharpen discussion of the origins of, and responses to, the Enlightenment. His study shows how Voltaire’s nearly total antipathy to Judaism is best understood by stressing his self-regard as the author of an enlightened and rational universal history, which found Judaism’s memory of its past incoherent, and, in addition, failed to meet the criteria of objective history—a project in which he failed. Calling on an array of (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Harvey Mitchell (2007). Voltaire's Jews and Modern Jewish Identity: Rethinking the Enlightenment. Routledge.
    Harvey Mitchell’s book argues that a reassessment of Voltaire’s treatment of traditional Judaism will sharpen discussion of the origins of, and responses to, the Enlightenment. His study shows how Voltaire’s nearly total antipathy to Judaism is best understood by stressing his self-regard as the author of an enlightened and rational universal history, which found Judaism’s memory of its past incoherent, and, in addition, failed to meet the criteria of objective history—a project in which he failed. Calling on an array of (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Michael Ragussis (2000). Jews and Other "Outlandish Englishmen": Ethnic Performance and the Invention of British Identity Under the Georges. Critical Inquiry 26 (4):773-797.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Maurice Samuels (2010). Jews and the Construction of French Identity From Balzac to Proust. In Christie McDonald & Susan Rubin Suleiman (eds.), French Global: A New Approach to Literary History. Columbia University Press
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Victor J. Seidler (1998). Identity, Memory and Difference: Lyotard and 'the Jews. In Chris Rojek, Bryan S. Turner & Jean-François Lyotard (eds.), The Politics of Jean-François Lyotard. Routledge 102--127.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. Laurence Thomas (2000). Group Autonomy and Narrative Identity: Blacks and Jews. In Bernard Boxill (ed.), Race and Racism. OUP Oxford
  15.  4
    Sarah Hammerschlag (2010). The Figural Jew: Politics and Identity in Postwar French Thought. The University of Chicago Press.
    Introduction -- Roots, rootlessness, and fin de siècle France -- Stranger and self: Sartre's Jew -- Anti-Semite and Jew -- Dialectical history, unhappy consciousness, and the Messiah -- The ethics of uprootedness: Emmanuel Levinas's postwar project -- Literary unrest: Maurice Blanchot's rewriting of Levinas --"The Last of the Jews": Jacques Derrida and the case of the figure -- The cut -- The exemplar -- Conclusion.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  16. Adam Shear (2008). The Kuzari and the Shaping of Jewish Identity, 1167-1900. Cambridge University Press.
    Texts and contexts: premodern dissemination and transmission -- The image and function of the Kuzari in the late Middle Ages -- The Kuzari in Renaissance Italy -- Judah Moscato's project and the making of an authoritative work -- The image and function of the Kuzari in early modern Europe -- The creation of an Enlightenment Kuzari -- Continuity and change in the nineteenth century -- Conclusion: The emergence of late modern dichotomies.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  17. Adam Shear (2008). The Kuzari and the Shaping of Jewish Identity, 1167-1900. Cambridge University Press.
    Texts and contexts: pre-modern dissemination and transmission -- The image and function of the Kuzari in the late Middle Ages -- The Kuzari in Renaissance Italy -- Judah Moscato's project and the making of an authoritative work -- The image and function of the Kuzari in early modern Europe -- The creation of an Enlightenment Kuzari -- Continuity and change in the nineteenth century -- The emergence of late modern dichotomies.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  25
    Uri Ram (2000). National, Ethnic or Civic? Contesting Paradigms of Memory, Identity and Culture in Israel. Studies in Philosophy and Education 19 (5/6):405-422.
    Zionist national identity in Israel is today challenged by two mutuallyantagonistic alternatives: a liberal, secular, Post-Zionist civic identity, on the one hand, and ethnic, religious, Neo-Zionist nationalistic identity, on the other. The other, Zionist, hegemony contains an unsolvable tension between the national and the democratic facets of the state. The Post-Zionist trend seeks a relief of this tension by bracketing the nationalcharacter of the state, i.e., by separation of state and cultural community/ies; the Neo-Zionist trend seeks a (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  19.  31
    Yossi Dahan & Gal Levy (2000). Multicultural Education in the Zionist State €“ The Mizrahi Challenge. Studies in Philosophy and Education 19 (5/6):423-444.
    In this paper, we explore a specific variant of multicultural education inIsrael that developed within the dominant Jewish cultural identity, that isthe claim of Jews from Islamic countries (Mizrahi Jews) for educational autonomy. This demand arose against the backdrop of an aggressive nationalist ideology – Zionism – that claimed torepresent all Jews, and yet was too ambivalent toward its non-European Jewish subjects. The Mizrahi Jews' dual identity, as Jews and as products of the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  7
    Predrag Krstic (2006). Critical Theory and Holocaust. Filozofija I Društvo 29:37-73.
    In this paper the author is attempting to establish the relationship - or the lack of it - of the Critical Theory to the "Jewish question" and justification of perceiving signs of Jewish religious heritage in the thought of the representatives of this movement. The holocaust marked out by the name of "Auschwitz", is here tested as a point where the nature of this relationship has been decided. In this encounter with the cardinal challenge for the contemporary social theory, the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  21. Lisa Tessman & Bat-Ami Bar On (eds.) (2001). Jewish Locations: Traversing Racialized Landscapes. Rowman & Littlefield.
    This volume brings together essays that reflect on ontological and moral dilemmas regarding Jewish identity and race. The reflections offered here take place in the context of post-Holocaust transformations and pay special attention to the double processes of the deracialization of Jews qua Jews and the recasting of Jews both in reracialized and in other terms. As a result, the essays bring together and create intersections between Jewish studies and critical theories of race and help stretch (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  22
    Daniel B. Schwartz (2012). The First Modern Jew: Spinoza and the History of an Image. Princeton University Press.
    Ex-Jew, eternal Jew: early representations of the Jewish Spinoza -- Refining Spinoza: Moses Mendelssohn's response to the Amsterdam heretic -- The first modern Jew: Berthold Auerbach's Spinoza and the beginnings of an image -- A rebel against the past, a revealer of secrets: Salomon Rubin and the east European Maskilic Spinoza -- From the heights of Mount Scopus: Yosef Klausner and the Zionist rehabilitation of Spinoza -- Farewell, Spinoza: I. B. Singer and the tragicomedy of the Jewish Spinozist.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  23. Jonathan Boyarin (2008). Jewishness and the Human Dimension. Fordham University Press.
    A Jewish introduction to the human sciences -- Responsive thinking: cultural studies and Jewish historiography -- Seasons and lifetimes -- Toward an anthropology of the twentieth century -- Tropes of home -- A moment of danger, a taste of death -- Extinction and difference.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  24. Harel Gordin (2007). Halakhah U-Fesiḳat Halakhah Be-ʻolam Mishtaneh: ʻiyun Ben-Teḥumi Bi-Fesiḳotaṿ Shel Ha-Rav Mosheh Fainshṭain.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. Gideon Katz (2011). The Pale God: Israeli Secularism and Spinoza's Philosopy of Culture. Academic Studies Press.
    The Pale God examines the relationship between secularism and religious tradition. It begins with a description of the secular options as expressed by Israeli intellectuals, and describes how these options have led to a dead end. A new option must be sought, and one of the key sources for this option is the works of Spinoza. The author explains that unlike Nietzsche, who discussed "the death of God," Spinoza tried to undermine the authority of religious virtuosos and establish the image (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. Abraham Isaac Kook (2008). Maʼamar Ha-Dor: Mabaṭ Emuni El Ha-Temurot Ba-ʻam Ha-Yehudi Ba-ʻet Ha-Ḥadashah. Mekhon Binyan Ha-Torah.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  5
    Eliezer Schweid (2008). The Idea of Modern Jewish Culture. Academic Studies Press.
    This is a large, complex story in which the author describes the contributions of Mendelssohn, Wessely, Krochmal, Zunz, the mainstream Zionist thinkers ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. Hizky Shoham (2013). Mordekhai Rokhev ʻal Sus: Ḥagigot Purim Be-Tel-Aviv, 1908-1936, U-Veniyatah Shel Umah Ḥadashah. Hotsaʼat Universiṭat Bar-Ilan.
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  10
    Paul Knepper (2005). Michael Polanyi and Jewish Identity. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 35 (3):263-293.
    s Jewish identity contributed to his philosophical outlook. His life in a Hungarian-acculturated, nonobservant Jewish family in the last decades of the Austro-Hungarian Empire; his experience as a Jew emigrating from Hitler’s Germany; and his thoughts about Zionism informed his theory of knowledge. During the late 1930s and 1940s, he worked to reconcile his Jewish identity with his commitments to Christianity, and this tension contributed to his thinking about the nature of scientific discovery. The malapropism baptized Jew characterizes (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  30.  15
    Paul E. Nahme (2012). The Jews as a Chosen People: Tradition and Transformation. Philosophy East and West 62 (1):139-144.
    S. Leyla Gürkan’s The Jews as a Chosen People: Tradition and Transformation is a bold attempt to trace the concept of the election of Israel from its Biblical and early Rabbinic development to the early modern and post-holocaust periods. Written as the history of an idea, the common thread tying the work together is the account and analysis of how this single, sometimes thorny, question of “chosenness” has animated Jewish conceptions of identity throughout its history. The author’s focus (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  5
    Charles Barber (1997). The Truth in Painting: Iconoclasm and Identity in Early-Medieval Art. Speculum 72 (4):1019-1036.
    It is now forty years since the publication of one of the defining papers on early-medieval art, Ernst Kitzinger's “The Cult of Images in the Age before Iconoclasm.” This article remains a deeply influential study on early-medieval attitudes toward visual culture, arguing, as it does, that the political crises of the later sixth century helped produce a turn toward a new function for religious imagery as belief in the political and military strength of the Byzantine Empire crumbled. The implications of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  3
    Susannah Ticciati (2006). Scriptural Reasoning and the Formation of Identity. Modern Theology 22 (3):421-438.
    This essay seeks to give a Christian rationale for the practice of Scriptural Reasoning by exploring how it might constitute a locus for the formation of Christian identity. It argues for an understanding of the universality of the Christian biblical story, not in terms of conceptual resolution, according to which all others are inscribed into its universe, but in terms of its call to transformation and conversion—engendered, first and foremost, by Scripture's resistance to interpretation. It contends that such resistance (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  8
    David Mittelberg & Lilach Lev Ari (1995). Jewish Identity, Jewish Education and Experience of the Kibbutz in Israel. Journal of Moral Education 24 (3):327-344.
    Abstract In this paper we examine the role of the Israeli kibbutz experience as an agent of informal education in cross?cultural settings, acting as a transformative agent of ethnic identity. The study presents, through comparative longitudinal analysis, the changes in Jewish identity and values of young North American Jews between their arrival in Israel and the conclusion of the kibbutz programme, as well as after they have returned to their home country. The analysis utilises data gathered from (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. Ken Koltun-Fromm (2001). Moses Hess and Modern Jewish Identity. Indiana University Press.
    "Koltun-Fromm’s reading of Hess is of crucial import for those who study the construction of self in the modern world as well as for those who are concerned with Hess and his contributions to modern thought.... a reading of Hess that is subtle, judicious, insightful, and well supported." —David Ellenson Moses Hess, a fascinating 19th-century German Jewish intellectual figure, was at times religious and secular, traditional and modern, practical and theoretical, socialist and nationalist. Ken Koltun-Fromm’s radical reinterpretation of his writings (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. Ken Koltun-Fromm (2001). Moses Hess and Modern Jewish Identity. Indiana University Press.
    "Koltun-Fromm’s reading of Hess is of crucial import for those who study the construction of self in the modern world as well as for those who are concerned with Hess and his contributions to modern thought.... a reading of Hess that is subtle, judicious, insightful, and well supported." —David Ellenson Moses Hess, a fascinating 19th-century German Jewish intellectual figure, was at times religious and secular, traditional and modern, practical and theoretical, socialist and nationalist. Ken Koltun-Fromm’s radical reinterpretation of his writings (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. Kristen Renwick Monroe (2011). Ethics in an Age of Terror and Genocide: Identity and Moral Choice. Princeton University Press.
    What causes genocide? Why do some stand by, doing nothing, while others risk their lives to help the persecuted? Ethics in an Age of Terror and Genocide analyzes riveting interviews with bystanders, Nazi supporters, and rescuers of Jews during the Holocaust to lay bare critical psychological forces operating during genocide. Monroe's insightful examination of these moving--and disturbing--interviews underscores the significance of identity for moral choice. Monroe finds that self-image and identity--especially the sense of self in relation to (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. Howard Wettstein (ed.) (2002). Diasporas and Exiles: Varieties of Jewish Identity. University of California Press.
    Diaspora, considered as a context for insights into Jewish identity, brings together a lively, interdisciplinary group of scholars in this innovative volume. Readers needn't expect, however, to find easy agreement on what those insights are. The concept "diaspora" itself has proved controversial; _galut, _the traditional Hebrew expression for the Jews' perennial condition, is better translated as "exile." The very distinction between diaspora and exile, although difficult to analyze, is important enough to form the basis of several essays in (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. Elisabeth Young-Bruehl (2010). Hannah Arendt's Jewish Identity. In Roger Berkowitz, Jeffrey Katz & Thomas Keenan (eds.), Thinking in Dark Times: Hannah Arendt on Ethics and Politics. Fordham University Press
    The topic of Hannah Arendt's Jewish identity can be approached from many directions. This chapter considers Arendt in the context of the vision of world history articulated by her teacher and mentor Karl Jaspers, in which her people, the Jews of Palestine, were considered as one of the “Axial Age” peoples. It argues that it is Arendt's Jewish identity—not just the identity she asserted in defending herself as a Jew when attacked as one, but more deeply (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. Steven B. Smith (1997). Spinoza, Liberalism, and the Question of Jewish Identity. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    Baruch de Spinoza —often recognized as the first modern Jewish thinker—was also a founder of modern liberal political philosophy. This book is the first to connect systematically these two aspects of Spinoza's legacy. Steven B. Smith shows that Spinoza was a politically engaged theorist who both advocated and embodied a new conception of the emancipated individual, a thinker who decisively influenced such diverse movements as the Enlightenment, liberalism, and political Zionism. Focusing on Spinoza's _Theologico-Political Treatise_, Smith argues that Spinoza was (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  40.  20
    Dawne Moon (2013). Powerful Emotions: Symbolic Power and the (Productive and Punitive) Force of Collective Feeling. [REVIEW] Theory and Society 42 (3):261-294.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. Alina Branda (2010). Andrei Oisteanu, The Image of the Jew in Romanian Culture. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 1 (3):251-253.
    Andrei Oisteanu, The Image of the Jew in Romanian Culture Humanitas Publishing House, Bucharest, 2001.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. Yitzhak Melamed (2009). Review of Yirmiyahu Yovel, The Other Within: The Marranos: Split Identity and Emerging Modernity (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2009). [REVIEW] Journal of Modern History 82.
  43. Martin L. Davies (1995). Identity or History? Marcus Herz and the End of the Enlightenment.
  44. Steven M. Nadler, Manfred Walther & Elhanan Yakira (2003). Spinoza and Jewish Identity.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45. Mitchell Silver (1998). Respecting the Wicked Child a Philosophy of Secular Jewish Identity and Education.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. Cathryn Bailey (2007). We Are What We Eat: Feminist Vegetarianism and the Reproduction of Racial Identity. Hypatia 22 (2):39-59.
    : In this article, Bailey analyzes the relationship between ethical vegetarianism (or the claim that ethical vegetarianism is morally right for all people) and white racism (the claim that white solipsistic and possibly white privileged ethical claims are imperialistically or insensitively universalized over less privileged human lives). This plays out in the dreaded comparison of animals with people of color and Jews as exemplified in the PETA campaign and the need for human identification (or solidarity) with animals in ethical (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  47.  48
    Andrew Benjamin (2007). What If the Other Were an Animal? Hegel on Jews, Animals and Disease. Critical Horizons 8 (1):61-77.
    The question of the other appears to be a uniquely human concern. Engagement with the nature of alterity and the quality of the other are philosophical projects that commence with an assumed anthropocentrism. This anthropocentrism will be pursued by way of Hegel's discussion of "disease" in his Philosophy of Nature. Disease is implicitly bound up with race, racial identity and animality, and provides an opening to the question: what if the other were an animal? Any answer to this question (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  5
    Lawrence A. Hoffman (2010). Principle, Story, and Myth in the Liturgical Search for Identity. Interpretation 64 (3):231-244.
    As a self-conscious religious collective with minority status, Jews seeking recognition in the modem nation-state have had to fashion not just principles of belief, but also a narrative to articulate the historical essence of their existence. The most common narrative of the twentieth century has been a story, not a myth—a story, moreover, with limited capacity for interfaith dialogue. By the end of the century, that story began to lose its compelling quality. The twenty-first century demands a return to (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  7
    Emily Zakin (2013). Godless Jews and Secular Christians: A Commentary on Gil Anidjar's “Jesus and Monotheism”. Southern Journal of Philosophy 51 (S1):184-195.
    Responding to Gil Anidjar's “Jesus and Monotheism” and its posing of the “Christian Question,” in this paper I return to Freud's Moses and Monotheism and its narrative of Jewish self-division. In highlighting the retroactive formation of identity, I note both its temporal dimension and the force of exclusivity it generates. This reading suggests a contrast between such theo-political communities, with their legacies of affiliation, and Christian self-absolution (the refusal of constitutive self-division) with its image of a new man. I (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  3
    Paul D. Hanson (2010). Religious Identity in the Public Square. Interpretation 64 (3):258-268.
    This article grows out of and hopes to remain a part of a conversation in which Jews and Christians ponder over the manner in which they can contribute to the public good from the richness of their Scriptures and traditions. It suggests a thoughtful hermeneutic that is simultaneously faithful to ancestral traditions and open to the contributions of all thoughtful individuals and groups within a diverse society.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000