Search results for 'Jiří Adámek' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jiří Adámek (2004). On Quasivarieties and Varieties as Categories. Studia Logica 78 (1-2):7 - 33.score: 240.0
    Finitary quasivarieties are characterized categorically by the existence of colimits and of an abstractly finite, regularly projective regular generator G. Analogously, infinitary quasivarieties are characterized: one drops the assumption that G be abstractly finite. For (finitary) varieties the characterization is similar: the regular generator is assumed to be exactly projective, i.e., hom(G, –) is an exact functor. These results sharpen the classical characterization theorems of Lawvere, Isbell and other authors.
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  2. Jiří Adámek, Alan H. Mekler, Evelyn Nelson & Jan Reiterman (1988). On the Logic of Continuous Algebras. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 29 (3):365-380.score: 240.0
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  3. J. Adámek, P. T. Johnstone, J. A. Makowsky & J. Rosický (1997). Finitary Sketches. Journal of Symbolic Logic 62 (3):699-707.score: 30.0
    Finitary sketches, i.e., sketches with finite-limit and finite-colimit specifications, are proved to be as strong as geometric sketches, i.e., sketches with finite-limit and arbitrary colimit specifications. Categories sketchable by such sketches are fully characterized in the infinitary first-order logic: they are axiomatizable by σ-coherent theories, i.e., basic theories using finite conjunctions, countable disjunctions, and finite quantifications. The latter result is absolute; the equivalence of geometric and finitary sketches requires (in fact, is equivalent to) the non-existence of measurable cardinals.
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  4. Philip M. Adamek (2004). Review of “Heidegger and Derrida on Philosophy and Metaphor: Imperfect Thought”. [REVIEW] Essays in Philosophy 5 (1):2.score: 30.0
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  5. David Marimón, Tomasz Adamek, Kerstin Göllner & Carlos Domingo (2010). Reconocimiento visual móvil: el futuro de la realidad aumentada móvil. Telos: Cuadernos de Comunicación E Innovación 84:10-12.score: 30.0
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  6. Mateusz Adamek (2008). Fundamentalne teorie empiryczne w ujęciu Wittgensteina. Ruch Filozoficzny 4 (4).score: 30.0
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  7. P. Adamek (2003). Hegel's Concept of Evil in The'Elements of the Philosophy of Right'. Filosoficky Casopis 51 (2):255-273.score: 30.0
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  8. Heather Dyke (2006). Review of Jiri Benovsky, Persistence Through Time, and Across Possible Worlds. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (9).score: 15.0
  9. John Boardman (1975). Jiri Frel: Panathenaic Prize Amphoras. Pp. 32; 34 Figs.Ingeborg Scheibler: The Archaic Cemetery. Pp. 32; 29 Figs. (Kerameikos Books, Nos. 2, 3.) Athens: Esperos, 1973. Paper. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 25 (02):325-.score: 15.0
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  10. Frederick Kirschenmann (2010). Scott J. Peters, Nicholas R. Jordan, Margaret Adamek, Theodore R. Alter (Eds): Engaging Campus and Community. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 23 (3):309-311.score: 15.0
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  11. Andreas Philippopoulos-Mihalopoulos (2008). Jiří Přibáň, Legal Symbolism: On Law, Time and European Identity. [REVIEW] International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 21 (2):185-188.score: 15.0
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  12. R. M. Baer (1971). Review: Jiri Becvar, A Universal Turing Machine with a Programming Tape. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 36 (3):535-535.score: 15.0
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  13. Stephen A. Cook (1971). Review: Jiri Becvar, Real-Time and Complexity Problems in Automata Theory. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 36 (2):346-346.score: 15.0
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  14. B. A. Cagln (1968). R. 1701—1850 Je Uvedena V History of Modern Criticism R. Wellka). Je Dëlena Jiri Веска Marxismus a Otázky Axiolögie. Estetika 5:80.score: 15.0
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  15. J. Gabriel & J. Smajs (1985). In Honor of Cetl, Jiri 70th Birthday. Filosoficky Casopis 33 (6):923-924.score: 15.0
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  16. P. Glombicek (2003). A Note on Jan Kunes's and Jiri Pechar's Discussion on the Czech Translation of the Kantian Term" Verstand". Filosoficky Casopis 51 (5):875-880.score: 15.0
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  17. V. Grulich (1987). Anniversary of Zeman, Jiri. Filosoficky Casopis 35 (1):152-153.score: 15.0
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  18. T. Hanzawa (2003). The Meaning of Liberalism: East and West. Edited by Zdenek Suda and Jiri Musil. The European Legacy 8 (4):518-518.score: 15.0
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  19. Michael Heidelberger (2010). Wackermann, Jiří (Ed.). Philosophical Psychology 23 (2).score: 15.0
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  20. J. Kunes (2003). Jiri Pechar and His Criticism of the Traditional Translation on the Kantian Term" Verstand". Filosoficky Casopis 51 (1):119-129.score: 15.0
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  21. Jean-Francois Rozepře Lyotard (forthcoming). Přeložil Jiří Pechar. 1. Vyd. Praha. Filosofia.score: 15.0
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  22. Klaus Neugebauer (2011). Lorenz Engell, Jiri Bystrický, Katherina Krtilová (Hg.)-Medien denken. Von der Bewegung des Begriffs zu bewegten Bildern. Philosophischer Literaturanzeiger 64 (2):189.score: 15.0
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  23. J. Pechar (2003). Jiri Pechar and His Criticism of the Traditional Translation on the Kantian Term" Verstand"-A Reply. Filosoficky Casopis 51 (3):471-475.score: 15.0
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  24. David Peroutka (2013). A Reply to the Comments of Jiri Vacha. Filosoficky Casopis 61 (3):435-438.score: 15.0
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  25. Christian Raffensperger (2012). Jiří Macháček, The Rise of Medieval Towns and States in East Central Europe: Early Medieval Centres as Social and Economic Systems. (East Central and Eastern Europe in the Middle Ages, 450–1450, 10.) Trans. Miloš Bartǒn. Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2010. Pp. Xxii, 562; 139 Figs. $246. ISBN: 9789004182080. [REVIEW] Speculum 87 (2):581-582.score: 15.0
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  26. Iva Rosario (2008). Barbara Drake Boehm and Jiří Fajt, Eds., Prague: The Crown of Bohemia, 1347–1437. New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art; New Haven, Conn., and London: Yale University Press, 2005. Pp. Xviii, 366; Color Frontispiece, Many Black-and-White and Color Figures, 1 Genealogical Table, and Color Maps. [REVIEW] Speculum 83 (1):175-177.score: 15.0
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  27. Ludwig Wittgenstein (forthcoming). Filosofická Zkoumání. Translated by Jiří Pechar. 2., Upr. Vyd. Praha. Filosofia.score: 15.0
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  28. Jiri Benovsky (2008). The Bundle Theory and the Substratum Theory: Deadly Enemies or Twin Brothers? Philosophical Studies 141 (2):175 - 190.score: 3.0
    In this paper, I explore several versions of the bundle theory and the substratum theory and compare them, with the surprising result that it seems to be true that they are equivalent (in a sense of ‘equivalent’ to be specified). In order to see whether this is correct or not, I go through several steps: first, I examine different versions of the bundle theory with tropes and compare them to the substratum theory with tropes by going through various standard objections (...)
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  29. Matteo Morganti (2009). Are the Bundle Theory and the Substratum Theory Really Twin Brothers? Axiomathes 19 (1):73--85.score: 3.0
    In a recent paper, Jiri Benovsky argues that the bundle theory and the substratum theory, traditionally regarded as ‘deadly enemies’ in the metaphysics literature, are in fact ‘twin brothers’. That is, they turn out to be ‘equivalent for all theoretical purposes’ upon analysis. The only exception, according to Benovsky, is a particular version of the bundle theory whose distinguishing features render unappealing. In the present reply article, I critically analyse these undoubtedly relevant claims, and reject them.
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  30. Jiri Benovsky (2008). Two Concepts of Possible Worlds – or Only One? Theoria 74 (4):318-330.score: 3.0
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  31. Jiri Benovsky (2011). The Relationist and Substantivalist Theories of Time: Foes or Friends? European Journal of Philosophy 19 (4):491-506.score: 3.0
    Abstract: There are two traditionally rival views about the nature of time: substantivalism that takes time to be a substance that exists independently of events located in it, and relationism that takes time to be constructed out of events. In this paper, first, I want to make some progress with respect to the debate between these two views, and I do this mainly by examining the strategies they use to face the possibilities of ‘empty time’ and ‘time without change’. As (...)
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  32. Jiri Benovsky (2009). Presentism and Persistence. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 90 (3):291-309.score: 3.0
    In this paper, I examine various theories of persistence through time under presentism. In Part I, I argue that both perdurantist views (namely, the worm view and the stage view) suffer, in combination with presentism, from serious difficulties and should be rejected. In Part II, I discuss the presentist endurantist view, to see that it does avoid the difficulties of the perdurantist views, and consequently that it does work, but at a price that some may consider as being very high: (...)
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  33. Jiri Benovsky (2013). From Experience to Metaphysics: On Experience‐Based Intuitions and Their Role in Metaphysics. Noûs 47 (3).score: 3.0
    Metaphysical theories are often counter-intuitive. But they also often are strongly supported and motivated by intuitions. One way or another, the link between intuitions and metaphysics is a strong and important one, and there is hardly any metaphysical discussion where intuitions do not play a crucial role. In this article, I will be interested in a particular kind of such intuitions, namely those that come, at least partly, from experience. There seems to be a route from experience to metaphysics, and (...)
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  34. Jiri Benovsky (2009). Eternalist Theories of Persistence Through Time: Where the Differences Really Lie. Axiomathes 19 (1):51-71.score: 3.0
    The eternalist endurantist and perdurantist theories of persistence through time come in various versions, namely the two versions of perdurantism: the worm view and the stage view , and the two versions of endurantism: indexicalism and adverbialism . Using as a starting point the instructive case of what is depicted by photographs, I will examine these four views, and compare them, with some interesting results. Notably, we will see that two traditional enemies—the perdurantist worm view and the endurantist theories—are more (...)
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  35. Dieter Vaitl, Niels Birbaumer, John Gruzelier, Graham A. Jamieson, Boris Kotchoubey, Andrea Kübler, Dietrich Lehmann, Wolfgang H. R. Miltner, Ulrich Ott, Peter Pütz, Gebhard Sammer, Inge Strauch, Ute Strehl, Jiri Wackermann & Thomas Weiss (2005). Psychobiology of Altered States of Consciousness. Psychological Bulletin 131 (1):98-127.score: 3.0
  36. Jiri Benovsky (2010). Relational and Substantival Ontologies, and the Nature and the Role of Primitives in Ontological Theories. Erkenntnis 73 (1):101 - 121.score: 3.0
    Several metaphysical debates have typically been modeled as oppositions between a relationist approach and a substantivalist approach. Such debates include the Bundle Theory and the Substratum Theory about ordinary material objects, the Bundle (Humean) Theory and the Substance (Cartesian) Theory of the Self, and Relationism and Substantivalism about time. In all three debates, the substantivalist side typically insists that in order to provide a good treatment of the subject-matter of the theory (time, Self, material objects), it is necessary to postulate (...)
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  37. Jiri Benovsky (2006). Persistence Through Time and Across Possible Worlds. Ontos Verlag.score: 3.0
    How do ordinary objects persist through time and across possible worlds ? How do they manage to have their temporal and modal properties ? These are the questions adressed in this book which is a "guided tour of theories of persistence". The book is divided in two parts. In the first, the two traditional accounts of persistence through time (endurantism and perdurantism) are combined with presentism and eternalism to yield four different views, and their variants. The resulting views are then (...)
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  38. Jiri Benovsky (2009). On (Not) Being in Two Places at the Same Time: An Argument Against Endurantism. American Philosophical Quarterly 46 (3):239 - 248.score: 3.0
    Is there an entity such that it can be in two places at the same time ? According to one traditional view, properties can, since they are immanent universals. But what about objects such as a person or a table ? Common sense seems to say that, unlike properties, objects are not multiply locatable. In this paper, I will argue first of all that endurantism entails a consequence that is quite bizarre, namely, that objects are universals, while properties are particulars. (...)
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  39. Jiri Benovsky (2009). The Self : A Humean Bundle and/or a Cartesian Substance ? European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 5 (1):7 - 19.score: 3.0
    Is the self a substance, as Descartes thought, or is it 'only' a bundle of perceptions, as Hume thought ? In this paper I will examine these two views, especially with respect to two central features that have played a central role in the discussion, both of which can be quickly and usefully explained if one puts them as an objection to the bundle view. First, friends of the substance view have insisted that only if one conceives of the self (...)
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  40. Jiri Benovsky (forthcoming). I Am a Lot of Things: A Pluralistic Account of the Self. Metaphysica, An International Journal for Ontology and Metaphysics.score: 3.0
    When I say that I am a lot of things, I mean it literally and metaphysically speaking. The Self, or so I shall argue, is a plurality (notwithstanding the fact that ordinary language takes "the Self" to be a singular term – but, after all, language is only language). It is not a substance or a substratum, and it is not a collection or a bundle. The view I wish to advocate for is a kind of reductionism, in line with (...)
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  41. Jiri Benovsky (2012). Aesthetic Supervenience Vs. Aesthetic Grounding. Estetika 49 (2):166–178.score: 3.0
    The claim that the having of aesthetic properties supervenes on the having of non-aesthetic properties has been widely discussed and, in various ways, defended. In this paper, I will show that even if it is sometimes true that a supervenience relation holds between aesthetic properties and the 'subvenient' non-aesthetic ones, it is not the interesting relation in the neighbourhood. As we shall see, a richer, asymmetric and irreflexive relation is required, and I shall defend the claim that the more-and-more-popular relation (...)
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  42. Jiri Benovsky (2008). There Are Vague Objects (in Any Sense in Which There Are Ordinary Objects). Studia Philosophica Estonica 1 (3):1-4.score: 3.0
    Ordinary objects are vague, because either (i) composition is restricted, or (ii) there really are no such objects (but we still want to talk about them), or (iii) because such objects are not metaphysically (independently of us) distinguishable from other 'extra-ordinary' objects. In any sense in which there are ordinary objects, they are vague.
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  43. Jiri Benovsky (2012). The Causal Efficiency of the Passage of Time. Philosophia 40 (4):763-769.score: 3.0
    Does mere passage of time have causal powers ? Are properties like "being n days past" causally efficient ? A pervasive intuition among metaphysicians seems to be that they don't. Events and/or objects change, and they cause or are caused by other events and/or objects; but one does not see how just the mere passage of time could cause any difference in the world. In this paper, I shall discuss a case where it seems that mere passage of time does (...)
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  44. Jiri Benovsky (2013). Primitiveness, Metaontology, and Explanatory Power. Dialogue 52 (2):341-358.score: 3.0
    Metaphysical theories heavily rely on the use of primitives to which they typically appeal. I will start by examining and evaluating some traditional well-known theories and I will discuss the role of primitives in metaphysical theories in general. I will then turn to a discussion of claims of between theories that, I think, depend on equivalences of primitives, and I will explore the nature of primitives. I will then claim that almost all explanatory power of metaphysical theories comes from their (...)
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  45. Jiri Benovsky (2011). Vagueness : A Statistical Epistemicist Approach. Teorema (3):97-112.score: 3.0
    There are three main traditional accounts of vagueness : one takes it as a genuinely metaphysical phenomenon, one takes it as a phenomenon of ignorance, and one takes it as a linguistic or conceptual phenomenon. In this paper I first very briefly present these views, especially the epistemicist and supervaluationist strategies, and shortly point to some well-known problems that the views carry. I then examine a 'statistical epistemicist' account of vagueness that is designed to avoid precisely these problems – it (...)
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  46. Jiri Benovsky (2012). Photographic Representation and Depiction of Temporal Extension. Inquiry 55 (2):194-213.score: 3.0
    The main task of this paper is to understand if and how static images like photographs can represent and/or depict temporal extension (duration). In order to do this, a detour will be necessary to understand some features of the nature of photographic representation and depiction in general. This important detour will enable us to see that photographs (can) have a narrative content, and that the skilled photographer can 'tell a story' in a very clear sense, as well as control and (...)
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  47. Jiri Benovsky (2014). Vague Objects with Sharp Boundaries. Ratio 27 (1).score: 3.0
    In this article I shall consider two seemingly contradictory claims: first, the claim that everybody who thinks that there are ordinary objects has to accept that they are vague, and second, the claim that everybody has to accept the existence of sharp boundaries to ordinary objects. The purpose of this article is of course not to defend a contradiction. Indeed, there is no contradiction because the two claims do not concern the same ‘everybody’. The first claim, that all ordinary objects (...)
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  48. Jiri Benovsky (2011). Endurance, Perdurance, and Metaontology. SATS: Northern European Journal of Philosophy (2):159-177.score: 3.0
    The recent debate in metaontology gave rise to several types of (more or less classical) answers to questions about "equivalences" between metaphysical theories and to the question whether metaphysical disputes are substantive or merely verbal (i.e. various versions of realism, strong anti-realism, moderate anti-realism, or epistemicism). In this paper, I want to do two things. First, I shall have a close look at one metaphysical debate that has been the target and center of interest of many meta-metaphysicians, namely the problem (...)
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  49. Jiri Benovsky (2011). What Photographs Are (and What They Are Not). Disputatio 4 (31):239 - 254.score: 3.0
    For the metaphysician, photographs are very puzzling entities indeed. And even from the non-philosopher's intuitive point of view, it is not that clear what sort of thing a photograph is. Typically, if a client wants to purchase a photograph, she can mean very different things by 'buying a photograph' : she can mean to buy a print or a number of prints, or she can mean to buy a negative (when traditional film photographs are concerned) or a file (when digital (...)
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  50. Jiri Benovsky (2006). A Modal Bundle Theory. Metaphysica 7 (2).score: 3.0
    If ordinary particulars are bundles of properties, and if properties are said to be universals, then three well-known objections arise : no particular can change, all particulars have all of their properties essentially (even the most insignificant ones), and there cannot be two numerically distinct but qualitatively indiscernible particulars. In this paper, I try to make a little headway on these issues and see how the objections can be met, if one accepts a certain view about persistence through time and (...)
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