Search results for 'Jill Scott' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  8
    Jill Scott, Love and Sex: A Threesome.
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  2.  44
    Dominic Scott (1999). Aristotle on Well-Being and Intellectual Contemplation: Dominic Scott. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 73 (1):225–242.
    [David Charles] Aristotle, it appears, sometimes identifies well-being (eudaimonia) with one activity (intellectual contemplation), sometimes with several, including ethical virtue. I argue that this appearance is misleading. In the Nicomachean Ethics, intellectual contemplation is the central case of human well-being, but is not identical with it. Ethically virtuous activity is included in human well-being because it is an analogue of intellectual contemplation. This structure allows Aristotle to hold that while ethically virtuous activity is valuable in its own right, the best (...)
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  3. Hannah Camplin & Emma Scott (2015). “We Are a Group of Feminist Lawyers Doing What We Can”: An Interview with Emma Scott, Director of Rights of Women. Feminist Legal Studies 23 (3):319-328.
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  4.  11
    Mary Scott (1996). Scott Adams. Business Ethics 10 (4):26-29.
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  5.  5
    William T. Scott (1981). Report From Bill Scott On Polanyi Biography. Tradition and Discovery 8 (2):2-3.
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  6.  4
    Drusilla Scott (1986). Scott Replies to Harker Letter. Tradition and Discovery 14 (2):25-26.
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  7.  5
    Kathryn P. Scott & Deborah Martin Floyd (1991). Floyd and Scott, From Page 13. Inquiry 8 (4):26-26.
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  8.  1
    Charles E. Scott (1968). Schleiermacher and the Problem of Divine Immediacy: CHARLES E. SCOTT. Religious Studies 3 (2):499-512.
    A problem which was widely recognised during Schleiermacher's life, and one which I think is not yet satisfactorily solved, concerned the integration of feeling and concepts within human consciousness. Within the domain of philosophy of religion it may be phrased as follows: How does religious feeling relate to rational reflection such that each complements and enriches the other? Schleiermacher was convinced that religion never originates in human understanding or autonomy and that one's understanding of the world is not necessarily dependent (...)
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  9. Scott Adams & Mary Scott (1996). Scott Adams. Business Ethics: The Magazine of Corporate Responsibility 10 (4):26-29.
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  10. Jo Xuereb Brennan & Walter Scott (2014). Sir Walter Scott in Malta. The Chesterton Review 40 (1):247-248.
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  11. C. B. Cohen, S. E. Wheeler & D. A. Scott (2000). Prayer is Therapy-Cynthia B. Cohen, Sondra E. Wheeler, and David A. Scott Reply. Hastings Center Report 30 (6):5-5.
     
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  12. Joan Wallach Scott (1995). A Response to Joan Wallach Scott. In Jeffrey Williams (ed.), Pc Wars: Politics and Theory in the Academy. Routledge
     
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  13. D. A. Scott (1989). Manichaean Responses to Zoroastrianism. *: D. A. SCOTT. Religious Studies 25 (4):435-457.
    Justice will once take the place which the Magians are keeping now, for it is they who lord it over the world.
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  14.  13
    Joan W. Scott (1991). The Evidence of Experience. Critical Inquiry 17 (4):773-797.
    There is a section in Samuel Delany’s magnificent autobiographical meditation, The Motion of Light in Water, that dramatically raises the problem of writing the history of difference, the history, that is, of the designation of “other,” of the attribution of characteristics that distinguish categories of people from some presumed norm.1 Delany recounts his reaction to his first visit to the St. Marks bathhouse in 1963. He remembers standing on the threshold of a “gym-sized room” dimly lit by blue bulbs. The (...)
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  15.  57
    Gualtiero Piccinini & Sam Scott (2006). Splitting Concepts. Philosophy of Science 73 (4):390-409.
    A common presupposition in the concepts literature is that concepts constitute a singular natural kind. If, on the contrary, concepts split into more than one kind, this literature needs to be recast in terms of other kinds of mental representation. We offer two new arguments that concepts, in fact, divide into different kinds: ( a ) concepts split because different kinds of mental representation, processed independently, must be posited to explain different sets of relevant phenomena; ( b ) concepts split (...)
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  16.  2
    Charles E. Scott (1990). The Question of Ethics: Nietzsche, Foucault, Heidegger. Indiana University Press.
    "... stimulating and insightful... a thoroughly researched and timely contribution to the secondary literature of ethics... " —Library Journal "His important new work establishes Scott... as one of the foremost interpreters of the Continental philosophical tradition of the US.... Necessary for anyone working in ethics or the Continental tradition." —Choice "... a provocative discourse on the consequences of the ethical in the thought of Nietzsche, Foucault, and Heidegger." —The Journal of Religion Charles E. Scott's challenging book advances the (...)
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  17.  11
    Thomas R. Scott (2012). Neuroscience May Supersede Ethics and Law. Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (3):433-437.
    Abstract Advances in technology now make it possible to monitor the activity of the human brain in action, however crudely. As this emerging science continues to offer correlations between neural activity and mental functions, mind and brain may eventually prove to be one. If so, such a full comprehension of the electrochemical bases of mind may render current concepts of ethics, law, and even free will irrelevant. Content Type Journal Article Category Original Paper Pages 1-5 DOI 10.1007/s11948-012-9351-1 Authors Thomas R. (...)
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  18. Charles E. Scott (2007). Living with Indifference. Indiana University Press.
    Living with Indifference is about the dimension of life that is utterly neutral, without care, feeling, or personality. In this provocative work that is anything but indifferent, Charles E. Scott explores the ways people have spoken and thought about indifference. Exploring topics such as time, chance, beauty, imagination, violence, and virtue, Scott shows how affirming indifference can be beneficial, and how destructive consequences can occur when we deny it. Scott’s preoccupation with indifference issues a (...)
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  19. Stuart R. Hameroff & A. C. Scott (1998). A Sonoran Afternoon: A Dialogue on Quantum Mechanics and Consciousness. In Stuart R. Hameroff, Alfred W. Kaszniak & A. C. Scott (eds.), Toward a Science of Consciousness II. MIT Press
    _Sonoran Desert, Stuart Hameroff and Alwyn Scott awoke from their_ _siestas to take margaritas in the shade of a ramada. On a nearby_ _table, a tape recorder had accidentally been left on and the following_ _is an unedited transcript of their conversation._.
     
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  20. Andrew Scott (2013). Legal Responses to Some of the New Developments in Reproductive Technologies Part.3 The Future of Reproductive Technologies and the Law. Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 8 (2):24 - 28.
    Legal Responses to some of the New Developments in Reproductive Technologies Part.3 The Future of Reproductive Technologies and the Law Content Type Journal Article Pages 24-28 Authors Andrew Scott, L.L.B., University of Aberdeen, Scotland Journal Human Reproduction & Genetic Ethics Online ISSN 2043-0469 Print ISSN 1028-7825 Journal Volume Volume 8 Journal Issue Volume 8, Number 2 / 2002.
     
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  21. Henry G. Liddell & Robert Scott (forthcoming). Rhuthmos. Rhuthmos.
    H. G. Liddell & R. Scott, A Greek-English Lexicon, rev. and aug. by Sir H. S. Jones. with the ass. of R. McKenzie, Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1940. ῥυθμός , Ion. ῥυσμός (v. infr. 111, IV), ὁ : (ῥέω) :— A. any regular recurring motion (“πᾶς ῥ. ὡρισμένῃ μετρεῖται κινήσει” Arist.Pr.882b2) : I. measured motion, time, whether in sound or motion, Democr.15c ; = ἡ τῆς κινήσεως τάξις, Pl.Lg.665a, cf. 672e ; “ὁ ῥ. ἐκ τοῦ ταχέος (...) - Études (...)
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  22.  50
    David Scott (2007). Critical Essays on Major Curriculum Theorists. Routledge.
    This volume offers a critical appreciation of the work of 16 leading curriculum theorists through critical expositions of their writings. Written by a leading name in Curriculum Studies, the book includes a balance of established curriculum thinkers and contemporary curriculum analysts from education as well as philosophy, sociology and psychology. With theorists from the UK, the US and Europe, there is also a spread of political perspectives from radical conservatism through liberalism to socialism and libertarianism. Theorists included are: John (...)
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  23. Charles E. Scott, Susan Schoenbohm, Daniela Vallega-Neu & Alejandro Arturo Vallega (eds.) (2001). Companion to Heidegger's Contributions to Philosophy. Indiana University Press.
    Companion to Heidegger’s Contributions to Philosophy Edited by Charles E. Scott, Susan Schoenbohm, Daniela Vallega-Neu, and Alejandro Vallega A key to unlocking one of Heidegger’s most difficult and important works. The publication of the first English translation of Martin Heidegger’s Beiträge zur Philosophie marked a significant event for Heidegger studies. Considered by scholars to be his most important work after Being and Time, Contributions to Philosophy elaborates what Heidegger calls "being-historical-thinking," a project in which he undertakes to reshape (...)
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  24. Dominic Scott (2015). Levels of Argument: A Comparative Study of Plato's Republic and Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics. OUP Oxford.
    Dominic Scott compares the Republic and Nicomachean Ethics from a methodological perspective. He argues that Plato and Aristotle distinguish similar levels of argument in the defence of justice, and that they both follow the same approach: Plato because he thinks it will suffice, Aristotle because he thinks there is no need to go beyond it.
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  25. Charles E. Scott (2007). Living with Indifference. Indiana University Press.
    Living with Indifference is about the dimension of life that is utterly neutral, without care, feeling, or personality. In this provocative work that is anything but indifferent, Charles E. Scott explores the ways people have spoken and thought about indifference. Exploring topics such as time, chance, beauty, imagination, violence, and virtue, Scott shows how affirming indifference can be beneficial, and how destructive consequences can occur when we deny it. Scott’s preoccupation with indifference issues a (...)
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  26. Charles E. Scott (2007). Living with Indifference. Indiana University Press.
    Living with Indifference is about the dimension of life that is utterly neutral, without care, feeling, or personality. In this provocative work that is anything but indifferent, Charles E. Scott explores the ways people have spoken and thought about indifference. Exploring topics such as time, chance, beauty, imagination, violence, and virtue, Scott shows how affirming indifference can be beneficial, and how destructive consequences can occur when we deny it. Scott’s preoccupation with indifference issues a (...)
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  27. Charles E. Scott (2002). The Lives of Things. Indiana University Press.
    "Like Foucault and Levinas before him, though in very different ways, Scott makes an oblique incision into phenomenology... [it is] the kind of book to which people dazed by the specters of nihilism will be referred by those in the know." —David Wood "... refreshing and original." —Edward S. Casey In The Lives of Things, Charles E. Scott reconsiders our relationships with ordinary, everyday things and our capacity to engage them in their particularity. He takes up (...)
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  28. Charles E. Scott (2002). The Lives of Things. Indiana University Press.
    "Like Foucault and Levinas before him, though in very different ways, Scott makes an oblique incision into phenomenology... [it is] the kind of book to which people dazed by the specters of nihilism will be referred by those in the know." —David Wood "... refreshing and original." —Edward S. Casey In The Lives of Things, Charles E. Scott reconsiders our relationships with ordinary, everyday things and our capacity to engage them in their particularity. He takes up (...)
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  29. Edwin E. Slosson, Walter Dill Scott, Frederick Shipp Deibler, Willard Eugene Hotchkiss & Stuart Chase (eds.) (1929). Society Today. New York, D. Van Nostrand Company, Inc..
    --The energy of the new world, By E. E. Slosson.--The new energies and the new man, by W. D. Scott.--The future of our economic system, by F S. Deibler.--Business in the new era, by W. B. Hotchkiss.--Consumers in the modern world, by Stuart Chase.
     
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  30. Robert Zaretsky & John T. Scott (2010). The Philosophers' Quarrel: Rousseau, Hume, and the Limits of Human Understanding. Yale University Press.
    The rise and spectacular fall of the friendship between the two great philosophers of the eighteenth century, barely six months after they first met, reverberated on both sides of the Channel. As the relationship between Jean-Jacques Rousseau and David Hume unraveled, a volley of rancorous letters was fired off, then quickly published and devoured by aristocrats, intellectuals, and common readers alike. Everyone took sides in this momentous dispute between the greatest of Enlightenment thinkers. In this lively and revealing book, Robert (...)
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  31.  5
    Scott Stapleford (2011). Tom Sorell, G. A. J. Rogers, and Jill Kraye, Eds. , 'Scientia' in Early Modern Philosophy: Seventeenth-Century Thinkers on Demonstrative Knowledge From First Principles . Reviewed By. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 30 (6):438-441.
  32. Scott Stapleford (2010). Tom Sorell, G.A.J. Rogers, and Jill Kraye, Eds., ‘Scientia’ in Early Modern Philosophy: Seventeenth-Century Thinkers on Demonstrative Knowledge From First Principles. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 30:438-441.
     
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  33. J. Simner, C. Mulvenna, N. Sagiv, E. Tsakanikos, S. A. Witherby, C. Fraser, K. Scott & J. Ward (2006). Synaesthesia: The Prevalence of Atypical Cross-Modal Experiences. Perception 35 (8):1024-33.
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  34.  63
    Zoltán Dienes & Ryan Scott (2005). Measuring Unconscious Knowledge: Distinguishing Structural Knowledge and Judgment Knowledge. Psychological Research/Psychologische Forschung 69 (5):338-351.
  35.  14
    Stuart R. Hameroff, Alfred W. Kaszniak & A. C. Scott (eds.) (1996). Toward a Science of Consciousness: The First Tucson Discussions and Debates. MIT Press.
    Toward a Science of Consciousnessmarks the first major gathering -- a landmark event -- devoted entirely to unlocking the mysteries of consciousness.
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  36.  9
    A. C. Scott (1995). Stairway to the Mind: The Controversial New Science of Consciousness. Springer.
    The book is aimed at general readers with an interest in the mind and neuroscience, as well as a wide range of scientists whose work is related to the rapidly...
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  37.  31
    M. Scott (2001). Tactual Perception. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 79 (2):149-160.
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  38.  85
    Michael Scott (2007). Distinguishing the Senses. Philosophical Explorations 10 (3):257 – 262.
    Seeing, hearing and touching are phenomenally different, even if we are detecting the same spatial properties with each sense. This presents a prima facie problem for intentionalism, the theory that phenomenal character supervenes on representational content. The paper reviews some attempts to resolve this problem, and then looks in detail at Peter Carruthers' recent proposal that the senses can be individuated by the way in which they represent spatial properties and incorporate time. This proposal is shown to be ineffective in (...)
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  39.  64
    A. C. Scott (2003). On Quantum Theories of the Mind. In Naoyuki Osaka (ed.), Journal of Consciousness Studies. John Benjamins 5-6.
    In response to recent suggestions that the phenomena of consciousness may be related to those described by quantum theory, it is argued that distinctive features of brain activity are more typical of nonlinear classical dynamics than of quantum dynamics, which is a linear theory. Thus natural scientists should turn to hierarchies of nonlinear classical systems rather than quantum theory for explanations of the brain's mysterious behaviour.
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  40.  45
    A. C. Scott (2004). Reductionism Revisited. Journal of Consciousness Studies 11 (2):51-68.
    From the perspective of nonlinear science, it is argued that one may accept physicalism and reject substance dualism without being forced into reductionism. This permits a property dualism under which biological and mental phenomena may emerge from intricate positive feedback networks, involving many levels of both the biological and cognitive hierarchies.
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  41.  14
    Charles E. Scott (1977). Archetypes and Consciousness. Idealistic Studies 7 (January):28-49.
  42.  27
    Charles E. Scott (1971). Self-Consciousness Without an Ego. Man and World 4 (May):193-201.
  43.  16
    A. C. Scott (1998). Reductionism Revisited. In Stuart R. Hameroff, Alfred W. Kaszniak & A. C. Scott (eds.), Journal of Consciousness Studies. MIT Press 51-68.
    From the perspective of nonlinear science, it is argued that one may accept physicalism and reject substance dualism without being forced into reductionism. This permits a property dualism under which biological and mental phenomena may emerge from intricate positive feedback networks, involving many levels of both the biological and cognitive hierarchies.
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  44. A. C. Scott (2000). Modern Science and the Mind. In Max Velmans (ed.), Investigating Phenomenal Consciousness: New Methodologies and Maps. John Benjamins 215--232.
  45. Dana S. Scott (1990). The Computational Conception of Mind in Acting and Reflecting: The Interdisciplinary Turn. In Philosophy. Norwell: Kluwer
     
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  46.  9
    Andrew Norris (2013). 'How Can It Not Know What It Is?': Self and Other in Ridley Scott's Blade Runner. Film-Philosophy 17 (1):19-50.
    In this essay I provide a reading of Ridley Scott's Blade Runner that focuses upon the question of the kind of creatures the Replicants are depicted as being, and the meaning that depiction should have for us. I draw upon Stanley Cavell's account of the problem of other minds to argue that the empathy test is in fact a mode of resisting the acknowledgment of others. And I draw upon Martin Heidegger's account of authenticity and mortality to argue that (...)
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  47.  6
    Christina Goddard (2016). Improving a Bounding Result That Constructs Models of High Scott Rank. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 57 (1):59-71.
    Let $T$ be a theory in a countable fragment of $\mathcal{L}_{\omega_{1},\omega}$ whose extensions in countable fragments have only countably many types. Sacks proves a bounding theorem that generates models of high Scott rank. For this theorem, a tree hierarchy is developed for $T$ that enumerates these extensions. In this paper, we effectively construct a predecessor function for formulas defining types in this tree hierarchy as follows. Let $T_{\gamma}\subseteq T_{\delta}$ with $T_{\gamma}$- and $T_{\delta}$-theories on level $\gamma$ and $\delta$, respectively. (...)
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  48. Kirk Ludwig (2012). What Role Should Propositions Have in the Theory of Meaning? Review Essay: Scott Soames. What is Meaning? Philosophia 40 (4):885-901.
    Critical review of Scott Soames's What is Meaning?
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  49.  14
    Gillman Payette & Peter K. Schotch (2014). Remarks on the Scott–Lindenbaum Theorem. Studia Logica 102 (5):1003-1020.
    In the late 1960s and early 1970s, Dana Scott introduced a kind of generalization (or perhaps simplification would be a better description) of the notion of inference, familiar from Gentzen, in which one may consider multiple conclusions rather than single formulas. Scott used this idea to good effect in a number of projects including the axiomatization of many-valued logics (of various kinds) and a reconsideration of the motivation of C.I. Lewis. Since he left the subject it has been (...)
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  50.  3
    Scott R. Rosas, Marie T. Cope, Christie Villa, Mahnaz Motevalli, Jill Utech & Jeffrey T. Schouten (2014). Assessing the Challenges of Multi-Scope Clinical Research Sites: An Example From Nih Hiv/Aids Clinical Trials Networks. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 20 (2):149-157.
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