Search results for 'Jillian Dutton' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jillian Dutton (1997). Raphael Sassower's Cultural Collisions. Social Epistemology 11 (1):131 – 136.score: 240.0
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  2. Denis Dutton (2010). The Art Instinct: Beauty, Pleasure, and Human Evolution. OUP Oxford.score: 60.0
    The Dinka have a connoisseur's appreciation of the patterns and colours of the markings on their cattle. The Japanese tea ceremony is regarded as a performance art. Some cultures produce carving but no drawing; others specialize in poetry. Yet despite the rich variety of artistic expression to be found across many cultures, we all share a deep sense of aesthetic pleasure. The need to create art of some form is found in every human society. -/- In The Art Instinct, Denis (...)
     
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  3. Denis Dutton, Artistic Crimes.score: 30.0
    The concept of forgery is a touchstone of criticism. If the existence of forgeries — and their occasional acceptance as authentic works of art — has been too often dismissed or ignored in the theory of criticism, it may be because of the forger’s special power to make the critic look ridiculous. Awkward as it is, critics have heaped the most lavish praise on art objects that have turned out to be forged. The suspicion this arouses is, of course, that (...)
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  4. Denis Dutton (1979). Artistic Crimes: The Problem of Forgery in the Arts. British Journal of Aesthetics 19 (4):302-314.score: 30.0
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  5. Denis Dutton (2006). A Naturalist Definition of Art. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 64 (3):367–377.score: 30.0
    Aesthetic theoriesmayclaim universality, but they are normally conditioned by the aesthetic issues and debates of their own times. Plato and Aristo- tle were motivated both to account for the Greek arts of their day and to connect aesthetics to their general metaphysics and theories of value. Closer to our time, asNo¨el Carroll observes, the theories of Clive Bell and R.G. Collingwood can be viewed as “defenses of emerging avant-garde practices— neoimpressionism, on the one hand, and the mod- ernist poetics of (...)
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  6. Denis Dutton (2001). Aesthetic Universals. In Berys Nigel Gaut & Dominic Lopes (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Aesthetics. Routledge. 203--214.score: 30.0
  7. Denis Dutton, Delusions of Postmodernism.score: 30.0
    That postmodernism is a general cultural mood and a style in art, architecture, and literature is uncontroversial. But does postmodernism present a coherent intellectual doctrine or theory of politics, art, or life? In the discussion which follows, I will concentrate on two aspects of the intellectual pretensions of postmodernism. First, I examine the postmodernist claim that to justify the idea that the postmodern world is characterized by a general indeterminacy of meaning. Next I will look at aspects of the (...)
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  8. Denis Dutton, Why Intentionalism Won't Go Away.score: 30.0
    Considering the philosophic intelligence that has set out to discredit it, intentionalism in critical interpretation has shown an uncanny resilience. Beginning perhaps most explicitly with the New Criticism, continuing through the analytic tradition in philosophy, and culminating most recently in deconstructionism, philosophers and literary theorists have kept under sustained attack the notion that authorial intention can provide a guide to interpretation, a criterion of textual meaning, or a standard for the validation of criticism. Yet intentionalist criticism still has avid theoretical (...)
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  9. Denis Dutton (2003). Aesthetics and Evolutionary Psychology. In Jerrold Levinson (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Aesthetics. Oup Oxford.score: 30.0
  10. Blake D. Dutton (2001). Al-Ghazālī on Possibility and the Critique of Causality. Medieval Philosophy and Theology 10 (1):23-46.score: 30.0
    One of the most striking features of speculative theology (kalaam) as it developed within the Ash'arite tradition of Islam is its denial of causal power to creatures. Much like Malebranche in the seventeenth century, the Ash'arites saw this denial as a natural extension of monotheism and were led as a result to embrace an occasionalist account of causality. According to their analysis, causal power is identical with creative power, and since God is the sole and sovereign creator, God is the (...)
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  11. Denis Dutton (2003). Authenticity in Art. In Jerrold Levinson (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Aesthetics. Oxford University Press. 258--274.score: 30.0
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  12. Kenneth Corvo, Donald Dutton & Wan-Yi Chen (2009). Do Duluth Model Interventions with Perpetrators of Domestic Violence Violate Mental Health Professional Ethics? Ethics and Behavior 19 (4):323 – 340.score: 30.0
    In spite of numerous studies of program outcomes finding little or no positive effect on violent behavior, the Duluth model remains the most common program type of interventions with perpetrators of domestic violence. In addition, Duluth model programs often ignore serious mental health and substance abuse issues present in perpetrators. These and other issues of possible threat to mental health professional ethics are reviewed in light of the court-mandated, compulsory nature of most Duluth model programs and client and victim expectations (...)
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  13. Denis Dutton, Forgery and Plagiarism.score: 30.0
    FORGERY and PLAGIARISM are both forms of fraud. In committing art forgery I claim my work is by another person. As a plagiarist, I claim another person’s work is my own. In forgery, someone’s name is stolen in order to add value to the wrong work; in plagiarism someone’s work is stolen in order to give credit to the wrong author.
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  14. Blake D. Dutton (2003). Descartes's Dualism and the One Principal Attribute Rule. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (3):395 – 415.score: 30.0
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  15. Blake D. Dutton, Benedict de Spinoza. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 30.0
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  16. Denis Dutton, Kitsch.score: 30.0
    “Kitsch” has sometimes been used (for example, by Harold Rosenberg) to refer to virtually any form of popular art or entertainment, especially when sentimental. But though much popular art is cheap and crude, it is at least direct and unpretentious. On the other hand, a persistent theme in the history of the usage of “kitsch,” going back to the word’s mid-European origins, is pretentiousness, especially in reference to objects that ape whatever is conventionally viewed as high art. As Arnold Hauser (...)
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  17. Denis Dutton, The Experience of Art is Paradise Regained: Kant on Free and Dependent Beauty.score: 30.0
    In the Critique of Judgment , Kant presents what is possibly the most powerful aesthetic theory ever devised. It is not the clearest, and even when it comes clear, it is only after much toil. But its contradictions and complexities — apparent or real — reflect and disclose to great depth the very complexities and paradoxes that infect our artistic and aesthetic lives. Later aestheticians have with greater sophistication directed attention to the social and historical aspects of institutionalised fine (...)
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  18. Denis Dutton (1994). Kant and the Conditions of Artistic Beauty. British Journal of Aesthetics 34 (3):226-239.score: 30.0
  19. Anthony J. Cascardi & Denis Dutton, Why Intentionalism Won't Go Away.score: 30.0
    Considering the philosophic intelligence that has set out to discredit it, intentionalism in critical interpretation has shown an uncanny resilience. Beginning perhaps most explicitly with the New Criticism, continuing through the analytic tradition in philosophy, and culminating most recently in deconstructionism, philosophers and literary theorists have kept under sustained attack the notion that authorial intention can provide a guide to interpretation, a criterion of textual meaning, or a standard for the validation of criticism. Yet intentionalist criticism still has avid theoretical (...)
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  20. Blake D. Dutton (1999). Physics and Metaphysics in Descartes and Galileo. Journal of the History of Philosophy 37 (1):49-71.score: 30.0
  21. Denis Dutton (1993). Tribal Art and Artifact. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 51 (1):13-21.score: 30.0
    Europeans seeking to understand tribal arts face obvious problems of comprehending the histories, values, and ideas of vastly remote cultures. In this respect the issues faced in understanding tribal art (or folk art, primitive art, traditional art, third or fourth-world art — none of these designations is ideal) are not much different from those encountered in trying to comprehend the distant art of “our own” culture, for instance, the art of medieval Europe. But in the case of tribal or so-called (...)
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  22. Denis Dutton (1977). Plausibility and Aesthetic Interpretation. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 7 (2):327 - 340.score: 30.0
    If a catalogue were made of terms commonly used to affirm the adequacy of critical interpretations of works of art, one word certain to be included would be “plausible.” Yet this term is one which has received precious little attention in the literature of aesthetics. This is odd, inasmuch as I find the notion of plausibility central to an understanding of the nature of criticism. “Plausible” is a perplexing term because it can have radically different meanings depending on the circumstances (...)
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  23. Wan-Yi Chen, Donald Dutton & Kenneth Corvo (2009). Do Duluth Model Interventions With Perpetrators of Domestic Violence Violate Mental Health Professional Ethics? Ethics and Behavior 19 (4):323-340.score: 30.0
    In spite of numerous studies of program outcomes finding little or no positive effect on violent behavior, the Duluth model remains the most common program type of interventions with perpetrators of domestic violence. In addition, Duluth model programs often ignore serious mental health and substance abuse issues present in perpetrators. These and other issues of possible threat to mental health professional ethics are reviewed in light of the court-mandated, compulsory nature of most Duluth model programs and client and victim expectations (...)
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  24. Denis Dutton (2004). The Pleasures of Fiction. Philosophy and Literature 28 (2):453-466.score: 30.0
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  25. Donald L. McCabe, Janet M. Dukerich & Jane E. Dutton (1991). Context, Values and Moral Dilemmas: Comparing the Choices of Business and Law School Students. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 10 (12):951 - 960.score: 30.0
    Much has been written about the ethics and values of today's business student, but this research has generally been characterized by a variety of methodological shortcomings — the use of convenience samples, a failure to establish the relevance of comparison groups employed, attempts to understand behavior in terms of unidimensional values preselected by the researcher, and the lack of well-designed longitudinal studies. The research reported here addresses many of these concerns by comparing the values and ethical decision making behavior of (...)
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  26. Denis Dutton, Han Van Meegeren.score: 30.0
    The most notorious and celebrated forger of the twentieth century, Han van Meegeren (1889-1947), was born in the Dutch town of Deventer. He was fascinated by drawing as a child, and pursued it despite his father’s disapproval, sometimes spending all his pocket money on art supplies. In high school he was able finally to receive professional instruction, and went on to study architecture, according to his father’s wishes. In 1911 he married Anna de Voogt. His artistic talents were recognized when (...)
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  27. Denis Dutton, Tribal Art.score: 30.0
    Tribal art , also termed ethnographic art or, in an expression seldom used today, primitive art , is the art of small-scale nonliterate societies. Some of the traditional artifacts to which the term refers may not be art in any obvious European sense, and many of the cultures where they occur may not strictly-speaking be tribal in social structure. The rubric nevertheless persists because the arts produced by small-scale cultures share significant elements in common. The tribal arts which have gained (...)
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  28. Denis Dutton (1974). To Understand It on its Own Terms. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 35 (2):246-256.score: 30.0
    We commonly hear it said that a work of art must be understood “on its own terms,” and that phrase is used in other contexts as well; people, especially people very different from ourselves, are said to have to be understood on their own terms. But what is the meaning of the expression “on its/their own terms?” Note that we do not say of every possible object of understanding that it must be understood on its own terms. The statement, “Chemistry (...)
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  29. Blake D. Dutton (1996). Indifference, Necessity, and Descartes's Derivation of the Laws of Motion. Journal of the History of Philosophy 34 (2):193-212.score: 30.0
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  30. Denis Dutton (1997). Writing Good, Bad, and Classic. Philosophy and Literature 21 (2):500-511.score: 30.0
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  31. Denis Dutton (1995). The Empire Writes Back, with a Vengeance. Philosophy and Literature 19 (1):198-205.score: 30.0
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  32. Denis Dutton, Art, Behavior, and the Anthropologists.score: 30.0
    DO SOCIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY STAND with the sciences or with the humanities? Most attempts to settle this question involve comparing these disciplines with the natural sciences on the one hand and with history on the other. If we take history as paradigmatic of the various forms of humanistic inquiry, we will certainly find many illuminating comparisons to be drawn between it and the social sciences, but history is not the only humanistic inquiry. In fact, there exists another whole realm of (...)
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  33. Denis Dutton, Art Hoaxes.score: 30.0
    As much as many other human enterprises, the art world today is fuelled by pride, greed, and ambition. Artists and art dealers hope for recognition and wealth, while art collectors often acquire works less for their intrinsic aesthetic merit than for their investment potential. In such a climate of values and desires, it is not surprising that poseurs and frauds will flourish. For works of painting and sculpture are material objects that derive their often immense monetary value generally from two (...)
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  34. Denis Dutton (2003). Darwin and Political Theory. Philosophy and Literature 27 (1):241-254.score: 30.0
    Evolutionary psychology has much to say about the origins of human political structures. Paul Rubin argues persuasively that given our hard-wired sociality, democracy is the best, most stable political arrangement we can hope for. He is correct in this view.
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  35. Denis Dutton, Freedom and the Theatre of Ideas.score: 30.0
    I want to address a number of interrelated issues that confront the modern theatre. My main concern is to ask, why should we have a theatre of ideas ? The theatre of entertainment is unproblematic: though it has an important place in cultural life, it is undemanding, having the essential purpose of amusement. The theatre of ideas, on the other hand, is a theatre that provokes us to think about morality, human relations, history, or politics. What place does a theatre (...)
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  36. Denis Dutton, Mythologies of Tribal Art.score: 30.0
    Forty years ago Roland Barthes defined a mythology as those “falsely obvious” ideas which an age so takes for granted that it is unaware of its own belief. An illustration of what he meant can be seen in his 1957 critique of the photographic exhibition, The Family of Man . Barthes declares that the myth it promotes stresses exoticism, complacently projecting a Babel of human diversity over the globe. From this image of diversity a pluralistic humanism “is magically produced: man (...)
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  37. Denis Dutton (1997). Please Shoot the Piano Player!: The Debate Over David Helfgott. Philosophy and Literature 21 (2):332-391.score: 30.0
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  38. Blake D. Dutton (2002). The Cambridge Companion to Augustine (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 40 (1):118-119.score: 30.0
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  39. Denis Dutton (2001). What is Genius? Philosophy and Literature 25 (1):181-196.score: 30.0
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  40. Denis Dutton (1990). Bookmarks. Philosophy and Literature 14 (2):446-454.score: 30.0
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  41. Denis Dutton (1995). Astrology, Computers, and the Volksgeist. Philosophy and Literature 19 (2):424-434.score: 30.0
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  42. Denis Dutton & Garry Hagberg (2002). War of the Worldviews. Philosophy and Literature 26 (1).score: 30.0
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  43. Denis Dutton (2000). Art and Sexual Selection. Philosophy and Literature 24 (2):512-521.score: 30.0
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  44. Blake D. Dutton (1993). The Ontological Argument. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 67 (4):431-450.score: 30.0
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  45. Denis Dutton (1992). Beauty Is Fun and Fun Beauty —or Is That All Ye Need to Know? Philosophy and Literature 16 (2):432-437.score: 30.0
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  46. Denis Dutton (1992). Decontextualized Crab; Nietzsche Dreams of Detroit. Philosophy and Literature 16 (1):239-249.score: 30.0
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  47. Denis Dutton, The Cold Reading Technique.score: 30.0
    That there is a sucker born every minute is the cynical slogan most often attributed to the great nineteenth-century circus entreprenuer Phineas Taylor Barnum. Though there is in fact no record that he ever made such a remark, Barnum did claim that his success depended on providing in his shows “a little something for everybody.” Both the cynicism and his recipe for success are relevant to understanding the persistent tendency for people to embrace fake personality descriptions as uniquely their own. (...)
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  48. Donald L. McCabe, Janet M. Dukerich & Jane Dutton (1993). Values and Moral Dilemmas. Business Ethics Quarterly 3 (2):117-130.score: 30.0
    M.B.A. programs in the United States continue to admit foreign students in record numbers, yet we know little about how this cultural diversity may impact the values and ethical decision making behavior of either American or foreign students. The research discussed here examined this issue within the context of a large M.B.A. program where non-U.S. citizens comprise over twenty percent of the student population. Comparisons of U.S. and Asian students supported existing notions about the independent vs. interdependent conceptions of the (...)
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  49. Gregory Currie & Denis Dutton (1985). The Forger's Art. Forgery and the Philosophy of Art. Philosophical Quarterly 35 (141):435.score: 30.0
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  50. D. Dutton (1984). Book Reviews : Sociological Explanation as Translation. BY STEPHEN P. TURNER. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1980. P. X + 110. $14.96 (Hardcover), $5.95 (Paper). [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 14 (4):581-582.score: 30.0
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