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  1. Jim Campbell (2010). Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy. The Pluralist 5 (1).
    Spring 2010Colleagues-As I hope you are aware, two major changes have occurred with the beginning of the 2010 SAAP membership cycle.First, the Society has ended its formal relationship with the Journal of Speculative Philosophy. This has been a good relationship for SAAP, resulting in the publication of the highlights of our annual meeting since 2003 and increasing the profile of the Society. I know that we are all grateful to the editors of JSP for these years of cooperative interaction, and (...)
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  2. Jim Campbell (2009). Letter From President Jim Campbell on the State of the Society. Newsletter of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 37 (108):4-4.
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  3. Jim Campbell & Gavin Davidson (2009). Coercion in the Community: A Situated Approach to the Examination of Ethical Challenges for Mental Health Social Workers. Ethics and Social Welfare 3 (3):249-263.
    Increasingly, mental health social workers in the United Kingdom and elsewhere in the world are employing coercive interventions with clients. This paper explores this trend in the context of community-based settings, using national and international research literature on this subject. It begins with a discussion about the complex, contested nature of ideas on coercion. The authors then explore debates about how coercion is perceived and applied in practice. They choose two forms of coercion?informal types of leverage, and the legally mandated (...)
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  4. Jim Campbell, David Halpin & Sean Neill (1996). Primary Schools and Opting Out: Some Policy Implications. British Journal of Educational Studies 44 (3):246 - 259.
    Significant differences in perceptions between teachers in primary and secondary grant-maintained schools are reported and analysed. Parents were more frequently involved in promoting opting-out in primary schools, primary teachers had more favourable attitudes to the grant-maintained school policy and, in primary schools, grant-maintained status delivered improvements in classroom conditions, most notably reduced class size and increased para-professional support in classrooms. The findings are discussed in terms of the management of primary schools, of theorising about reputation management in grant-maintained schools, and (...)
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