Search results for 'Jim Hurford' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. James R. Hurford (2007). The Origins of Meaning. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    In this, the first of two ground-breaking volumes on the nature of language in the light of the way it evolved, James Hurford looks at how the world first came ...
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  2. James R. Hurford (2011). The Origins of Grammar: Language in the Light of Evolution II. OUP Oxford.score: 60.0
    This is the second of the two closely linked but self-contained volumes that comprise James Hurford's acclaimed exploration of the biological evolution of language. In the first book he looked at the evolutionary origins of meaning, ending as our distant ancestors were about to step over the brink to modern language. He now considers how that step might have been taken and the consequences it undoubtedly had. -/- The capacity for language lets human beings formulate and express an unlimited (...)
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  3. James R. Hurford (2007). Semantics: A Coursebook. Cambridge University Press.score: 30.0
    This practical coursebook introduces all the basics of semantics in a simple, step-by-step fashion. Each unit includes short sections of explanation with examples, followed by stimulating practice exercises to complete in the book. Feedback and comment sections follow each exercise to enable students to monitor their progress. No previous background in semantics is assumed, as students begin by discovering the value and fascination of the subject and then move through all key topics in the field, including sense and reference, simple (...)
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  4. James R. Hurford (1998). The Evolution of Language and Languages. In [Book Chapter] (Unpublished).score: 30.0
    Human languages, such as French, Cantonese or American Sign Language, are socio- cultural entities. Knowledge of them (`competence') is acquired by exposure to the ap- propriate environment. Languages are maintained and transmitted by acts of speaking and writing; and this is also the means by which languages evolve. The utterances of one generation are processed by their children to form mental grammars, which in some sense summarize, or generalize over, the children's linguistic experiences. These grammars are the basis for the (...)
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  5. James R. Hurford (2003). Ventral/Dorsal, Predicate/Argument: The Transformation From Perception to Meaning. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (3):301-311.score: 30.0
    It is necessary to distinguish among representations caused directly by perception, representations of past perceptions in long-term memory, the representations underlying linguis- tic utterances, and the surface phonological and grammatical structures of sentences. The target article dealt essentially with predicate-argument structure at the first of these levels of representation. Discussion of the commentaries mainly involves distinguishing among various applications of the term “predicate”; clarifying the assumed relationship between classical FOPL and language; clarifying the status of unique individuals as conceived by (...)
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  6. James R. Hurford (2008). Niche-Construction, Co-Evolution, and Domain-Specificity. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (5):526-526.score: 30.0
    That language is shaped to fit the human brain is close to the Chomskyan position. The target article by Christiansen & Chater (C&C) assumes an entity, outside individual heads. What is the nature of this entity? Linguistic niche-construction and co-evolution of language and genes are possible, with some of what evolved being language-specific. Recent generative theory postulates much less than the old Universal Grammar (UG).
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  7. James R. Hurford & Simon Kirby (1998). Co-Evolution of Language-Size and the Critical Period. In [Book Chapter] (Unpublished).score: 30.0
    Species evolve, very slowly, through selection of genes which give rise to phenotypes well adapted to their environments. The cultures, including the languages, of human communities evolve, much faster, maintaining at least a minimum level of adaptedness to the external, non- cultural environment. In the phylogenetic evolution of species, the transmission of information across generations is via copying of molecules, and innovation is by mutation and sexual recombination. In cultural evolution, the transmission of information across generations is by learning, and (...)
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  8. James R. Hurford (2003). The Neural Basis of Predicate-Argument Structure. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (3):261-283.score: 30.0
    Neural correlates exist for a basic component of logical formulae, PREDICATE(x). Vision and audition research in primates and humans shows two independent neural pathways; one locates objects in body-centered space, the other attributes properties, such as colour, to objects. In vision these are the dorsal and ventral pathways. In audition, similarly separable “where” and “what” pathways exist. PREDICATE(x) is a schematic representation of the brain's integration of the two processes of delivery by the senses of the location of an arbitrary (...)
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  9. James R. Hurford (2001). Languages Treat 1-4 Specially. Mind and Language 16 (1):69–75.score: 30.0
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  10. James R. Hurford, Molly Flaherty & Giorgis Argyropoulos (2007). Past and Future, Human and Nonhuman, Semantic/Procedural and Episodic. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (3):324-325.score: 30.0
    The overlap of representations of past and future is not a completely new idea. Suddendorf & Corballis (S&C) usefully discuss the problems of testing the existence of such representations. Our taxonomy of memory differs from theirs, emphasizing the late evolutionary emergence of notions of time in memory.
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  11. Theodora Suk Fong Jim (2012). Seized by the Nymph? Kernos 25:9-26.score: 30.0
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  12. James R. Hurford (1999). Individuals Are Abstractions. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (4):620-621.score: 30.0
    Barsalou's move to a perceptual basis for cognition is welcome. His scheme contrasts with classical logical schemes in many ways, including its implications for the status of individuals. Barsalou deals mainly with perceived individuals, omitting discussion of cognized individuals. It is argued that the individuality of cognized individuals is an abstraction, which conforms in its manner of formation to other cognitive abstractions which Barsalou discusses, such as truth and disjunction.
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  13. James R. Hurford (1991). The Evolution of the Critical Period for Language Acquisition. Cognition 40 (3):159-201.score: 30.0
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  14. James R. Hurford & Jean-Louis Dessalles (2002). The Problematic Transition From Specific Competences to General Competence. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (6):690-691.score: 30.0
    Postulating a variety of mutually isolated thought domains for prelinguistic creatures is both unparsimonious and implausible, requiring unexplained parallel evolution of each separate module. Furthermore, the proposal that domain-general concepts are not accessible without prior exposure to phonetically realized human language utterances cannot be implemented by any concept-acquisition mechanism.
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  15. Theodora Suk Fong Jim (2011). The Vocabulary of Ἀπάρχεσθαι, Ἀπαρχή and Related Terms in Archaic and Classical Greece. Kernos 24:39-58.score: 30.0
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  16. C. A. Lengacher, H. Jim, R. Reich, E. Pracht, B. Craig, S. Ramesar, I. Carranza, C. Paterson, P. Budhrani & L. Millette (2012). Improving Quality of Life in Breast Cancer Survivors: The Cost-Effectiveness of Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction. Irb 1:01A2.score: 30.0
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  17. James Hurford, Sam Joseph, Simon Kirby & Alastair Reid (1997). Evolution Might Select Constructivism. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (4):567-568.score: 30.0
    There is evidence for increase, followed by decline, in synaptic numbers during development. Dendrites do not function in isolation. A constructive neuronal process may underpin a selectionist cognitive process. The environment shapes both ontogeny and phylogeny. Phylogenetic natural selection and neural selection are compatible. Natural selection can yield both constructivist and selectionist solution to adaptuive problems.
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  18. Theodora Suk Fong Jim (2013). M. Dillon, L. Garland The Ancient Greeks. History and Culture From Archaic Times to the Death of Alexander. Pp. Xxxiv + 656, Ills, Maps. London and New York: Routledge, 2013. Paper, £26.99, US$44.95 (Cased, £120, US$190). ISBN: 978-0-415-47143-5 (978-0-415-47144-2 Hbk). [REVIEW] The Classical Review 63 (2):492-493.score: 30.0
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  19. James Hurford (2012). Linguistics From an Evolutionary Point of View. In Ruth M. Kempson, Tim Fernando & Nicholas Asher (eds.), Philosophy of Linguistics. North Holland. 477.score: 30.0
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  20. James R. Hurford & Simon Kirby (1995). Neural Preconditions for Proto-Language. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (1):193.score: 30.0
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  21. Theodora Suk Fong Jim (2013). The Nature of the Religious Dispute in Thucydides 1.25.4. Classical Quarterly 63 (2):537-542.score: 30.0
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  22. Simon Kirby & James R. Hurford (2002). The Emergence of Linguistic Structure: An Overview of the Iterated Learning Model. In. In A. Cangelosi & D. Parisi (eds.), Simulating the Evolution of Language. Springer-Verlag. 121--147.score: 30.0
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  23. James R. Hurford & Simon Kirby (1998). [Book Chapter] (Unpublished).score: 30.0
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  24. James R. Hurford (1990). Beyond the Roadblock in Linguistic Evolution Studies. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):736-737.score: 30.0
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  25. James R. Hurford (1974). Exclusive or Inclusive Disjunction. Foundations of Language 11 (3):409-411.score: 30.0
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  26. J. R. Hurford (1995). Language Evolution: A Gap Still Unbridged. Semiotica 104 (3-4):365-370.score: 30.0
     
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  27. James R. Hurford (2007). Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems. Interaction Studies 8 (3):501-517.score: 30.0
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  28. Wishloff Jim (2003). Responsible Free Enterprise: What It is and Why We Don't Have It. Teaching Business Ethics 7 (3).score: 30.0
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  29. Amir Ahmadi & Alison Ross (2012). Jim Jarmusch's Dead Man. Angelaki 17 (4):179 - 192.score: 24.0
    Jim Jarmusch's Dead Man is a modern myth. Like many ancient myths it seems to have the structure of a rite of passage analysed by van Gennep into three stages: separation, marginal existence and reintegration. Separation is precipitated by a traumatic event and the marginal state is characterized by extraordinary experiences and feats. However, Jarmusch's tale does not quite fit the ancient initiation pattern since the last stage, reintegration, is at least prima facie missing. This already undermines the social function (...)
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  30. Jung H. Lee (2009). The Moral Power of Jim: A Mencian Reading of Huckleberry Finn. Asian Philosophy 19 (2):101 – 118.score: 18.0
    This paper examines the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn in the light of the early Confucian thinker Mencius, arguing in essence that Mencian theories of moral development and self-cultivation can help us to recover the moral significance of Twain's novel. Although 'ethical criticisms' of Huckleberry Finn share a long history, I argue that most interpretations have failed to appreciate the moral significance of Jim, either by focusing on the moral arc of Huck in isolation or by casting Jim in one-dimensional terms (...)
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  31. Fiona Cowie (2003). Hurford's Partial Vindication of Classical Empiricism. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (3):289-290.score: 18.0
    Hurford's discussion also vindicates the classical empiricist program in semantics. The idea that PREDICATE(x) is the logical form of the sensory representations encoded via the dorsal and ventral streams validates empiricists' insistence on the psychological primacy of sense data, which have the same form. In addition to knowing the logical form of our primitive representations, however, we need accounts of (1) their contents and (2) how more complex thoughts are derived from them. Ideally, our semantic vocabulary would both reflect (...)
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  32. Jim Campbell (2009). Letter From President Jim Campbell on the State of the Society. Newsletter of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 37 (108):4-4.score: 18.0
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  33. Branden Fitelson, Comments on Jim Franklin's “the Representation of Context: Ideas From Artificial Intelligence”.score: 18.0
    To be honest, I have almost nothing critical to say about Jim’s presentation (and this is quite unusual for a cranky analytic philosopher like me!). What Jim has said is all very sensible, and his examples are very well chosen, etc. So, instead of making critical remarks, I will try to expand a little on one of the themes Jim briefly touched upon in his talk: the contextuality of probability.
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  34. Steven L. Ross (1984). Weakness and Dignity in Conrad's Lord Jim. Philosophy Research Archives 10:153-171.score: 18.0
    Conrad’s Lord Jim presents not only a paradigmatic case of weakness of will, but an equally paradigmatic case of the enormous difficulties that attend fitting weakness of will into our other moral attitudes, particularly those relating to moral worth and moral shame. Conrad’s general conception of character and morality is deeply Aristotelian in many respects, somewhat Kantian in others. The essay traces out the intuitive strengths and philosophical difficulties that both an Aristotelian and a Kantian conception will have before the (...)
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  35. Amrit Heer (2014). Karen Houle and Jim Vernon (Eds): Hegel and Deleuze: Together Again for the First Time. Continental Philosophy Review 47 (1):123-128.score: 18.0
    With this important volume, Karen Houle and Jim Vernon have done a masterful job at assembling a collection of essays on a topic which, until recently, has gone undeservedly neglected in contemporary scholarship—the relationship between German Idealist, G. W. F. Hegel, and twentieth Century French philosopher, Gilles Deleuze. The relationship between these two thinkers has been neglected in favor of Deleuze’s relationship to other historical figures (most importantly Kant), and Hegel’s relationship to other contemporary figures (for example, Derrida). In this (...)
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  36. Timothy Endicott, Joshua Getzler & Edwin Peel (eds.) (2006). Properties of Law: Essays in Honour of Jim Harris. OUP Oxford.score: 18.0
    The late Jim Harris' theory of the science of law, and his theoretical work on human rights and property, have been a challenge and stimulus to legal scholars for the past twenty-five years. This collection of essays, originally conceived as a festschrift and now offered to the memory of a greatly admired scholar, assesses Harris' contribution across many fields of law and legal philosophy. The chapters are written by some of the foremost specialists writing today, and reflect the wide range (...)
     
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  37. Richard A. Epstein (2006). Weak and Strong Conceptions of Property : An Essay in Memory of Jim Harris. In J. W. Harris, Timothy Andrew Orville Endicott, Joshua Getzler & Edwin Peel (eds.), Properties of Law: Essays in Honour of Jim Harris. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
     
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  38. J. W. Harris, Timothy Andrew Orville Endicott, Joshua Getzler & Edwin Peel (eds.) (2006). Properties of Law: Essays in Honour of Jim Harris. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    This book comprises essays in law and legal theory celebrating the life and work of Jim Harris. The topics addressed reflect the wide range of Harris's work, and the depth of his influence on legal studies. They include the nature of law and legal reasoning, rival theories of property rights and their impact on practical questions before the courts; the nature of precedent in legal argument; and the evolving concept of human rights and its place in legal discourse.
     
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  39. Paul Redding, Replies to Bob Brandom and Jim Kreines.score: 15.0
    (Author’s reply at “Author-Meets-Critics” session (on Paul Redding, Analytic Philosophy and the Return of Hegelian Thought) at the Annual Meeting of the American Philosophical Association, Pacific Division, Vancouver, April 10, 2009. Robert Brandom’s “critic’s” contribution is available as “Hegel and Analytic Philosophy” from his website http://www.pitt.edu/~brandom/.).
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  40. Daniel Brudney (1998). Lord Jim and Moral Judgment: Literature and Moral Philosophy. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 56 (3):265-281.score: 15.0
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  41. James Franklin, Philorum A Philosophy Forum Jim Franklin - Is There Anything Wrong with Pornography? (Debate with Patricia Petersen) Delivered 02 Jun 2004 Www.Philorum.Org. [REVIEW]score: 15.0
    Argues that married sex is an extreme sexual practice that shows of pornography and other alternatives as second best.
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  42. Adam Leite, For Jim Pryor, with Gratitude, in Order to Find Out Exactly Where We Disagree.score: 15.0
    “Moorean Dogmatist” responses to external world skepticism endorse courses of reasoning that many people find objectionable. This paper seeks to locate this dissatisfaction in considerations about epistemic responsibility. I sketch a theory of immediate warrant and show how it can be combined with plausible “inferential internalist” demands arising from considerations of epistemic responsibility. The resulting view endorses immediate perceptual warrant but forbids the sort of reasoning that “Moorean Dogmatism” would allow. A surprising result is that Dogmatism’s commitment to immediate epistemic (...)
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  43. A. C. Besley (2005). Jim Marshall: Foucault and Disciplining the Self. Educational Philosophy and Theory 37 (3):309–315.score: 15.0
  44. D. W. Hamlyn (1994). An Introduction to Historical Epistemology By Mary Tiles and Jim Tiles Oxford and Cambridge, Mass.: Blackwel, 1993 Vi+223, £37.50 HB, £13.99 PB. [REVIEW] Philosophy 69 (270):511-.score: 15.0
  45. Martin Hollis (1983). Jim and the Indians. Analysis 43 (1):36 - 39.score: 15.0
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  46. Peter Smith, There Are Sea-Serpents, Jim, but Not as We Know Them.score: 15.0
    At the last meeting, Tim Crane gave a talk in which he made play with a distinction between ‘believing in’ and ‘believing that’. And he claimed that this distinction could be put to serious philosophical work of interest to serious metaphysicians. My hunch at the time was that this distinction in fact can’t bear any real weight. But I can’t now reconstruct Tim’s own arguments sufficiently to give a fair evaluation of them. However, Tim did say that the distinction he (...)
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  47. Jere O'Neill Surber (2007). Review of Jim Vernon, Hegel's Philosophy of Language. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (11).score: 15.0
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  48. Bernard S. Strauss (2004). Rosy and Jim: The Mystery of the Double Helix. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 47 (3):443-448.score: 15.0
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  49. Harvey Siegel (2001). Dangerous Dualisms or Murky Monism? A Reply to Jim Garrison. Journal of Philosophy of Education 35 (4):577–595.score: 15.0
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