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Profile: Jin Park (American University)
  1. Jin Y. Park (2013). Ethics of Tension: A Buddhist-Postmodern Ethical Paradigm. Taiwan Journal of East Asian Studies 10 (19):123-142.
    This essay considers an ethical paradigm that can be drawn from Buddhist and postmodern philosophy. Ethics is a practical branch of philosophy and an ethical paradigm is closely connected to the fundamental structure and tenets of a philosophical system. That ethics is a practical branch of philosophy also indicates that meaning and value of a certain ethical paradigm is directly related to the environments in which the paradigm is understood and practiced. In considering an ethical paradigm based on Buddhist and (...)
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  2. Jin Y. Park (2013). Hwa Yol Jung and the Question of Comparative Philosophy: A Review of Hwa Yol Jung's Transversal Rationality and Intercultural Texts. [REVIEW] Human Studies 36 (4):599-606.
    A TrajectoryIn an essay that is now a classic piece in understanding post-modern culture, Jean-François Lyotard wrote, “[e]clecticism is the degree zero of contemporary general culture: one listens to reggae, watches a western, eats McDonald’s food for lunch and local cuisine for dinner, wears Paris perfume in Tokyo and ‘retro’ clothes in Hong Kong” (Lyotard 1989: 76). The boundaries have become blurred in both positive and negative senses. Geographical borders have loosened through ever-increasing mobility as cultural exchanges become more accessible (...)
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  3. Jin Y. Park (2013). In Memoriam: Kwang‐Sae Lee. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 40 (1):218-219.
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  4. Jin Y. Park (2011). One Korean's Approach to Buddhism: The Mom/Momjit Paradigm (Review). Philosophy East and West 61 (3):576-578.
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  5. Jin Y. Park (2009). The Double : Merleau-Ponty and Chinul on Thinking and Questioning. In Jin Y. Park & Gereon Kopf (eds.), Merleau-Ponty and Buddhism. Lexington Books.
  6. Jin Y. Park & Gereon Kopf (2009). Introduction: Philosophy, Non-Philosophy, and Comparative Philosophy. In Jin Y. Park & Gereon Kopf (eds.), Merleau-Ponty and Buddhism. Lexington Books.
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  7. Jin Y. Park & Gereon Kopf (eds.) (2009). Merleau-Ponty and Buddhism. Lexington Books.
    The thirteen essays in this volume explore this third space in their discussions of Merleau-Ponty's concepts of the intentional arc, the flesh of the world, and ...
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  8. Jin Y. Park (2005). Zen Language in Our Time: The Case of Pojo Chinul's. Philosophy East and West 55 (1).
    : Zen philosophy of language is discussed by exploring the concepts of live anddeadwords,involvement with meaningand involvement with words, and the three mysterious gates as they are employed in Pojo Chinul's huatou meditation. A comparison is made betweenthe Zenuse of language and Merleau-Ponty's philosophy of visibility, Julia Kristeva's idea of the semiotic and the symbolic, and Kierkegaard's concept of anxiety, in an attempt to provide a paradigm to understand the Zen Buddhist vision.
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  9. Jin Y. Park (2005). Zen Language in Our Time: The Case of Pojo Chinul's Huatou Meditation. Philosophy East and West 55 (1):80-98.
    Zen philosophy of language is discussed by exploring the concepts of live and dead words, involvement with meaning and involvement with words, and the three mysterious gates as they are employed in Pojo Chinul's huatou meditation. A comparison is made between the Zen use of language and Merleau-Ponty's philosophy of visibility, Julia Kristeva's idea of the semiotic and the symbolic, and Kierkegaard's concept of anxiety, in an attempt to provide a paradigm to understand the Zen Buddhist vision.
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  10. Jin Y. Park (2003). Living the Inconceivable: Hua-Yen Buddhism and Postmodern Différend. Asian Philosophy 13 (2 & 3):165 – 174.
    This essay attempts a paradigmatic comparison between the fourfold worldview of Hua-yen Buddhism and the postmodern philosophy of Jean-François Lyotard. Employing a tension between centripetal and centrifugal forces as a structural underpinning of these two philosophies, the essay illuminates the liberating nature of Hua-yen Buddhism and postmodern thought together with the shadow of skepticism involved in endorsing a vision for a poly-lingual existence. Despite human beings' desire for a totalitarian vision hidden in every aspect of our (...)
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  11. Jin Y. Park (2003). Understanding Philosophical Thinking: Buddhism and Postmodern Thought. In Keli Fang (ed.), Chinese Philosophy and the Trends of the 21st Century Civilization. Commercial Press. 4--418.
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  12. Jin Y. Park (2002). Zen and Zen Philosophy of Language: A Soteriological Approach. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 1 (2):209-228.
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