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Joan Y. Chiao [9]Joan Chiao [1]
  1. Tokiko Harada, Donna J. Bridge & Joan Y. Chiao (2012). Dynamic Social Power Modulates Neural Basis of Math Calculation. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.
    Both situational (e.g., perceived power) and sustained social factors (e.g., cultural stereotypes) are known to affect how people academically perform, particularly in the domain of mathematics. The ability to compute even simple mathematics, such as addition, relies on distinct neural circuitry within the inferior parietal and inferior frontal lobes, brain regions where magnitude representation and addition are performed. Despite prior behavioral evidence of social influence on academic performance, little is known about whether or not temporarily heightening a person’s sense of (...)
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  2. Lisa A. Hechtman, Narun Pornpattananangkul & Joan Y. Chiao (2012). Psychological Constructionism and Cultural Neuroscience. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (3):152 - 153.
    Lindquist et al. argue that emotional categories do not map onto distinct regions within the brain, but rather, arise from basic psychological processes, including conceptualization, executive attention, and core affect. Here, we use examples from cultural neuroscience to argue that psychological constructionism, not locationism, captures the essential role of emotion in the social and cultural brain.
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  3. Joan Y. Chiao (2011). Towards a Cultural Neuroscience of Empathy and Prosociality. Emotion Review 3 (1):111-112.
    Recent evidence from the social neuroscience of empathy suggests that there is core neural circuitry underlying empathy in humans, and important roles for top—down and bottom—up processes in the production and regulation of empathic experience. Less well understood is how cultural and genetic forces give rise to empathy and prosocial behavior within and across groups. Here I argue that culture-gene coevolutionary theory may play an important role in understanding how and when empathy is experienced, and that future research in cultural (...)
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  4. Joan Y. Chiao, Katherine D. Blizinsky, Vani A. Mathur & Bobby K. Cheon (2011). Culture–Gene Coevolution of Empathy and Altruism. In Barbara Oakley, Ariel Knafo, Guruprasad Madhavan & David Sloan Wilson (eds.), Pathological Altruism. Oxford University Press.
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  5. Heather D. Lucas, Joan Y. Chiao & Ken A. Paller (2011). Frontiers: Why Some Faces Won't Be Remembered: Brain Potentials Illuminate Successful Versus Unsuccessful Encoding for Same-Race and Other-Race Faces. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.
     
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  6. Joan Y. Chiao & Bobby K. Cheon (2010). The Weirdest Brains in the World. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (2-3):88-90.
    Henrich et al. provide a compelling argument about a bias in the behavioral sciences to study human behavior primarily in WEIRD populations. Here we argue that brain scientists are susceptible to similar biases, sampling primarily from WEIRD populations; and we discuss recent evidence from cultural neuroscience demonstrating the importance and viability of investigating culture across multiple levels of analysis.
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  7. Mary Helen Immordino-Yang, Joan Y. Chiao & Alan P. Fiske (2010). Neural Reuse in the Social and Emotional Brain. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (4):275-276.
    Presenting evidence from the social brain, we argue that neural reuse is a dynamic, socially organized process that is influenced ontogenetically and evolutionarily by the cultural transmission of mental techniques, values, and modes of thought. Anderson's theory should be broadened to accommodate cultural effects on the functioning of architecturally similar neural systems, and the implications of these differences for reuse.
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  8. Tyler K. Perrachione, Joan Y. Chiao & Patrick C. M. Wong (2010). Asymmetric Cultural Effects on Perceptual Expertise Underlie an Own-Race Bias for Voices. Cognition 114 (1):42-55.
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  9. Joan Chiao & T. Harada (2008). Cultural Neuroscience of Consciousness: From Visual Perception to Self-Awareness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (s 10-11):58-69.
    Philosophical inquiries into the nature of consciousness have long been intrinsically tied to questions regarding the nature of the self. Although philosophers of mind seldom make reference to the role of cultural context in shaping consciousness, since antiquity culture has played a notable role in philosophical conceptions of the self. Western philosophers, from Plato to Locke, have emphasized an individualistic view of the self that is autonomous and consistent across situations, while Eastern philosophers, such as Lao Tzu and Confucius, have (...)
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  10. Joan Y. Chiao, Andrew R. Bordeaux & Nalini Ambady (2004). Mental Representations of Social Status. Cognition 93 (2):B49-B57.
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