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Joan E. Sieber [20]Joan E. E. Sieber [1]
  1. Virginia A. de Wolf, Joan E. Sieber, Philip M. Steel & Alvan O. Zarate (forthcoming). Part I: What is the Requirement for Data Sharing? Irb.
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  2. Joan E. Sieber (forthcoming). On Studying the Powerful (or Fearing to Do So): A Vital Role for IRBs. Irb.
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  3. Joan E. Sieber (forthcoming). Planning Ethically Responsible Research: A Guide for Students and Internal Review Boards. Ethics.
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  4. Joan E. Sieber (forthcoming). Sharing Scientific Data I: New Problems for IRBs. Irb.
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  5. Joan E. Sieber & James L. Sorensen (forthcoming). Conducting Social and Behavioral AIDS Research in Drug Treatment Clinics. Irb.
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  6. Joan E. Sieber (2008). Empirical Research on Ethical Issues in Pediatric Research. Ethics and Behavior 18 (2 & 3):127 – 138.
    Although there is usually agreement about the ethical principles that should govern research on children, there may be little agreement on how those principles should be interpreted into research procedures in some instances. Empirical research on ethical issues that arise in research on children can often elucidate ways to improve on existing research practices and ways to resolve debates about best practices. Following in the success of evidence-based medicine, evidence-based ethical problem solving in human research can enable investigators to avoid (...)
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  7. Stephanie J. Bird & Joan E. Sieber (2005). Teaching Ethics in Science and Engineering: Effective Online Education. Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (3):323-328.
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  8. Joan E. Sieber (2005). Gentle Alternatives to Whistle-Blowing Rev 10-. Journal of Academic Ethics 3 (1):87-88.
  9. Joan E. Sieber (2005). Misconceptions and Realities About Teaching Online. Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (3):329-340.
    This article is intended to guide online course developers and teachers. A brief review of the literature on the misconceptions of beginning online teachers reveals that most accept the notion that putting one’s lecture notes online produces effective learning, or that technology will make education more convenient and cost-effective for all concerned. Effective online learning requires a high level of responsibility for learning on the part of students and a reduction of the teacher-student power differential. This, in turn, has major (...)
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  10. Joan E. Sieber (2005). Research Into Gentle Alternatives to Whistleblowing: A Call for Participants in a Research Project. Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (4):678-679.
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  11. Joan E. E. Sieber (2005). Evidence-Based Ethical Problem Solving: An Idea Whose Time has Come. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 3 (2-4):113-125.
    This is an account of the evolution of ideas and the confluence of support and vision that has eventuated in the founding of the Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics (JERHRE). Many factors have contributed to the creation of this rather atypical academic journal, including a scientific and administrative culture that finally saw the need for it, modern electronic technology, individuals across the world who were committed to somehow finding common ground between researchers and those charged with ethical (...)
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  12. Joan E. Sieber (2004). Empirical Research on Research Ethics. Ethics and Behavior 14 (4):397 – 412.
    Ethics is normative; ethics indicates, in broad terms, what researchers should do. For example, researchers should respect human participants. Empirical study tells us what actually happens. Empirical research is often needed to fine-tune the best ways to achieve normative objectives, for example, to discover how best to achieve the dual aims of gaining important knowledge and respecting participants. Ethical decision making by scientists and institutional review boards should not be based on hunches and anecdotes (e.g., about such matters as what (...)
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  13. Joan E. Sieber (2004). Introduction to the Special Issue: Using Our Best Judgment in Conducting Human Research. Ethics and Behavior 14 (4):297 – 304.
    The federal regulations of human research were written to permit the use of discretion so that research can fit the circumstances under which it is conducted. For example, the researcher and institutional review board (IRB) could waive or alter some informed consent elements if they deem this the morally and scientifically best way to conduct the research. To do so, however, researchers and IRBs would first have to use mature moral and scientific judgment. They might also have to rely on (...)
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  14. Joan E. Sieber (2004). Using Our Best Judgment in Conducting Human Research. Ethics and Behavior 14 (4):297-304.
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  15. Joan E. Sieber (1999). Why Fallout From Whistleblowing is Hard to Avoid. Science and Engineering Ethics 5 (2):255-260.
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  16. Joan E. Sieber (1998). The Psychology of Whistleblowing. Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (1):7-23.
    Whistleblowing, its antecedents, and its aftermath are complex and varied phenomena. Motivational factors in the perception of alleged misconduct and in the response to such allegations by the accused and the institution are examined. Understanding the psychological processes that underlie some of the surprising behavior surrounding whistleblowing will enable those who perceive wrongdoing, as well as the professional societies and work organizations which voice their concern, to better respond to apparent wrongdoing, while preserving the reputation and mental health of all (...)
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  17. Joan E. Sieber, Rebecca Iannuzzo & Beverly Rodriguez (1995). Deception Methods in Psychology: Have They Changed in 23 Years? Ethics and Behavior 5 (1):67 – 85.
    To learn whether criticism and regulation of research practices have been followed by a reduction of deception or use of more acceptable approaches to deception, the contents of all 1969, 1978, 1986, and 1992 issues of the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology were examined. Deception research was coded according to type of (non)informing (e.g., false informing, consent to deception, no informing), possible harmfulness of deception employed (e.g., powerfulness of induction, morality of the behavior induced, privacy of behavior), method of (...)
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  18. Joan E. Sieber & Bruce E. Trumbo (1995). (Not) Giving Credit Where Credit is Due: Citation of Data Sets. Science and Engineering Ethics 1 (1):11-20.
    Adequate Citation of data sets is crucial to the encouragement of data sharing, to the integrity and cost-effectiveness of science and to easy access to the work of others. The citation behavior of social scientists who have published based on shared data was examined and found to be inconsistent with important ideals of science. Insights gained from the social sciences, where data sharing is somewhat customary, suggest policies and incentives that would foster adequate citation by secondary users, and greater openness (...)
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  19. Joan E. Sieber (1994). Issues Presented by Mandatory Reporting Requirements to Researchers of Child Abuse and Neglect. Ethics and Behavior 4 (1):1 – 22.
    Mandatory reporting laws, which vary slightly from state to state, require reporting by helping professionals when there is reasonable cause to suspect child abuse. Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) require researchers to warn subjects of this duty to report, which may have a chilling effect on subject rapport and candor. Certificates of confidentiality, in conjunction with other precautions, may reduce some barriers to valid research. Attempts to resolve problems created by reporting laws must produce the most valid research, while minimizing harm (...)
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  20. Joan E. Sieber (1991). Openness in the Social Sciences: Sharing Data. Ethics and Behavior 1 (2):69 – 86.
    The sharing of research data is now mandated by some funders to encourage openness and integrity in science, to ensure efficient use of research funds, and to provide training resources. Although data sharing has a long history in some parts of science, the full range of possibilities and challenges it offers are only now becoming apparent in the social sciences. This article (a) examines what may be entailed in sharing documented data, (b) provides a historical perspective on data sharing, (c) (...)
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  21. Joan E. Sieber & Reuel M. Baluyot (1991). A Survey of IRB Concerns About Social and Behavioral Research. Irb 14 (2):9-10.
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