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  1. Joan Gibson (2006). The Logic of Chastity: Women, Sex, and the History of Philosophy in the Early Modern Period. Hypatia 21 (4):1-19.
    : Before women could become visible as philosophers, they had first to become visible as rational autonomous thinkers. A social and ethical position holding that chastity was the most important virtue for women, and that rationality and chastity were incompatible, was a significant impediment to accepting women's capacity for philosophical thought. Thus one of the first tasks for women was to confront this belief and argue for their rationality in the face of a self-referential dilemma.
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  2. Joan McIver Gibson (1996). Death by Definition and Process. HEC Forum 8 (6):340-345.
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  3. Joan McIver Gibson (1995). Response of the St. Joseph Healthcare System Ethics Committee (Albuquerque, NM). HEC Forum 7 (1):46-47.
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  4. Joan McIver Gibson (1992). New Mexico. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 1 (02):122-.
  5. Mary Beth West & Joan McIver Gibson (1992). Facilitating Medical Ethics Case Review: What Ethics Committees Can Learn From Mediation and Facilitation Techniques. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 1 (01):63-.
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  6. Joan McIver Gibson (1990). The Medical Treatment Guardian Program. HEC Forum 2 (1):19-39.
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  7. Pam Lambert, Joan McIver Gibson & Paul Nathanson (1990). The Values History: An Innovation in Surrogate Medical Decision-Making. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 18 (3):202-212.
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  8. Joan Gibson (1989). Educating for Silence: Renaissance Women and the Language Arts. Hypatia 4 (1):9 - 27.
    In the Renaissance, educating for philosophy was integrated with educating for an active role in society, and both were conditioned by the prevailing educational theories based on humanist revisions of the trivium. I argue that women's education in the Renaissance remained tied to grammar while the education of men was directed toward action through eloquence. This is both a result of and a condition for the greater restriction on the social opportunities for women.
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  9. Joan Mclver Gibson & Thomasine Kimbrough Kushner (1986). Will the “Conscience of an Institution” Become Society's Servant? Hastings Center Report 16 (3):9-11.
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