20 found
Sort by:
  1. Joel B. Hagen (2013). Roots of Ecology: Antiquity to Haeckel. Bioscience 63 (4):305-306.
  2. Joel B. Hagen (2013). The Multiple Origins of Ecology. Bioscience 63 (4).
  3. Joel B. Hagen (2012). Five Kingdoms, More or Less: Robert Whittaker and the Broad Classification of Organisms. Bioscience 62 (1):67-74.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Joel B. Hagen, David A. Mortensen, J. Franklin Egan, Bruce D. Maxwell, Matthew R. Ryan, Richard G. Smith, Will R. Turner, Katrina Brandon, Thomas M. Brooks & Claude Gascon (2012). 11. Biology in History. Bioscience 62 (1).
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Joel B. Hagen (2010). A Guinea Pig's History of Biology. Bioscience 60 (5):389-390.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Joel B. Hagen (2010). A History of Model Organisms. Bioscience 60 (5):389-390.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Joel B. Hagen (2010). Waiting for Sequences: Morris Goodman, Immunodiffusion Experiments, and the Origins of Molecular Anthropology. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 43 (4):697 - 725.
    During the early 1960s, Morris Goodman used a variety of immunological tests to demonstrate the very close genetic relationships among humans, chimpanzees, and gorillas. Molecular anthropologists often point to this early research as a critical step in establishing their new specialty. Based on his molecular results, Goodman challenged the widely accepted taxonomie classification that separated humans from chimpanzees and gorillas in two separate families. His claim that chimpanzees and gorillas should join humans in family Hominidae sparked a well-known conflict with (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Joel B. Hagen (2005). Book Review: David M. Williams and Peter L. Forey, Eds., Milestones in Systematics, The Systematics Association Special Volume Series 67 (Boca Raton, Fla: CRC Press, 2004), Xvii + 290 Pp. Illus., $99.95. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 38 (1):165-167.
  9. Joel B. Hagen (2001). 1The Introduction of Computers Into Systematic Research in the United States During the 1960s. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 32 (2):291-314.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Joel B. Hagen (1999). Naturalists, Molecular Biologists, and the Challenges of Molecular Evolution. Journal of the History of Biology 32 (2):321 - 341.
    Biologists and historians often present natural history and molecular biology as distinct, perhaps conflicting, fields in biological research. Such accounts, although supported by abundant evidence, overlook important areas of overlap between these areas. Focusing upon examples drawn particularly from systematics and molecular evolution, I argue that naturalists and molecular biologists often share questions, methods, and forms of explanation. Acknowledging these interdisciplinary efforts provides a more balanced account of the development of biology during the post-World War II era.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Joel B. Hagen (1999). Retelling Experiments: H.B.D. Kettlewell's Studies of Industrial Melanism in Peppered Moths. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 14 (1):39-54.
    H. B. D. Kettlewell's field experiments on industrial melanism in the peppered moth, Biston betularia, have become the best known demonstration of natural selection in <span class='Hi'>action</span>. I argue that textbook accounts routinely portray this research as an example of controlled experimentation, even though this is historically misleading. I examine how idealized accounts of Kettlewell's research have been used by professional biologists and biology teachers. I also respond to some criticisms of David Rudge to my earlier discussions of this case (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Mark V. Barrow Jr, Keith R. Benson, Paula Findlen, Deborah Fitzgerald, Joel B. Hagen, Joy Harvey, Sharon E. Kingsland, Jane Maienschein, Gregg Mitman & Lynn K. Nyhart (1996). The JHB Bookshelf. Journal of the History of Biology 29:463-479.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Sara F. Tjossem, Vassiliki Betty Smocovitis, Paul Lawrence Farber, Joel B. Hagen, David Magnus & Jean-Paul Gaudilli´re (1996). The J. H. B. Bookshelf. Journal of the History of Biology 29 (1):145-154.
  14. Marjorie Grene, Sherrie L. Lyons, Mark V. Barrow Jr, Ronald Rainger, Susan Lindee, Jane Maienschein, Michael Fortun & Joel B. Hagen (1994). The J.H.B. Bookshelf. Journal of the History of Biology 27 (1):161-175.
  15. William C. Summers, Joel B. Hagen, Mark V. Barrow Jr, Lynn Nyhart & M. Susan Lindee (1992). The J.H.B. Bookshelf. Journal of the History of Biology 25 (2):335-342.
  16. Mark V. Barrow Jr, Keith R. Benson, Paula Findlen, Michael Fortun, Shirley A. Roe & Joel B. Hagen (1991). The J.H.B. Bookshelf. Journal of the History of Biology 24 (2):339-351.
  17. Joel B. Hagen (1990). Problems in the Institutionalization of Tropical Biology: The Case of the Barro Colorado Island Biological Laboratory. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 12 (2):225 - 247.
    This article examines the changing status of tropical biology by considering the origins and early development of the Barro Colorado Island Biological Laboratory. Today the laboratory is part of a large diversified tropical research center operated by the Smithsonian Institution. However, for most of its history the laboratory led a tenuous existence. Both the early problems and eventual success of the institution can only be explained by considering the interaction of various intellectual, institutional, and broader social factors.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Joel B. Hagen (1989). Research Perspectives and the Anomalous Status of Modern Ecology. Biology and Philosophy 4 (4):433-455.
    Ecology has often been characterized as an immature scientific discipline. This paper explores some of the sources of this alleged immaturity. I argue that the perception of immaturity results primarily from the fact that historically ecologists have based their work upon two very different approaches to research.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Joel B. Hagen (1986). Ecologists and Taxonomists: Divergent Traditions in Twentieth-Century Plant Geography. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 19 (2):197 - 214.
    The distinction between taxonomic plant geography and ecological plant geography was never absolute: it would be historically inaccurate to portray them as totally divergent. Taxonomists occasionally borrowed ecological concepts, and ecologists never completely repudiated taxonomy. Indeed, some botanists pursued the two types of geographic study. The American taxonomist Henry Allan Gleason (1882–1975), for one, made noteworthy contributions to both. Most of Gleason's research appeared in short articles, however. He never published a major synthetic work comparable in scope or influence to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Joel B. Hagen (1984). Experimentalists and Naturalists in Twentieth-Century Botany: Experimental Taxonomy, 1920-1950. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 17 (2):249 - 270.
    Experimental taxonomy was a diverse area of research, and botanists who helped develop it were motivated by a variety of concerns. While experimental taxonomy was never totally a taxonomic enterprise, improvement in classification was certainly one major motivation behind the research. Hall's and Clements' belief that experimental methods added more objectivity to classification was almost universally accepted by experimental taxonomists. Such methods did add a new dimension to taxonomy — a dimension that field and herbarium studies, however rigorous, could not (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation