1. Joel Richeimer (2008). Lloyd, G. E. R., Cognitive Variations: Reflections on the Unity and Diversity of the Human Mind. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (3):339-342.
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  2. Joel Richeimer (2000). How Philosophy Lost Perceptual Expertise. Synthese 124 (3):385 - 406.
    If we think of perceptual expertise, we might think ofa neurologist interpreting a CAT scan or an astronomerlooking at a star. But perceptual expertise is notlimited to experts. Perceptual expertise is atthe heart of our everyday competence in the world. Wenavigate around obstacles, we take turns inconversations, we make left-turns in face of on-comingtraffic. Each of us is a perceptual expert (thoughonly in certain domains). If we misunderstandperceptual expertise, we risk misunderstanding ourepistemic relationship to the world. I argue that thestandard (...)
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  3. Alan R. Madry & Joel F. Richeimer (1998). The Possibility of Normative Jurisprudence: A Response to Brian Leiter. Legal Theory 4 (2):207-239.
    In a recent article Brian Leiter concluded that a useful normative theory of adjudication is impossible. A normative theory of adjudication would be a theory that, among other things, identified the moral and political norms that judges ought to follow in determining the law for any particular legal dispute. Letter's elegant and subtle argument, stripped to its bones, runs as follows: Philosophers of law regard a correct normative theory of adjudication as being dependent upon an antecedent descriptive theory. The dependence (...)
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