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Profile: Joel Walmsley (University College Cork)
  1. Joel Walmsley (forthcoming). Mind and Machine. Palgrave-Macmillan.
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  2. Joel Walmsley (2011). Cognitive Science. An Introduction to the Science of Mind, de José Luis Bermúdez. Teorema: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 30 (3):186-191.
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  3. Joel Walmsley (2010). Emergence and Reduction in Dynamical Cognitive Science. New Ideas in Psychology 28:274-282.
    This paper examines the widespread intuition that the dynamical approach to cognitive science is importantly related to emergentism about the mind. The explanatory practices adopted by dynamical cognitive science rule out some conceptions of emergence; covering law explanations require a deducibility relationship between explanans and explanandum, whereas canonical theories of emergence require the absence of such deducibility. A response to this problem – one which would save the intuition that dynamics and emergence are related – is to reconstrue the concept (...)
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  4. Joel Walmsley (2008). Explanation in Dynamical Cognitive Science. Minds and Machines 18 (3):331-348.
    In this paper, I outline two strands of evidence for the conclusion that the dynamical approach to cognitive science both seeks and provides covering law explanations. Two of the most successful dynamical models—Kelso’s model of rhythmic finger movement and Thelen et al.’s model of infant perseverative reaching—can be seen to provide explanations which conform to the famous explanatory scheme first put forward by Hempel and Oppenheim. In addition, many prominent advocates of the dynamical approach also express the provision of this (...)
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  5. Joel Walmsley (2008). Methodological Situatedness; or, DEEDS Worth Doing and Pursuing. Cognitive Systems Research 9:150-159.
    This paper draws a distinction between two possible understandings of the DEEDS (Dynamical, Embodied, Extended, Distributed and Situated) approach to cognition. On the one hand, the DEEDS approach may be interpreted as making a metaphysical claim about the nature and location of cognitive processes. On the other hand, the DEEDS approach may be read as providing a methodological prescription about how we ought to conduct cognitive scientific research. I argue that the latter, methodological, reading shows that the DEEDS approach is (...)
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  6. André Kukla & Joel Walmsley (2006). Mind: A Historical and Philosophical Introduction to the Major Theories. Indianapolis: Hackett Pub.
     
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  7. André Kukla & Joel Walmsley (2004). Mysticism and Social Epistemology. Episteme 1 (2):139-158.
    This article deals with the grounds for accepting or rejecting the insights of mystics. We examine the social-epistemological question of what the non-mystic should make of the mystic's claim, and what she might be able to make of it, given various possible states of the evidence available to her.For clarity, let's reserve the term “mystic” for one who claims to have had an ineffable insight. As such, there are two parts to the mystic's claim: first, a substantive insight into the (...)
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  8. Joel Walmsley & André Kukla (2004). Mysticism and Social Epistemology. Episteme 1 (2):139-158.
    This article deals with the grounds for accepting or rejecting the insights of mystics. We examine the social-epistemological question of what the non-mystic should make of the mystic's claim, and what she might be able to make of it, given various possible states of the evidence available to her.For clarity, let's reserve the term “mystic” for one who claims to have had an ineffable insight. As such, there are two parts to the mystic's claim: first, a substantive insight into the (...)
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  9. Joel Walmsley (2003). Theres Room in the Lab for an Armchair Report on the Philosophy and Neuroscience Conference Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada, 17-20, October 2002. [REVIEW] Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (3):89-93.
    Max Tegmark, a physicist at the University of Pennsylania recently remarked, 'To tell you the truth, I think most of my colleagues are terrified of talking to philosophers -- like being caught coming out of a pornographic cinema.' Fortunately, it would seem that at least some neuroscientists do not suffer from such reticence when it comes to their professional relationship with philosophy. Testament to this was the quality and variety of the papers in both philosophically- ambitious-neuroscience and neuroscience-inspired-philosophy at what (...)
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