20 found
Sort by:
  1. Johanna Oksala (forthcoming). Foucault, Politics, and Violence in Advance. Philosophy Today.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Johanna Oksala (2014). In Defense of Experience. Hypatia 29 (2):388-403.
    This article studies our philosophical understanding of experience in order to question the current political and theoretical dismissal of experiential accounts in feminist theory. The focus is on Joan Scott's critique of experience, but the philosophical issues animating the discussion go beyond Scott's work and concern the future of feminist theory and politics more generally. I ask what it means for feminist theory to redefine experience as a linguistic event the way Scott suggests. I attempt to demonstrate that the consequences (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Johanna Oksala (2013). Feminism and Neoliberal Governmentality. Foucault Studies 16:32-53.
    The article investigates the consequences for feminist politics of the neoliberal turn. Feminist scholars have analysed the political changes in the situation of women that have been brought about by neoliberalism, but their assessments of neoliberalism’s consequences for feminist theory and politics vary. Feminist thinkers such as Hester Eisenstein and Sylvia Walby have argued that feminism must now return its focus to socialist politics and foreground economic questions of redistribution in order to combat the hegemony of neoliberalism. Some have further (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Johanna Oksala (2012). Foucault, Politics, and Violence. Northwestern University Press.
    The politicization of ontology -- Foundational violence -- Dangerous animals -- The politics of gendered violence -- Political life -- The management of state violence -- The political ontology of neoliberalism -- Violence and neoliberal governmentality -- Terror and political spirituality.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Johanna Oksala (2011). Lines of Fragility: A Foucaultian Critique of Violence. In Nathan Eckstrand & Christopher S. Yates (eds.), Philosophy and the Return of Violence: Studies From This Widening Gyre. Continuum International Publishing Group.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Johanna Oksala (2011). Sexual Experience: Foucault, Phenomenology, and Feminist Theory. Hypatia 26 (1):207-223.
    This paper explicates Foucault's conception of experience and defends it as an important theoretical resource for feminist theory. It analyzes Linda Alcoff's devastating critique of Foucault's account of sexuality and her reasons for advocating phenomenology as a more viable alternative. I agree with her that a philosophically sophisticated understanding of experience must remain central for feminist theory, but I demonstrate that her critique of Foucault is based on a mistaken view of his philosophical position as well as on a problematic (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Johanna Oksala (2011). The Neo-Liberal Subject of Feminism: From Discipline to Self-Advancement. Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 42 (1):104.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Johanna Oksala (2011). Violence and Neoliberal Governmentality. Constellations 18 (3):474-486.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Johanna Oksala (2010). Foucault's Politicization of Ontology. Continental Philosophy Review 43 (4):445-466.
    The paper explicates a politicized conception of reality with the help of Michel Foucault’s critical project. I contend that Foucault’s genealogies of power problematize the relationship between ontology and politics. His idea of productive power incorporates a radical, ontological claim about the nature of reality: Reality as we know it is the result of social practices and struggles over truth and objectivity. Rather than translating the true ontology into the right politics, he reverses the argument. The radicality of his method (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Johanna Oksala (2010). Violence and the Biopolitics of Modernity. Foucault Studies 10:23-43.
    The paper studies the relationship between political violence and biological life in the thought of Hannah Arendt, Giorgio Agamben and Michel Foucault. I follow Foucault in arguing that understanding political violence in modernity means rethinking the ontological boundary between biological and political life that has fundamentally ordered the Western tradition of political thought. I show that while Arendt, Agamben and Foucault all see the merging of the categories of life and politics as the key problem of Modernity, they understand this (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Johanna Oksala (2009). Review of Marc Djaballah, Kant, Foucault, and Forms of Experience. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (1).
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Johanna Oksala (2008). How to Read Foucault. W. W. Norton & Co..
    Introduction -- The freedom of philosophy -- Reason and madness -- The death of man -- The anonymity of literature -- From archaeology to genealogy -- The prison -- Repressed sexuality -- A true sex -- Political power, rationality, and critique -- Practices of the self.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Johanna Oksala (2008). The Management of State Violence. Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 28 (2):53-66.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Johanna Oksala (2007). The Management of State Violence: Foucault's Rethinking of Political Power as Governmentality. Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 28 (2):53-66.
  15. Jodi Dean, Cathrine Egeland, Elizabeth Grosz, Sara Heinämaa, Lisa Käll, Johanna Oksala, Kelly Oliver, Tiina Rosenberg, Kristin Sampson & Vigdis Songe-Møller (2006). Sex, Breath, and Force: Sexual Difference in a Post-Feminist Era. Lexington Books.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Johanna Oksala (2006). A Phenomenology of Gender. Continental Philosophy Review 39 (3):229-244.
    The article asks how phenomenology, understood as a philosophical method of investigation, can account for gender. Despite the fact that it has provided useful tools for feminist inquiry, the question remains how gender can be studied within the paradigm of a philosophy of a subject. The article explicates four different understandings of phenomenology and assesses their respective potential in terms of theorizing gender: a classical reading, a corporeal reading, an intersubjective reading and a post-phenomenological reading. It concludes by arguing that (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Johanna Oksala (2006). From the Death of the Author to the Freedom of Language: Foucault on Literature. Acta Philosophica Fennica 79:191.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Johanna Oksala (2005). Foucault on Freedom. Cambridge University Press.
    Freedom and the subject were guiding themes for Michel Foucault throughout his philosophical career. Johanna Oksala identifies the different interpretations of freedom in his philosophy and examines three major divisions of it: the archaeological, the genealogical, and the ethical. She demonstrates that in order to fully appreciate Foucault's "project", we must understand his complex relationship to phenomenology, and discusses Foucault's treatment of the body in relation to recent feminist work on this topic.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Johanna Oksala (2004). Anarchic Bodies: Foucault and the Feminist Question of Experience. Hypatia 19 (4):97-119.
    : The article shows that Michel Foucault's account of the sexual body is not a naïve return to a prediscursive body, nor does it amount to discourse reductionism and to the exclusion of experience, as some feminists have argued. Instead, Foucault's idea of bodies and pleasures as a possibility of the counterattack against normalizing power presupposes an experiential understanding of the body. The experiential body can become a locus of resistance because it is the possibility of an unpredictable event.
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Johanna Oksala (2004). What is Feminist Phenomenology? Thinking Birth Philosophically. Radical Philosophy 126:16-22.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation