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  1. Johanna Shapiro (2008). Walking a Mile in Their Patients' Shoes: Empathy and Othering in Medical Students' Education. [REVIEW] Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 3 (1):10.
    One of the major tasks of medical educators is to help maintain and increase trainee empathy for patients. Yet research suggests that during the course of medical training, empathy in medical students and residents decreases. Various exercises and more comprehensive paradigms have been introduced to promote empathy and other humanistic values, but with inadequate success. This paper argues that the potential for medical education to promote empathy is not easy for two reasons: a) Medical students and residents have complex and (...)
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  2. Johanna Shapiro (2008). Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 3:10.
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  3. Amy Haddad, Donna Pucciani, Johanna Shapiro & Audrey Shafer (2007). Always a Surprise, Even a Wonder: Poetry and Commentary. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 28 (2):105-114.
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  4. Pamela Schaff & Johanna Shapiro (2006). The Limits of Narrative and Culture: Reflections on Lorrie Moore's “People Like That Are the Only People Here: Canonical Babbling in Peed Onk”. Journal of Medical Humanities 27 (1):1-17.
    This article provides a discussion of the limits of both narrative and culture based on a close textual analysis of the short story, “People Like That Are the Only People Here: Canonical Babbling in Peed Onk,” by Lorrie Moore. In this story, a mother describes her experiences on a pediatric oncology ward when her infant son develops Wilms' tumor. The authors examine how the story satirically portrays the spurious claims of language, story, and culture to protect us from an unjust (...)
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  5. Johanna Shapiro, Deborah Kasman & Audrey Shafer (2006). Words and Wards: A Model of Reflective Writing and Its Uses in Medical Education. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 27 (4):231-244.
    Personal, creative writing as a process for reflection on patient care and socialization into medicine (“reflective writing”) has important potential uses in educating medical students and residents. Based on the authors’ experiences with a range of writing activities in academic medical settings, this article sets forth a conceptual model for considering the processes and effects of such writing. The first phase (writing) is individual and solitary, consisting of personal reflection and creation. Here, introspection and imagination guide learners from loss of (...)
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