34 found
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  1.  67
    Ran R. Hassin, James S. Uleman & John A. Bargh (eds.) (2005). The New Unconscious. Oxford University Press.
    Over the past two decades, a new picture of the unconscious has emerged from a variety of disciplines that are broadly part of cognitive science. According to this picture, unconscious processes seem to be capable of doing many things that were thought to require intention, deliberation, and conscious awareness. Moreover, they accomplish these things without the conflict and drama of the psychoanalytic unconscious. These processes range from complex information processing, through goal pursuit and emotions, to cognitive control and self-regulation. This (...)
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  2. John A. Bargh (1994). The Four Horsemen of Automaticity: Awareness, Intention, Efficiency, and Control in Social Cognition. In R. Wyer & T. Srull (eds.), Handbook of Social Cognition. Lawrence Erlbaum
  3.  13
    John A. Bargh (2008). 7 Free Will Is Un-Natural. In John Baer, James C. Kaufman & Roy F. Baumeister (eds.), Are We Free?: Psychology and Free Will. Oxford University Press 128.
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  4.  29
    John A. Bargh, Kay L. Schwader, Sarah E. Hailey, Rebecca L. Dyer & Erica J. Boothby (2012). Automaticity in Social-Cognitive Processes. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (12):593-605.
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  5. John A. Bargh (2007). Social Psychological Approaches to Consciousness. In Philip David Zelazo, Morris Moscovitch & Evan Thompson (eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of Consciousness. Cambridge 555--569.
  6.  36
    P. Gollwitzer & John A. Bargh (eds.) (1996). The Psychology of Action: Linking Cognition and Motivation to Behavior. Guilford.
    Moving beyond the traditional, and unproductive, rivalry between the fields of motivation and cognition, this book integrates the two domains to shed new light ...
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  7.  42
    Brian P. Meier, Simone Schnall, Norbert Schwarz & John A. Bargh (2012). Embodiment in Social Psychology. Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (4):705-716.
    Psychologists are increasingly interested in embodiment based on the assumption that thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are grounded in bodily interaction with the environment. We examine how embodiment is used in social psychology, and we explore the ways in which embodied approaches enrich traditional theories. Although research in this area is burgeoning, much of it has been more descriptive than explanatory. We provide a critical discussion of the trajectory of embodiment research in social psychology. We contend that future researchers should engage (...)
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  8.  2
    Julie Y. Huang & John A. Bargh (2014). The Selfish Goal: Autonomously Operating Motivational Structures as the Proximate Cause of Human Judgment and Behavior. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (2):121-135.
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  9.  23
    Ran R. Hassin, John A. Bargh, Andrew D. Engell & Kathleen C. McCulloch (2009). Implicit Working Memory. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (3):665-678.
    Working Memory plays a crucial role in many high-level cognitive processes . The prevalent view holds that active components of WM are predominantly intentional and conscious. This conception is oftentimes expressed explicitly, but it is best reflected in the nature of major WM tasks: All of them are blatantly explicit. We developed two new WM paradigms that allow for an examination of the role of conscious awareness in WM. Results from five studies show that WM can operate unintentionally and outside (...)
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  10.  16
    Melissa J. Ferguson & John A. Bargh (2004). How Social Perception Can Automatically Influence Behavior. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (1):33-39.
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  11. John A. Bargh (ed.) (2007). Social Psychology and the Unconscious: The Automaticity of Higher Mental Processes. Psychology Press.
  12.  22
    John A. Bargh (2005). Bypassing the Will: Toward Demystifying the Nonconscious Control of Social Behavior. In Ran R. Hassin, James S. Uleman & John A. Bargh (eds.), The New Unconscious. Oxford Series in Social Cognition and Social Neuroscience. Oxford University Press 37-58.
  13.  30
    Ezequiel Morsella, John A. Bargh & Peter M. Gollwitzer (eds.) (2009). Oxford Handbook of Human Action. Oxford University Press.
    This volume brings together this new knowledge in a single, concise source, covering most if not all of the basic questions regarding human action: What are the ...
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  14.  59
    John A. Bargh (1996). Automaticity in Action: The Unconscious as Repository of Chronic Goals and Motives. In P. Gollwitzer & John A. Bargh (eds.), The Psychology of Action: Linking Cognition and Motivation to Behavior. Guilford 457.
  15.  18
    John A. Bargh & Lawrence E. Williams (2007). The Nonconscious Regulation of Emotion. In James J. Gross (ed.), Handbook of Emotion Regulation. Guilford Press 1--429.
  16. John A. Bargh (1996). Principles of Automaticity. In E. E. Higgins & A. Kruglanski (eds.), Social Psychology: Handbook of Basic Principles. Guilford 169--183.
     
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  17.  32
    Ezequiel Morsella, Travis A. Riddle & John A. Bargh (2009). Undermining the Foundations: Questioning the Basic Notions of Associationism and Mental Representation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (2):218-219.
    Perhaps the time has come to re-examine the basic notions of cognitive science. Together with previous challenges against associationism, the target article should be viewed as a call to arms to re-evaluate the empirical basis for contemporary conceptualizations of human learning and the notion of a concept that has become too imprecise for describing the elements of cognition.
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  18. Melissa J. Ferguson & John A. Bargh (2003). The Constructive Nature of Automatic Evaluation. In Jochen Musch & Karl C. Klauer (eds.), The Psychology of Evaluation: Affective Processes in Cognition and Emotion. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates 169--188.
     
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  19. Ruud Custers, Baruch Eitam & John A. Bargh (2012). Conscious and Unconscious Processes in Goal Pursuit. In Henk Aarts & Andrew J. Elliot (eds.), Goal-Directed Behavior. Psychology Press
     
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  20. Ezequiel Morsella, Stephen C. Krieger & John A. Bargh (2009). The Primary Function of Consciousness: Why Skeletal Muscles Are Voluntary Muscles. In Ezequiel Morsella, John A. Bargh & Peter M. Gollwitzer (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Human Action. Oxford University Press
  21.  6
    E. Tory Higgins & John A. Bargh (1992). Unconscious Sources of Subjectivity and Suffering: Is Consciousness the Solution. In L. Martin & A. Tesser (eds.), The Construction of Social Judgments. Lawrence Erlbaum 67--103.
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  22. John A. Bargh (1992). Does Subliminality Matter to Social Psychology? Awareness of the Stimulus Versus Awareness of its Influence. In Robert F. Bornstein & T. S. Pittman (eds.), Perception Without Awareness. Guilford
     
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  23.  7
    John A. Bargh, Lawrence E. Williams, Julie Y. Huang, Hyunjin Song & Joshua M. Ackerman (2010). From the Physical to the Psychological: Mundane Experiences Influence Social Judgment and Interpersonal Behavior. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (4):267-268.
    Mere physical experiences of warmth, distance, hardness, and roughness are found to activate the more abstract psychological concepts that are analogically related to them, such as interpersonal warmth and emotional distance, thereby influencing social judgments and interpersonal behavior without the individual's awareness. These findings further support the principle of neural reuse in the development and operation of higher mental processes.
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  24.  25
    Mark Chen, Tanya L. Chartrand, Annette Y. Lee-Chai & John A. Bargh (1998). Priming Primates: Human and Otherwise. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (5):685-686.
    The radical nub of Byrne & Russon's argument is that passive priming effects can produce much of the evidence of higher-order cognition in nonhuman primates. In support of their position we review evidence of similar behavioral priming effects n humans. However, that evidence further suggests that even program-level imitative behavior can be produced through priming.
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  25. John A. Bargh (1996). Automaticity in Social Psychology. In E. E. Higgins & A. Kruglanski (eds.), Social Psychology: Handbook of Basic Principles. Guilford
     
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  26.  23
    Ezequiel Morsella & John A. Bargh (2007). Supracortical Consciousness: Insights From Temporal Dynamics, Processing-Content, and Olfaction. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (1):100.
    To further illuminate the nature of conscious states, it may be progressive to integrate Merker's important contribution with what is known regarding (a) the temporal relation between conscious states and activation of the mesodiencephalic system; (b) the nature of the information (e.g., perceptual vs. premotor) involved in conscious integration; and (c) the neural correlates of olfactory consciousness. (Published Online May 1 2007).
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  27.  7
    Julie Y. Huang & John A. Bargh (2011). The Selfish Goal: Self-Deception Occurs Naturally From Autonomous Goal Operation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (1):27-28.
    Self-deception may be a natural consequence of active goal operation instead of an adaptation for negotiating the social world. We argue that because autonomous goal programs likely drove human judgment and behavior prior to evolution of a central executive or these goal programs can operate independently to attain their desired end states and thereby produce outcomes that the individual.
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  28. John A. Bargh (2004). Being Here Now: Is Consciousness Necessary for Human Freedom? In Jeff Greenberg, Sander L. Koole & Tom Pyszczynski (eds.), Handbook of Experimental Existential Psychology. Guilford Press 385-397.
     
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  29.  3
    Ruud Custers, Baruch Eitam & John A. Bargh (2012). I T is Hard to Miss That We Are Capable of Consciously Reflecting on Our Thoughts, Our Doings, and the World Around Us. When We Wake Up in the Morning. In Henk Aarts & Andrew J. Elliot (eds.), Goal-Directed Behavior. Psychology Press 231.
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  30.  2
    Julie Y. Huang & John A. Bargh (2014). Multitudes of Perspectives: Integrating the Selfish Goal Model with Views on Scientific Metaphors, Goal Systems, and Society. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 38 (1):159-175.
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  31. John A. Bargh (2005). People Are Often Unaware of the Reasons and Causes of Their Own Behavior. In Fact, Recent Experimental Evidence Points to a Deep and Fundamental Disso-37. In Ran R. Hassin, James S. Uleman & John A. Bargh (eds.), The New Unconscious. Oxford University Press 37.
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  32. John A. Bargh (ed.) (2007). Social Psychology and the Unconscious: The Automaticity of Higher Mental Processes. Frontiers of Social Psychology. Psychology Press.
  33.  20
    Ran R. Hassin, James S. Uleman & John A. Bargh (eds.) (2005). The New Unconscious. Oxford Series in Social Cognition and Social Neuroscience. Oxford University Press.
    Over the past two decades, a new picture of the unconscious has emerged from a variety of disciplines that are broadly part of cognitive science. According to this picture, unconscious processes seem to be capable of doing many things that were thought to require intention, deliberation, and conscious awareness. Moreover, they accomplish these things without the conflict and drama of the psychoanalytic unconscious. These processes range from complex information processing, through goal pursuit and emotions, to cognitive control and self-regulation. This (...)
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  34. E. E. Higgins & John A. Bargh (1992). Unconscious Sources of Subjectivity and Suffering: Is Consciousness the Solution? In L. Martin & A. Tesser (eds.), The Construction of Social Judgments. Lawrence Erlbaum
     
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