Search results for 'John A. Brierley' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. John A. Brierley & Christopher J. Cowton (2000). Putting Meta-Analysis to Work: Accountants' Organizational-Professional Conflict. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 24 (4):343 - 353.score: 960.0
    Commentators on empirical research in business ethics have recommended that use should be made of meta-analysis – the quantitative analysis of a group of research studies. This paper elaborates upon those recommendations by conducting, as a "case study" for further reflection, a meta-analysis of studies of accountants' organizational-professional conflict (OPC) previously published in accounting and psychology journals. Of five variables capable of analysis, only the population correlation coefficient between OPC and organizational tenure is identified. It was not possible to find (...)
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  2. J. Brierley, J. Linthicum & A. Petros (2013). Should Religious Beliefs Be Allowed to Stonewall a Secular Approach to Withdrawing and Withholding Treatment in Children? Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (9):573-577.score: 600.0
    Religion is an important element of end-of-life care on the paediatric intensive care unit with religious belief providing support for many families and for some staff. However, religious claims used by families to challenge cessation of aggressive therapies considered futile and burdensome by a wide range of medical and lay people can cause considerable problems and be very difficult to resolve. While it is vital to support families in such difficult times, we are increasingly concerned that deeply held belief in (...)
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  3. Joe Brierley & Vic Larcher (2011). Cui Bono? Can Feminist Ethics Show a Path in Complex Decision-Making Where 'Classical' Theories Cannot? Clinical Ethics 6 (2):86-90.score: 420.0
    We present the case of a six-year-old child with a fatal brainstem tumour, who was left in a ‘locked-in state’ post-decompressive biopsy. A discussion of the ethical dilemma this situation presents, together with the deliberations of the ethics service when consulted about the optimal course of action, follow. The issues raised highlight an important conflict between the parental view of what is in the child's best interests and what may appear, prima facie, to clinical staff, to be in that child's (...)
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  4. Gwen Brierley, Sally Brabyn, David Torgerson & Judith Watson (2012). Bias in Recruitment to Cluster Randomized Trials: A Review of Recent Publications. [REVIEW] Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (4):878-886.score: 360.0
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  5. R. J. Berry, Michael Brierley, David A. Brondos, Elizabeth M. Bucar, Barbra Barnett & Lisa Sowle Cahill (2006). We Acknowledge with Thanks Receipt of the Following Titles. Inclusion in This List Neither Implies nor Precludes Subsequent Review. Ariarajah, S. Wesley, Axis of Peace: Christian Faith in Times of Violence and War (Geneva: WCC Publications, 2004). 137 Pp. No Price (Pb), ISBN. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 19:273-276.score: 240.0
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  6. D. Funnell, C. Fertleman, L. Carrey & J. Brierley (2012). Quantitative Valuation Placed by Children and Teenagers on Participation in Two Hypothetical Research Scenarios. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (11):686-691.score: 120.0
    For paediatric medicine to advance, research must be conducted specifically with children. Concern about poor recruitment has led to debate about payments to child research participants. Although concerns about undue influence by such ‘compensation’ have been expressed, it is useful to determine whether children can relate the time and inconvenience associated with participation to the value of payment offered. This study explores children's ability to determine fair remuneration for research participation, and reviews payments to children participating in research. Forty children (...)
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  7. J. Savulescu (2013). Just Dying: The Futility of Futility. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (9):583-584.score: 24.0
    I argue that Brierley et al are wrong to claim that parents who request futile treatment are acting against the interests of their child. A better ethical ground for withholding or withdrawing life-prolonging treatment is not that it is in the interests of the patient to die, but rather on grounds of the limitation of resources and the requirements of distributive justice. Put simply, not all treatment that might be in a person's interests must ethically be provided.
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  8. M. Sheehan (2013). Religious Red Herrings. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (9):585-586.score: 24.0
    Brierley et al take big polarised political debates deep into the context of paediatric intensive care. They are concerned that ‘deeply held belief in religion leads to children being potentially subjected to burdensome care’. However, it can be argued that they make a mistake in categorising this as a problem derived from religion, religious belief or the depth of religious conviction. Religion here is a red herring.
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  9. Steve Clarke (1997). When to Believe in Miracles. American Philosophical Quarterly 34 (1):95 - 102.score: 24.0
    Brierley et al argue that in cases where it is medically futile to continue providing life-sustaining therapies to children in intensive care, medical professionals should be allowed to withdraw such therapies, even when the parents of these children believe that there is a chance of a miracle cure taking place. In reasoning this way, Brierley et al appear to implicitly assume that miracle cures will never take place, but they do not justify this assumption and it would be (...)
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  10. Gregory L. Bock (2013). Cultural Sensitivity in Paediatrics. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (9):579-581.score: 24.0
    In a recent Journal of Medical Ethics article, ‘Should Religious Beliefs Be Allowed to Stonewall a Secular Approach to Withdrawing and Withholding Treatment in Children?’, Joe Brierley, Jim Linthicum and Andy Petros argue for rapid intervention in cases of futile life-sustaining treatment. In their experience, when discussions of futility are initiated with parents, parents often appeal to religion to ‘stonewall’ attempts to disconnect their children from life support. However, I will argue that the intervention that the authors propose is (...)
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