Search results for 'John A. Fischer' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  2
    John Martin Fischer (1991). Soft Facts and Harsh Realities: Reply to William Craig: John Martin Fischer. Religious Studies 27 (4):523-539.
    . In a number of papers I have sought to discuss and cast some doubt on a certain strategy of response to an argument that purports to show that God's foreknowledge is incompatible with human freedom. This argument proceeds from the alleged ‘fixity of the past’ to the conclusion that God's foreknowledge is incompatible with human freedom. William Lane Craig has criticized my approach to these issues. Here I should like to respond to some of Craig's claims. My goal is (...)
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  2.  16
    R. W. Fischer (2011). A World For Us: The Case for Phenomenalistic Idealism. By John Foster. Heythrop Journal 52 (1):170-171.
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  3.  48
    John Martin Fischer (2012). Deep Control: A Theory of Moral Responsibility. OUP USA.
    In this collection of essays -- a follow up to My Way and Our Stories -- John Martin Fischer defends the contention that moral responsibility is associated with "deep control". Fischer defines deep control as the middle ground between two untenable extreme positions: "superficial control" and "total control". -/- Our freedom consists of the power to add to the given past, holding fixed the laws of nature, and therefore, Fischer contends, we must be able to interpret (...)
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  4.  30
    Scott MacDonald, John Martin Fischer, Carl Ginet, Joseph Margolis, Mark Case, Elie Noujain, Robert Kane & Derk Pereboom (2000). Excerpts From John Martin Fischer's Discussion with Members of the Audience. Journal of Ethics 4 (4):408 - 417.
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  5.  11
    Clara Fischer (2014). Gendered Readings of Change: A Feminist-Pragmatist Approach. Palgrave Macmillan.
    In Gendered Readings of Change, Clara Fischer develops a unique theory of change by drawing on American philosophy and contemporary feminist thought. Via a select history of ancient Greek and Pragmatist philosophies of change, she argues for a reconstruction of transformation that is inclusive of women's experiences and thought. With wide-ranging analysis, this book addresses ontological, moral, epistemological, and political questions, and includes an insightful exploration of the philosophies of Parmenides, Aristotle, John Dewey, Iris Young, and Jane Addams.
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  6. John Martin Fischer (2006). My Way: Essays on Moral Responsibility. Oxford University Press.
    This is a selection of essays on moral responsibility that represent the major components of John Martin Fischer's overall approach to freedom of the will and moral responsibility. The collection exhibits the overall structure of Fischer's view and shows how the various elements fit together to form a comprehensive framework for analyzing free will and moral responsibility. The topics include deliberation and practical reasoning, freedom of the will, freedom of action, various notions of control, and moral accountability. (...)
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  7.  82
    John Martin Fischer & Neal A. Tognazzini (2010). Blame and Avoidability: A Reply to Otsuka. Journal of Ethics 14 (1):43 - 51.
    In a fascinating recent article, Michael Otsuka seeks to bypass the debates about the Principle of Alternative Possibilities by presenting and defending a different, but related, principle, which he calls the “Principle of Avoidable Blame.” According to this principle, one is blameworthy for performing an act only if one could instead have behaved in an entirely blameless manner. Otsuka claims that although Frankfurt-cases do undermine the Principle of Alternative Possibilities, they do not undermine the Principle of Avoidable Blame. In this (...)
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  8.  63
    John Martin Fischer & Neal A. Tognazzini (2007). Exploring Evil and Philosophical Failure: A Critical Notice of Peter van Inwagen's *The Problem of Evil. Faith and Philosophy 24 (4):458-474.
    In his recent book on the problem of evil, Peter van Inwagen argues that both the global and local arguments from evil are failures. In this paper, we engagevan Inwagen’s book at two main points. First, we consider his understanding of what it takes for a philosophical argument to succeed. We argue that while his criterion for success is interesting and helpful, there is good reason to think it is too stringent. Second, we consider his responses to the global (...)
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  9. John Martin Fischer (2009). Our Stories: Essays on Life, Death, and Free Will. Oxford University Press.
    Introduction: "meaning in life and death : our stories" -- John Martin Fischer and Anthony B rueckner, "Why is death bad?", Philosophical studies, vol. 50, no. 2 (September 1986) -- "Death, badness, and the impossibility of experience," Journal of ethics -- John Martin Fischer and Daniel Speak, "Death and the psychological conception of personal identity," Midwest studies in philosophy, vol. 24 -- "Earlier birth and later death : symmetry through thick and thin," Richard Feldman, Kris McDaniel, (...)
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  10.  27
    John A. Fischer (1987). Taking Sympathy Seriously: A Defense of Our Moral Psychology Toward Animals. Environmental Ethics 9 (3):197-215.
    Sympathy for animals is regarded by many thinkers as theoretically disreputable. Against this I argue that sympathy appropriately underlies moral concern for animals. I offer an account of sympathy that distinguishes sympathy with from sympathy for fellow creatures, and I argue that both can be placed on an objective basis, if we differentiate enlightened from folk sympathy. Moreover, I suggest that sympathy for animals is not, as some have claimed, incompatible with environmentalism; on the contrary, it can ground environmental concern. (...)
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  11.  78
    John Martin Fischer & Neal A. Tognazzini (2013). The Logic of Theological Incompatibilism: A Reply to Westphal. Analysis 73 (1):46-48.
    In our paper, "Omniscience, Freedom, and Dependence" (Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 88: 346-367), we argued that recent attempts (by Merricks, McCall, and Westphal) to resolve the dilemma of freedom and foreknowledge fail because they are question-begging. Westphal replied to our paper in an earlier issue of Analysis, and this article is our rejoinder to his reply.
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  12.  14
    E. M. A. (1934). The Philosophy of John Dewey. A Critical Analysis. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 31 (21):583-584.
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  13.  27
    Joseph D. John (2007). Experience as Medium: John Dewey and a Traditional Japanese Aesthetic. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 21 (2):83 - 90.
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  14.  19
    D. L. A. (1926). Statement and Inference with Other Philosophical Papers. By John Cook Wilson, Sometime Wykeham Professor of Logic in the University of Oxford. Edited From the MSS. By A. S. L. Farquharson, Fellow of University College. With a Portrait, Memoir, and Selected Correspondence. [REVIEW] Philosophy 1 (4):511.
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  15.  6
    G. P. A. (1887). Gai Iuli Caesaris de Bello Gallico Cominentarii, After the German of Kraner-Dittenberger. By Rev. John Bond, M.A., and A. S. Walpole, M.A. London. Macmillan. 6s. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 1 (08):233-.
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  16.  2
    C. P. A. (1956). John Duns Scotus: A Teacher for Our Times. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 10 (1):183-183.
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  17.  1
    G. A. (1985). Sir John Paston's “Grete Boke”: A Descriptive Catalogue, with an Introduction, of British Library MS Lansdowne 285. [REVIEW] Speculum 60 (3):699-701.
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  18. H. R. Fischer, G. D. Atkins, M. L. Johnson, J. L. Austin, P. Baker, T. Ballauff, E. Behler, D. Benner, R. J. Bernstein & L. E. Beyer (2001). Ferrari, GRF 92 Ferry, L. And Renaut, A. 33, 219 Ffrench, P. 226 Fischer, F. Et Al. 18–19. In Gert Biesta & Denise Egéa-Kuehne (eds.), Derrida & Education. Routledge
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  19. John Locke & James Augustus St John (1854). The Works of John Locke. Philosophical Works, with a Preliminary Essay and Notes by J.A. St. John.
     
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  20.  18
    John Martin Fischer (1989). God, Foreknowledge, and Freedom. Stanford University Press.
    Introduction: God and Freedom John Martin Fischer Imagine that in some remote part of Connecticut there is a computer that has stored in its memory all truths about your life — past, present, and future. The computer contains all the ...
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  21. John Martin Fischer (2014). Deep Control: Essays on Free Will and Value. OUP Usa.
    In this collection of essays -- a follow up to My Way and Our Stories -- John Martin Fischer defends the contention that moral responsibility is associated with "deep control". Fischer defines deep control as the middle ground between two untenable extreme positions: "superficial control" and "total control".
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  22. John Martin Fischer (2007). My Way: Essays on Moral Responsibility. OUP Oxford.
    This is a selection of essays on moral responsibility that represent the major components of John Martin Fischer's overall approach to freedom of the will and moral responsibility. The collection exhibits the overall structure of Fischer's view and shows how the various elements fit together to form a comprehensive framework for analyzing free will and moral responsibility.
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  23. John Martin Fischer & Benjamin Mitchell-Yellin (2016). Near-Death Experiences: Understanding Our Visions of the Afterlife. Oxford University Press Usa.
    Near-death experiences offer a glimpse not only into the nature of death but also into the meaning of life. They are not only useful tools to aid in the human quest to understand death but are also deeply meaningful, transformative experiences for the people who have them. In a unique contribution to the growing and popular literature on the subject, philosophers John Martin Fischer and Benjamin Mitchell-Yellin examine prominent near-death experiences, such as those of Pam Reynolds, Eben Alexander (...)
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  24. John Martin Fischer (2016). Our Fate: Essays on God and Free Will. Oxford University Press Usa.
    Our Fate is a collection of John Martin Fischer's previously published articles on the relationship between God's foreknowledge and human freedom. The book contains a new introductory essay that places all of the chapters in the book into a cohesive framework. The introductory essay also provides some new views about the issues treated in the book, including a bold and original account of God's foreknowledge of free actions in a causally indeterministic world. The focus of the book is (...)
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  25. John Martin Fischer (2011). Our Stories: Essays on Life, Death, and Free Will. OUP Usa.
    In this collection of essays on the metaphysical issues pertaining to death, the meaning of life, and freedom of the will, John Martin Fischer argues that death can be a bad thing for the individual who dies.
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  26. John Perry, Michael Bratman & John Martin Fischer (eds.) (2007). Introduction to Philosophy: Classical and Contemporary Readings. Oxford University Press.
    Introduction to Philosophy, Fourth Edition, is the most comprehensive topically organized collection of classical and contemporary philosophy available. Building on the exceptionally successful tradition of previous editions, this edition for the first time incorporates the insights of a new coeditor, John Martin Fischer, and has been updated and revised to make it more accessible. Ideal for introductory philosophy courses, the text includes sections on the meaning of life, God and evil, knowledge and reality, the philosophy of science, the (...)
     
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  27.  15
    Hannah Tierney (2016). A Pilgrimage Through John Martin Fischer’s Deep Control: Essays on Free Will and Value. Criminal Law and Philosophy 10 (1):179-196.
    John Martin Fischer’s most recent collection of essays, Deep Control: Essays on Free Will and Value, is both incredibly wide-ranging and impressively detailed. Fischer manages to cover a staggering amount of ground in the free will debate, while also providing insightful and articulate analyses of many of the positions defended in the field. In this collection, Fischer focuses on the relationship between free will and moral responsibility. In the first section of his book, Fischer (...)
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  28.  42
    John Perry (2008). Can't We All Just Be Compatibilists?: A Critical Study of John Martin Fischer's My Way. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 12 (2):157 - 166.
    My aim in this study is not to praise Fischer's fine theory of moral responsibility, but to (try to) bury the "semi" in "semicompatibilism". I think Fischer gives the Consequence Argument (CA) too much credit, and gives himself too little credit. In his book, The Metaphysics of Free Will, Fischer gave the CA as good a statement as it will ever get, and put his finger on what is wrong with it. Then he declared stalemate rather than (...)
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  29. John Perry (2008). Can’T We All Just Be Compatibilists?: A Critical Study of John Martin Fischer’s My Way. Journal of Ethics 12 (2):157-166.
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  30. Michael McKenna (2001). John Martin Fischer and Mark Ravizza: Responsibility and Control: A Theory of Moral Responsibility. Journal of Philosophy 98 (2):93-100.
     
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  31.  36
    James Stacey Taylor (2001). John Martin Fischer and Mark Ravizza, Responsibility and Control: A Theory of Moral Responsibility. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 35 (1):125-130.
  32.  12
    Paul Russell (2002). Critical Notice of John Martin Fischer and Mark Ravizza, Responsibility and Control: A Theory of Moral Responsibility. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 32 (4):587-606.
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  33. Arthur Ripstein (1998). John Martin Fischer and Mark Ravizza, Responsibility and Control: A Theory of Moral Responsibility Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 18 (6):416-418.
     
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  34.  14
    Keith Culver (1999). Fischer, John Martin, and Mark Ravizza. Responsibility and Control: A Theory of Moral Responsibility. Review of Metaphysics 53 (2):444-446.
  35.  38
    Gideon Yaffe (2000). Review of John Fischer and Mark Ravizza's Responsibility and Control: A Theory of Moral Responsibility. [REVIEW] Erkenntnis 53 (3):429-434.
  36.  1
    Wendell V. Harris (1993). Edwin Stein, Joseph Gibaldi, Fernand Hallyn, Timothy Hampton, Allan H. Pasco, John F. Desmond, Walter Adamson, Robert T. Corum, Mary Anne O'Neil, David Gorman, Richard Kaplan, Michael Weber, Willard Bohn, William E. Cain, Ronald Bogue, English Showalter, Michael Winkler, Richard Eldridge, Michael McClintick, Leslie D. Harris, Paul Taylor, John J. Stuhr, David Novitz, Paul Trembath, Mark Stocker, Michael McGaha, Patricia A. Ward, Michael Fischer, Michael Lopez, Ruth Ap Roberts, Gerald Prince. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Literature 17 (2):343.
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  37. Alfred Louch (1991). Walter E. Broman, Allan H. Pasco, Michael L. Hall, John F. Desmond, Steven Rendall, Robert Tobin, Marilyn R. Schuster, Tom Conley, Peter Losin, William E. Cain, Will Morrisey, Richard A. Watson, Christopher Wise, Stephen Davies, C. S. Schreiner, James E. Dittes, Michael Fischer, Eva M. Knodt, Karsten Harries, Robert C. Solomon, Stephen Nathanson, Robert D. Cottrell, Zack Bowen, Mary Bittner Wiseman, Edward E. Foster, Kathleen Marie Higgins, Richard Freadman, Patrick Henry. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Literature 15 (2):323.
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  38.  9
    Michael S. McKenna (1997). John Martin Fischer's The Metaphysics of Free Will: An Essay on Control. Legal Theory 3 (4):379-397.
    John Martin Fischer's The Metaphysics of Free Will is devoted to two major projects. First, Fischer defends the thesis that determinism is incompatible with a person's control over alternatives to the actual future. Second, Fischer defends the striking thesis that such control is not necessary for moral responsibility. This review essay examines Fischer's arguments for each thesis. Fischer's defense of the incompatibilist thesis is the most innovative to date, and I argue that his formulation (...)
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  39.  11
    Derk Pereboom (2014). Responses to John Martin Fischer and Dana Nelkin. [REVIEW] Science, Religion and Culture 1 (3):218.
    I first want to thank John Fischer for his generous appraisal of the book, and for his astute and challenging comments on my treatment of the manipulation argument in Chapter 4. Fischer’s core strategy for resisting this argument is a soft-line reply. Soft-liners claim that in some manipulation cases the agent is not morally responsible, and in others he is. A corollary of the soft-line reply is that there is a plausible compatibilist condition on moral responsibility that (...)
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  40.  12
    Daniel James Speak (1999). Fischer and Avoidability: A Reply to Widerker and Katzoff. Faith and Philosophy 16 (2):239-247.
    In a recent exchange, John M. Fischer and David Widerker have debated whether or not it is appropriate to employ Frankfurt-style examples in efforts to challenge the intuitively plausible “principle of alternative possibilities.” Most recently, David Widerker and Charlotte Katzoff have tried to defend Widerker’s initial claim that such examples beg the question against libertarianism. As a libertarian sympathizer, I would like very much for these arguments to go through. However, I argue here that (1) their “molinist” critique (...)
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  41.  13
    Jens Johansson (2014). Actual and Counterfactual Attitudes: Reply to Brueckner and Fischer. Journal of Ethics 18 (1):11-18.
    In a recent article, I criticized Anthony L. Brueckner and John Martin Fischer’s influential argument—appealing to the rationality of our asymmetric attitudes towards past and future pleasures—against the Lucretian claim that death and prenatal non-existence are relevantly similar. Brueckner and Fischer have replied, however, that my critique involves an unjustified shift in temporal perspectives. In this paper, I respond to this charge and also argue that even if it were correct, it would fail to defend Brueckner and (...)
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  42.  36
    J. Velleman (2012). Comments on John Martin Fischer's Our Stories. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 158 (3):515-521.
    I comment on the three main themes in Our Stories: the harm of death, the narrative structure of life, and the value of immortality. I begin with a subsidiary theme, namely, the use of narrative examples in philosophy.
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  43.  11
    Taylor W. Cyr (2014). Rationally Not Caring About Torture: A Reply to Johansson. Journal of Ethics 18 (4):331-339.
    Death can be bad for an individual who has died, according to the “deprivation approach,” by depriving that individual of goods. One worry for this account of death’s badness is the Lucretian symmetry argument: since we do not regret having been born later than we could have been born, and since posthumous nonexistence is the mirror image of prenatal nonexistence, we should not regret dying earlier than we could have died. Anthony Brueckner and John Martin Fischer have developed (...)
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  44.  7
    Duncan Purves (2015). Torture and Incoherence: A Reply to Cyr. Journal of Ethics 19 (2):213-218.
    John Martin Fischer and Anthony L. Brueckner have argued that a person’s death is, in many cases, bad for him, whereas a person’s prenatal non-existence is not bad for him. Their suggestion relies on the idea that death deprives the person of pleasant experiences that it is rational for him to care about, whereas prenatal non-existence only deprives him of pleasant experiences that it is not rational for him to care about. Jens Johansson has objected to this justification (...)
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  45.  41
    David Zimmerman (2002). Reasons-Responsiveness and Ownership-of-Agency: Fischer and Ravizza's Historicist Theory of Responsibility. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 6 (3):199-234.
    No one has done more than John Martin Fischer and Mark Ravizza to advance our understanding of the important dispute in the theory of responsibility between structuralists and historicists. This makes it all the more important to take the measure of Responsibility and Control, their most recent contribution to the historicist side of the discussion. In this paper I examine some novel features of their most recent version of responsiblity-historicism, especially their new notions of "moderate reasons-responsiveness" and "ownership-of-agency." (...)
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  46.  4
    A. T. Nuyen (1995). Book Reviews : John Martin Fischer, Ed., The Metaphysics of Death. Stanford University Press, Stanford, CA, 1993. Pp. Xiv, 423. Price $45.00 (Cloth), $16.95 (Paper). Jacques Derrida, Aporias. Translated by Thomas Dutoit. Stanford University Press, Stanford, CA, 1993. Pp. X, 87. Price $29.50 (Cloth), $12.95 (Paper). Zygmunt Bauman, Mortality, Immortality and Other Life Strategies. Stanford University Press, Stanford, CA, 1992. Pp. 215. Price $39.50 (Cloth), $14.95 (Paper. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 25 (4):539-545.
  47.  72
    Helen Steward (2008). Moral Responsibility and the Irrelevance of Physics: Fischer's Semi-Compatibilism Vs. Anti-Fundamentalism. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 12 (2):129 - 145.
    The paper argues that it is possible for an incompatibilist to accept John Martin Fischer’s plausible insistence that the question whether we are morally responsible agents ought not to depend on whether the laws of physics turn out to be deterministic or merely probabilistic. The incompatibilist should do so by rejecting the fundamentalism which entails that the question whether determinism is true is a question merely about the nature of the basic physical laws. It is argued that this (...)
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  48.  11
    Taylor W. Cyr (forthcoming). Death’s Badness and Time-Relativity: A Reply to Purves. Journal of Ethics:1-10.
    According to John Martin Fischer and Anthony Brueckner’s unique version of the deprivation approach to accounting for death’s badness, it is rational for us to have asymmetric attitudes toward prenatal and posthumous nonexistence. In previous work, I have defended this approach against a criticism raised by Jens Johansson by attempting to show that Johansson’s criticism relies on an example that is incoherent. Recently, Duncan Purves has argued that my defense reveals an incoherence not only in Johansson’s example but (...)
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  49.  20
    Saul Smilansky (2008). Fischer's Way: The Next Level. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 12 (2):147-155.
    I present an analogy between analytic philosophy and a particular sort of computer game, and analyze some aspects of John Martin Fischer's My Way in the light of this analogy. I set out the different levels of the free will question, and explore how well Fischer does on them. On the compatibility level, he succeeds, in my view, in confronting the "metaphysical challenge" and the "manipulation challenge", but does less well with the "moral arbitrariness challenge". The compatibilist (...)
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  50.  13
    Jens Johansson (2014). More on the Mirror: Reply to Fischer and Brueckner. Journal of Ethics 18 (4):341-351.
    John Martin Fischer and Anthony L. Brueckner have argued that a person’s death is, in many cases, bad for him, whereas a person’s prenatal non-existence is not bad for him. Their suggestion relies on the idea that death deprives the person of pleasant experiences that it is rational for him to care about, whereas prenatal non-existence only deprives him of pleasant experiences that it is not rational for him to care about. In two recent articles in The Journal (...)
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