Search results for 'John A. Fischer' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. R. W. Fischer (2011). A World For Us: The Case for Phenomenalistic Idealism. By John Foster. Heythrop Journal 52 (1):170-171.score: 1890.0
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  2. John Martin Fischer (2012). Deep Control: A Theory of Moral Responsibility. OUP USA.score: 1680.0
    In this collection of essays -- a follow up to My Way and Our Stories -- John Martin Fischer defends the contention that moral responsibility is associated with "deep control". Fischer defines deep control as the middle ground between two untenable extreme positions: "superficial control" and "total control". -/- Our freedom consists of the power to add to the given past, holding fixed the laws of nature, and therefore, Fischer contends, we must be able to interpret (...)
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  3. Scott MacDonald, John Martin Fischer, Carl Ginet, Joseph Margolis, Mark Case, Elie Noujain, Robert Kane & Derk Pereboom (2000). Excerpts From John Martin Fischer's Discussion with Members of the Audience. Journal of Ethics 4 (4):408 - 417.score: 1640.0
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  4. Clara Fischer (2014). Gendered Readings of Change: A Feminist-Pragmatist Approach. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 1530.0
    In Gendered Readings of Change, Clara Fischer develops a unique theory of change by drawing on American philosophy and contemporary feminist thought. Via a select history of ancient Greek and Pragmatist philosophies of change, she argues for a reconstruction of transformation that is inclusive of women's experiences and thought. With wide-ranging analysis, this book addresses ontological, moral, epistemological, and political questions, and includes an insightful exploration of the philosophies of Parmenides, Aristotle, John Dewey, Iris Young, and Jane Addams.
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  5. John Martin Fischer & Neal A. Tognazzini (2010). Blame and Avoidability: A Reply to Otsuka. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 14 (1):43 - 51.score: 1350.0
    In a fascinating recent article, Michael Otsuka seeks to bypass the debates about the Principle of Alternative Possibilities by presenting and defending a different, but related, principle, which he calls the “Principle of Avoidable Blame.” According to this principle, one is blameworthy for performing an act only if one could instead have behaved in an entirely blameless manner. Otsuka claims that although Frankfurt-cases do undermine the Principle of Alternative Possibilities, they do not undermine the Principle of Avoidable Blame. In this (...)
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  6. John Martin Fischer & Neal A. Tognazzini (2007). Exploring Evil and Philosophical Failure: A Critical Notice of Peter Van Inwagen's the Problem of Evil. Faith and Philosophy 24 (4):458-474.score: 1350.0
    In his recent book on the problem of evil, Peter van Inwagen argues that both the global and local arguments from evil are failures. In this paper, we engagevan Inwagen’s book at two main points. First, we consider his understanding of what it takes for a philosophical argument to succeed. We argue that whilehis criterion for success is interesting and helpful, there is good reason to think it is too stringent. Second, we consider his responses to the global andlocal arguments (...)
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  7. John A. Fischer (1987). Taking Sympathy Seriously: A Defense of Our Moral Psychology Toward Animals. Environmental Ethics 9 (3):197-215.score: 1320.0
    Sympathy for animals is regarded by many thinkers as theoretically disreputable. Against this I argue that sympathy appropriately underlies moral concern for animals. I offer an account of sympathy that distinguishes sympathy with from sympathy for fellow creatures, and I argue that both can be placed on an objective basis, if we differentiate enlightened from folk sympathy. Moreover, I suggest that sympathy for animals is not, as some have claimed, incompatible with environmentalism; on the contrary, it can ground environmental concern. (...)
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  8. H. R. Fischer, G. D. Atkins, M. L. Johnson, J. L. Austin, P. Baker, T. Ballauff, E. Behler, D. Benner, R. J. Bernstein & L. E. Beyer (2001). Ferrari, GRF 92 Ferry, L. And Renaut, A. 33, 219 Ffrench, P. 226 Fischer, F. Et Al. 18–19. In Gert Biesta & Denise Egéa-Kuehne (eds.), Derrida & Education. Routledge.score: 1260.0
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  9. John Martin Fischer (2009). Our Stories: Essays on Life, Death, and Free Will. Oxford University Press.score: 1230.0
    Introduction: "meaning in life and death : our stories" -- John Martin Fischer and Anthony B rueckner, "Why is death bad?", Philosophical studies, vol. 50, no. 2 (September 1986) -- "Death, badness, and the impossibility of experience," Journal of ethics -- John Martin Fischer and Daniel Speak, "Death and the psychological conception of personal identity," Midwest studies in philosophy, vol. 24 -- "Earlier birth and later death : symmetry through thick and thin," Richard Feldman, Kris McDaniel, (...)
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  10. John Martin Fischer (2006). My Way: Essays on Moral Responsibility. Oxford University Press.score: 1230.0
    This is a selection of essays on moral responsibility that represent the major components of John Martin Fischer's overall approach to freedom of the will and moral responsibility. The collection exhibits the overall structure of Fischer's view and shows how the various elements fit together to form a comprehensive framework for analyzing free will and moral responsibility. The topics include deliberation and practical reasoning, freedom of the will, freedom of action, various notions of control, and moral accountability. (...)
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  11. John Martin Fischer (1989). God, Foreknowledge, and Freedom. Stanford University Press.score: 1230.0
    Introduction: God and Freedom John Martin Fischer Imagine that in some remote part of Connecticut there is a computer that has stored in its memory all truths about your life — past, present, and future. The computer contains all the ...
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  12. John Perry, Michael Bratman & John Martin Fischer (eds.) (2007). Introduction to Philosophy: Classical and Contemporary Readings. Oxford University Press.score: 1230.0
    Introduction to Philosophy, Fourth Edition, is the most comprehensive topically organized collection of classical and contemporary philosophy available. Building on the exceptionally successful tradition of previous editions, this edition for the first time incorporates the insights of a new coeditor, John Martin Fischer, and has been updated and revised to make it more accessible. Ideal for introductory philosophy courses, the text includes sections on the meaning of life, God and evil, knowledge and reality, the philosophy of science, the (...)
     
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  13. John Martin Fischer & Anthony Brueckner (2014). The Evil of Death: A Reply to Yi. Philosophia 42 (3):741-748.score: 1170.0
    In previous work we have presented a reply to the Lucretian Symmetry, which has it that it is rational to have symmetric attitudes toward prenatal and posthumous nonexistence. Our reply relies on Parfit-style thought-experiments. Here we reply to a critique of our approach by Huiyuhl Yi, which appears in this journal: Brueckner and Fischer on the evil of death. We argue that this critique fails to attend to the specific nature of the thought-experiments (and our associated argument). More specifically, (...)
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  14. John Martin Fischer & Anthony Brueckner (2014). Erratum To: The Evil of Death: A Reply to Yi. Philosophia 42 (4):1169-1169.score: 1170.0
    Erratum to: Philosophia 42:741–748DOI 10.1007/s11406-014-9543-9The original version of this article unfortunately contained a mistake. There were two slight text errors. The correct text information are given below.In the second line of the last paragraph in section "Reply to Yi" right before the "Conclusion", the text should read as:“atypical or, as Yi suggests, are more typical than we appear to suppose”.andIn the middle of the same paragraph, the text should read as:“…Note that a proponent of the Brueckner/Fischer approach can accept (...)
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  15. John Martin Fischer & Mark Ravizza (1998). Responsibility and Control: A Theory of Moral Responsibility. Cambridge University Press.score: 900.0
    This book provides a comprehensive, systematic theory of moral responsibility. The authors explore the conditions under which individuals are morally responsible for actions, omissions, consequences, and emotions. The leading idea in the book is that moral responsibility is based on 'guidance control'. This control has two components: the mechanism that issues in the relevant behavior must be the agent's own mechanism, and it must be appropriately responsive to reasons. The book develops an account of both components. The authors go on (...)
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  16. John Martin Fischer & Anthony Brueckner (2013). The Evil of Death and the Lucretian Symmetry: A Reply to Feldman. Philosophical Studies 163 (3):783-789.score: 900.0
    In previous work we have defended the deprivation account of death’s badness against worries stemming from the Lucretian point that prenatal and posthumous nonexistence are deprivations of the same sort. In a recent article in this journal, Fred Feldman has offered an insightful critique of our Parfitian strategy for defending the deprivation account of death’s badness. Here we adjust, clarify, and defend our strategy for reply to Lucretian worries on behalf of the deprivation account.
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  17. Patrick Todd & John Martin Fischer (2011). The Truth About Freedom: A Reply to Merricks. Philosophical Review 120 (1):97 - 115.score: 900.0
    In his recent essay in the Philosophical Review, “Truth and Freedom,” Trenton Merricks contends (among other things) that the basic argument for the incompatibility of God's foreknowledge and human freedom is question-begging. He relies on a “truism” to the effect that truth depends on the world and not the other way around. The present essay argues that mere invocation of this truism does not establish that the basic argument for incompatibilism is question-begging. Further, it seeks to clarify important elements of (...)
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  18. John Martin Fischer (2008). My Way and Life's Highway: Replies to Steward, Smilansky, and Perry. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 12 (2):167 - 189.score: 900.0
    I seek to reply to the thoughtful and challenging papers by Helen Steward, Saul Smilansky, and John Perry. Steward argues that agency itself requires access to alternative possibilities; I attempt to motivate my denial of this view. I believe that her view here is no more plausible than the view (which she rejects) that it is unfair to hold someone morally responsible, unless he has genuine access to alternative possibilities. Smilansky contends that compatibilism is morally shallow, and that we (...)
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  19. John Martin Fischer & Anthony Brueckner (2014). Accommodating Counterfactual Attitudes: A Further Reply to Johansson. Journal of Ethics 18 (1):19-21.score: 900.0
    Here we respond to Johansson’s main worry, as laid out in his, “Actual and Counterfactual Attitudes: Reply to Fischer and Brueckner.” We show how our principle BF*(dd*) can be adjusted to address this concern compatibly with our fundamental approach to responding to Lucretius.
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  20. John Martin Fischer & Anthony L. Brueckner (2014). Prenatal and Posthumous Non-Existence: A Reply to Johansson. Journal of Ethics 18 (1):1-9.score: 900.0
    We have argued that it is rational to have asymmetric attitudes toward prenatal and posthumous non-existence insofar as this asymmetry is a special case of a more general (and arguably rational) asymmetry in our attitudes toward past and future pleasures. Here we respond to an interesting critique of our view by Jens Johansson. We contend that his critique involves a crucial and illicit switch in temporal perspectives in the process of considering modal claims (sending us to other possible worlds).
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  21. John Martin Fischer (2013). The Deterministic Horn of the Dilemma Defence: A Reply to Widerker and Goetz. Analysis 73 (3):489-496.score: 900.0
    I have argued that a proponent of the Frankfurt Cases as showing that the Principle of Alternative Possibilities is false can successfully reply to the Dilemma Defense. In their 2013 paper, Widerker and Goetz offer a critique of my view, especially as regards the deterministic horn of the dilemma. Here I clarify my strategy of response to the Dilemma Defense and reply to the critique developed by Widerker and Goetz.
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  22. John Martin Fischer & Neal A. Tognazzini (2011). The Physiognomy of Responsibility. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 82 (2):381-417.score: 810.0
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  23. John Martin Fischer (1996). A New Compatibilism. Philosophical Topics 24 (2):49-66.score: 810.0
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  24. John Martin Fischer & Neal A. Tognazzini (2009). The Truth About Tracing. Noûs 43 (3):531-556.score: 810.0
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  25. John M. Fischer (2008). Freedom, Foreknowledge, and Frankfurt: A Reply to Vihvelin. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 38 (3):pp. 327-342.score: 810.0
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  26. John Martin Fischer & Neal A. Tognazzini (2014). Omniscience, Freedom, and Dependence. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 88 (2):346-367.score: 810.0
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  27. John Martin Fischer (2006). Punishment and Desert: A Reply to Dolinko. Ethics 117 (1):109-118.score: 810.0
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  28. John Martin Fischer & Mark Ravizza (2000). Review: Précis of Responsibility and Control: A Theory of Moral Responsibility. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 61 (2):441 - 445.score: 810.0
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  29. John Martin Fischer & Paul Hoffman (1994). Alternative Possibilities: A Reply to Lamb. Journal of Philosophy 91 (6):321-326.score: 810.0
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  30. John Martin Fischer (2001). Newcomb’s Problem: A Reply to Carlson. Analysis 61 (271):229–236.score: 810.0
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  31. John Martin Fischer (1998). The Metaphysics of Free Will: A Reply to My Critics. Journal of Social Philosophy 29 (2):157-167.score: 810.0
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  32. John Martin Fischer (2006). A Reply to Pereboom, Zimmerman and Smith. Philosophical Books 47 (3):235-244.score: 810.0
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  33. Harriet Baber, David Copp, David Depew, John Dupr, Reinaldo Elugardo, John Martin Fischer, Don Garrett, Richard Healey, Bernard W. Kobes & Bruce Landesman (unknown). The Papers in This Volume Are a Selection of the Papers Presented at the American Philosophical Association Pacific Division Meeting of 1994. The Papers Were Selected by the 1993-1994 Pacific Division Program Committee, Whose Members Include: Jean Hampton (Chair). [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 77 (193):t995.score: 810.0
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  34. Robert Baird, Reagan Ramsower, Stuart E. Rosenbaum, Victoria Davion, Clark Wolf, John Martin Fischer, S. J. Mark Ravizza, Margaret Gilbert, Christopher W. Gowans & Jorge J. Gracia (2000). Almeder, Robert, Human Happiness and Morality: A Brief Introduction to Ethics (Amherst: Prometheus Books, 2000), 211 Pages. Audi, Robert, Epistemology: A Contemporary Introduction to the Theory of Knowledge (London: Routledge, 1998), 340 Pages. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 4:419-422.score: 810.0
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  35. John S. King, Reinhart Ceulemans, Janine M. Albaugh, Sophie Y. Dillen, Jean-Christophe Domec, Regis Fichot, Milan Fischer, Zakiya Leggett, Eric Sucre & Mirek Trnka (2013). The Challenge of Lignocellulosic Bioenergy in a Water-Limited World. BioScience 63 (2):102-117.score: 810.0
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  36. Margaret A. Boden, Richard B. Brandt, Peter Caldwell, Fred Feldman, John Martin Fischer, Richard Hare, David Hume, W. D. Joske, Immanuel Kant, Frederick Kaufman, James Lenman, John Leslie, Steven Luper-Foy, Michaelis Michael, Thomas Nagel, Robert Nozick, Derek Parfit, George Pitcher, Stephen E. Rosenbaum, David Schmidtz, Arthur Schopenhauer, David B. Suits, Richard Taylor & Bernard Williams (2004). Life, Death, and Meaning: Key Philosophical Readings on the Big Questions. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.score: 810.0
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  37. John Martin Fischer (2006). Book Symposium: My Way: Essays on Moral Responsibility: A Reply to Pereboom, Zimmerman and Smith. Philosophical Books 47 (3):235-244.score: 810.0
     
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  38. Clara Cecilia Fischer, Mathew A. Foust, John Lysaker, Timothy Joseph Golden & Hagit Aldema (2012). 1. Front Matter Front Matter (Pp. I-Iii). Journal of Speculative Philosophy 26 (3).score: 810.0
     
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  39. John Martin Fischer (1994). The Metaphysics of Free Will: A Study of Control. Blackwell.score: 810.0
     
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  40. Peter A. French, Howard Wettstein & John Martin Fischer (eds.) (2005). Midwest Studies in Philosophy, Free Will and Moral Responsibility. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 810.0
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  41. John P. Holdren, Paul R. Ehrlich, Anne Ehrlich, Gary Stahl, Berel Lang, Richard H. Popkin, Joseph Margolis, Patrick Morgan, John Hare, Russell Hardin, Richard A. Watson, Gregory S. Kavka, Jean Bethke Elshtain, Sidney Axinn, Terry Nardin, Douglas P. Lackey, Jefferson McMahan, Edmund Pellegrino, Stephen Toulmin, Dietrich Fischer, Edward F. McClennen, Louis Rene Beres, Arne Naess, Richard Falk & Milton Fisk (1986). Nuclear Weapons and the Future of Humanity: The Fundamental Questions. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.score: 810.0
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  42. James Lenman, Tamar Schapiro, Daniel Statman, Harry Brighouse, Adam Swift & John Martin Fischer (2006). 10. Kwong‐Loi Shun and David Wong, Eds., Confucian Ethics: A Comparative Study of Self, Autonomy, and Community Kwong‐Loi Shun and David Wong, Eds., Confucian Ethics: A Comparative Study of Self, Autonomy, and Community (Pp. 156-160). [REVIEW] Ethics 117 (1).score: 810.0
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  43. Roy W. Perrett, Fred Feldman & John Martin Fischer (1995). Confrontations with the Reaper: A Philosophical Study of the Nature and Value of Death.The Metaphysics of Death. Philosophical Quarterly 45 (179):234.score: 810.0
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  44. John Martin Fischer (2012). Deep Control: Essays on Free Will and Value. Oup Usa.score: 720.0
    Fischer here defends the contention that moral responsibility is associated with "deep control", which is "in-between" two untenable extreme positions: "superficial control" and "total control". He defends this "middle way" against the proponents of more--and less--robust notions of the freedom required for moral responsibility. Fischer offers a new solution to the Luck Problem, as well as providing a defense of the compatibility of causal determinism and moral responsibility.
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  45. G. J. Boender, A. A. De Koeijer & E. A. J. Fischer (2012). Derivation of a Floquet Formalism Within a Natural Framework. Acta Biotheoretica 60 (3):303-317.score: 640.0
    Many biological systems experience a periodic environment. Floquet theory is a mathematical tool to deal with such time periodic systems. It is not often applied in biology, because linkage between the mathematics and the biology is not available. To create this linkage, we derive the Floquet theory for natural systems. We construct a framework, where the rotation of the Earth is causing the periodicity. Within this framework the angular momentum operator is introduced to describe the Earth’s rotation. The Fourier operators (...)
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  46. Clara Fischer (2010). Consciousness and Conscience: Feminism, Pragmatism and the Potential for Radical Change. Studies in Social Justice 4 (1):67 - 85.score: 630.0
    Pragmatist philosopher John Dewey famously stated that man is a creature of habit, and not of reason or instinct. In this paper, I will assess Dewey’s explication of the habituated self and the potential it holds for radical transformative processes. In particular, I will examine the process of coming to feminist consciousness, and will show that a feminist-pragmatist reading of change can accommodate a view of the self as responsible agent. Following the elucidation of the changing self, I will (...)
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  47. Clara Fischer (2012). Pragmatists, Deliberativists, and Democracy: The Quest for Inclusion. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 26 (3):497-515.score: 630.0
    Similarities between pragmatist models of democracy and deliberative models have been explored over recent years, most notably in this journal ( Talisse 2004). However, the work of Iris Marion Young has, thus far, not figured in such comparative analyses and historical weighing of pragmatist antecedents in deliberativist work. In what follows, I wish to redress this oversight by placing Young in conversation with John Dewey and Jane Addams. Young's particular brand of deliberative theorizing focuses on the inclusion of women (...)
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  48. Klaus P. Fischer (1975). John Locke in the German Enlightenment: An Interpretation. Journal of the History of Ideas 36.score: 630.0
    A favorite assumption of anglo-American scholarship is that locke's influence "pervaded the eighteenth century with an almost scriptural authority." examining the philosophy of the german enlightenment, This essay disputes the exaggerated importance ascribed to locke in the eighteenth century. Locke's influence was always limited by native traditions inimical to his thought. His empiricism could not compete with the leibniz-Wolff system in which all german philosophers, Including the lockean sympathizers, Were educated. It is true that around mid-Century and beyond locke attracted (...)
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  49. Hannah Tierney (forthcoming). A Pilgrimage Through John Martin Fischer's Deep Control: Essays on Free Will and Value. Criminal Law and Philosophy:1-18.score: 606.0
    John Martin Fischer’s most recent collection of essays, Deep Control: Essays on Free Will and Value, is both incredibly wide-ranging and impressively detailed. Fischer manages to cover a staggering amount of ground in the free will debate, while also providing insightful and articulate analyses of many of the positions defended in the field. In this collection, Fischer focuses on the relationship between free will and moral responsibility. In the first section of his book, Fischer defends (...)
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  50. Stefan Seiler, Andreas Fischer & Sibylle A. Voegtli (2011). Developing Moral Decision-Making Competence: A Quasi-Experimental Intervention Study in the Swiss Armed Forces. Ethics and Behavior 21 (6):452 - 470.score: 600.0
    Moral development has become an integral part in military training and the importance of moral judgment and behavior in military operations can hardly be overestimated. Many armed forces have integrated military ethics and moral decision-making interventions in their training programs. However, little is known about the effectiveness of these interventions. This study examined the effectiveness of a 1-week training program in moral decision making in the Swiss Armed Forces. The program was based on a strategy-based interactional moral dilemma approach. Results (...)
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