1. John Ambrosio (2013). Changing the Subject: Neoliberalism and Accountability in Public Education. Educational Studies 49 (4):316-333.
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  2. John Ambrosio (2010). A Fearsome Trap: The Will to Know, the Obligation to Confess, and the Freudian Subject of Desire. Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (7):728-741.
    The author examines the relation between Michel Foucault's corpus and Freudian psychoanalysis. He argues that Foucault had a complex and changing relationship to psychoanalysis for two primary reasons: his own psychopathology, personal experience, and expressed desire, and due to an ineluctable contradiction at the heart of psychoanalysis itself. The author examines the history of Foucault's personal and scholarly interest in psychology and psychiatry, tracing the emergence, development, and shift in his thought and work. He then argues that Foucault's critique of (...)
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  3. John Ambrosio (2008). Writing the Self: Ethical Self-Formation and the Undefined Work of Freedom. Educational Theory 58 (3):251-267.
    In this essay, John Ambrosio examines the role of ascetic writing practices in Michel Foucault’s conception of ethical self‐formation. Ambrosio argues for an interpretation of Foucault’s later writings as representative of both an extension, and a dramatic break, from his previous writings — from demolishing the subject to embracing the notion of an autonomous and reflexive subject. Ambrosio further contends that Foucault’s notion of ethical self‐formation cannot be divorced from his genealogical method, and that his primary preoccupation near the end (...)
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