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  1. John B. Thompson (2008). Por una teoría interrelacional de los medios. La nueva visibilidad. Telos: Cuadernos de Comunicación E Innovación 74:85-91.
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  2. John B. Thompson (2005). Inside the Publishing World: The Art of Interviewing Publishers. Logos 16 (1):20-26.
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  3. John B. Thompson (1994). Communication and Power: A Response to Some Criticisms. South African Journal of Philosophy 13 (3):133-140.
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  4. John B. Thompson (1993). Ideology and Modern Culture. South African Journal of Philosophy 12 (1):12-18.
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  5. John B. Thompson (1984). Rethinking History: For and Against Marx. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 14 (4):543-551.
  6. John B. Thompson (1984). Studies in the Theory of Ideology. Polity Press.
    Introduction Few areas of social inquiry are more exciting and important, and yet at the same time more marked by controversy and dispute, than the area ...
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  7. John B. Thompson (1982). Ideology and the Social Imaginary. Theory and Society 11 (5):659-681.
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  8. John B. Thompson & David Held (eds.) (1982). Habermas, Critical Debates. Mit Press.
     
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  9. John B. Thompson (1981). Critical Hermeneutics: A Study in the Thought of Paul Ricoeur and Jürgen Habermas. Cambridge University Press.
    This is a study in the philosophy of social science. It takes the form of a comparative critique of three contemporary approaches: ordinary language philosophy, hermeneutics and critical theory, represented here respectively by Ludwig Wittgenstein, Paul Ricoeur and Jürgen Habermas. Part I is devoted to an exposition of these authors' views and of the traditions to which they belong. Its unifying thread is their common concern with language, a concern which nonetheless reveals important differences of approach. For whereas ordinary language (...)
     
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