17 found
Order:
Disambiguations:
John C. McCarthy [17]John Campbell Mccarthy [1]
See also:
  1.  4
    John C. McCarthy (2014). Introduction of John M. Rist, 2014 Aquinas Medal Recipient. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 88:13-16.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  15
    John C. McCarthy (1995). An Introduction to Husserlian Phenomenology. Review of Metaphysics 49 (1):123-125.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  13
    John C. McCarthy (1992). A Path Into Metaphysics. Review of Metaphysics 46 (2):429-430.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  10
    John C. Mccarthy (1999). Encyclopedia of Phenomenology. Review of Metaphysics 52 (3):677-679.
  5.  13
    John C. McCarthy (2000). Nihilism Before Nietzsche. Review of Metaphysics 54 (1):140-143.
  6.  11
    John C. McCarthy (1997). Kolakowski, Leszek. God Owes Us Nothing: A Brief Remark on Pascal's Religion and on the Spirit of Jansenism. Review of Metaphysics 50 (3):669-671.
  7.  5
    John C. McCarthy (1993). God Without Being. Review of Metaphysics 46 (3):627-629.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  3
    John C. McCarthy (1995). The Being of the Maybe: Husserl on Doubting. [REVIEW] Man and World 28 (3):261-281.
  9.  8
    John C. McCarthy (1985). The Imperative of Responsibility. Review of Metaphysics 39 (2):362-364.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  14
    John C. McCarthy (1995). Francis Bacon and the Project of Progress. Review of Metaphysics 49 (1):129-131.
  11.  20
    John C. McCarthy (1994). Some Preliminary Remarks on “Cognitive Interest” in Husserlian Phenomenology. Husserl Studies 11 (3):135-152.
    From an etymological standpoint the word "interest" is well suited to phenomenological investigations, lnteresse, to be among, 1 or as Husserl sometimes translates, Dabeisein, 2 succinctly expresses the sense ofHusserl's more usual term, "intentionality." Mind, he never tired or saying, is not at all another thing alongside the various things of the world; it is already outside itself, and in the company of the things it thinks. Yet despite the appropriateness of "interest" to name this fact of psychic life, only (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  12
    John C. Mccarthy (1998). Tocqueville and the Nature of Democracy. Review of Metaphysics 51 (4):945-947.
  13.  11
    John C. McCarthy (1993). How Knowing the World Completes the World. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 67:71-86.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  5
    John C. McCarthy (2001). La Sagesse du Monde. Review of Metaphysics 55 (1):122-125.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  7
    John C. McCarthy (1999). The Descent of Science. Review of Metaphysics 52 (4):835 - 866.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  1
    John C. Mccarthy (1993). God Without Being: Hors Texte. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 46 (3):627-629.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  1
    John C. McCarthy (1999). Keeping Modern Man in Mind. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1999 (116):175-187.
    It is now a commonplace that premodern reflection, whether mythical, philosophical, or theological, was terminally “anthropomorphic,” given to the erroneous supposition that the human shape offers genuine insight into the shape of everything else.1 It is also commonly assumed that modern philosophy distinguishes itself from its precursors by placing the human being at the center of its concerns. Thus Kant, for example, claimed that the question “what is man?” recapitulates the whole of systematic philosophical inquiry.2 First impressions notwithstanding, these two (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography