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  1. Nancy M. P. King & John C. Moskop (2012). Advance Care Planning and End-of-Life Decision-Making. In D. Micah Hester & Toby Schonfeld (eds.), Guidance for Healthcare Ethics Committees. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  2. John C. Moskop (2005). A Review Of: “Mark P. Aulisio, Robert M. Arnold, and Stuart J. Youngner, Eds. 2003.Ethics Consultation: From Theory to Practice”. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 5 (1):89-90.
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  3. John C. Moskop (2005). A Review Of:“Mark P. Aulisio, Robert M. Arnold, and Stuart J. Youngner, Eds. 2003. Ethics Consultation: From Theory to Practice” Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. 235 Pp. $45.00, Hardcover. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 5 (1):89-90.
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  4. John Harris, Bryan Hilliard, Søren Holm, Kenneth V. Iserson, Avery Kolers, Greg Loeben, Peter Montague & John C. Moskop (2003). Courtney S. Campbell, Ph. D., is Professor and Director, Program for Ethics, Science, and the Environment, Department of Philosophy, Oregon State Uni-Versity, Corvallis, Oregon. Jean E. Chambers, Ph. D., is Associate Professor in the Philosophy Department of the State University of New York, Oswego. She is Currently Working On. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 12:329-330.
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  5. John C. Moskop (2003). Death to Dust: What Happens to Dead Bodies? (2nd Ed.), by Kenneth V. Iserson. Tucson, Ariz.: Galen Press, 2001. 821 Pp. $48.95. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 12 (04):471-472.
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  6. John C. Moskop (2000). Putting Surgical Ethics on the Map. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 3 (2):199-201.
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  7. John C. Moskop (1995). From Futility to Triage. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 20 (2):191-205.
    Basic disagreements about what makes human life valuable hinder use of the concept of futility to decide whether it is appropriate to continue life support for one in a permanent state of unconsciousness, or to provide intensive medical care to one in the last stages of a terminal illness (the "paradigm cases"). Triage planning (the process of establishing criteria for health care prioritization) is an attractive alternative framework for addressing the paradigm cases. Triage planning permits society to see the cases (...)
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  8. John C. Moskop (1988). Book Review. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 9 (2).
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  9. John C. Moskop (1987). The Moral Limits to Federal Funding for Kidney Disease. Hastings Center Report 17 (2):11-15.
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  10. John C. Moskop & Rita L. Saldanha (1986). The Baby Doe Rule: Still a Threat. Hastings Center Report 16 (2):8-14.
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  11. John C. Moskop (1983). Competence, Paternalism, and Public Policy for Mentally Retarded People. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 4 (3).
    This article examines two currently disputed issues regarding public policy for mentally retarded people. First, questions are raised about the legal tradition of viewing mental competence as an all-or-nothing attribute. It is argued that recently developed limited competence and limited guardianship laws can provide greater freedom for retarded people without sacrificing needed protection. Second, the question of who should act paternalistically for retarded people incapable of acting for themselves is examined. Rothman's claim that special formal advocates are the best representatives (...)
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  12. John C. Moskop (1983). Rawlsian Justice and a Human Right to Health Care. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 8 (4):329-338.
    This paper considers whether Rawls' theory of justice as fairness may be used to justify a human right to health care. Though Rawls himself does not discuss health care, other writers have applied Rawls' theory to the provision of health care. Ronald Green argues that contractors in the original position would establish a basic right to health care. Green's proposal, however, requires considerable relaxation of the constraints Rawls places on the original position and thus jeopardizes Rawls' arguments for the two (...)
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  13. Peter Hucklenbroich, Thomas H. Stoffer, John C. Moskop & Wolfgang Eckart (1982). Reviews. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 3 (1):143-148.
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  14. John C. Moskop (1982). Book Review:Philosophy and Medicine Series. H. Tristram Engelhardt, Jr., Stuart F. Spicker; Philosophy and Medicine Series. Vol. 1: Explanation and Evaluation in the Biomedical Sciences. H. Tristram Engelhardt, Jr., Stuart F. Spicker; Philosophy and Medicine Series. Vol. 2: Philosophical Dimensions of the Neuro-Medical Sciences. Stuart F. Spicker, H. Tristram Engelhardt, Jr.; Philosophy and Medicine Series. Vol. 3: Philosophical Medical Ethics: Its Nature and Significance. Stuart F. Spicker, H. Tristram Engelhardt, Jr.; Philosophy and Medicine Series. Vol. 4. Mental Health: Philosophical Perspectives. H. Tristram Engelhardt, Jr., Stuart F. Spicker; Philosophy and Medicine Series. Vol. 5: Mental Illness: Law and Public Policy. Baruch A. Brody, H. Tristram Engelhardt, Jr.; Philosophy and Medicine Series. Vol. 6: Clinical Judgment: A Critical Appraisal. H. Tristram Engelhardt, Jr., Stuart F. Spicker, Bernard Towers; Philosophy and Medicine Series. Vol. 7. Organism, Medicine, and Metaphysi. [REVIEW] Ethics 92 (2):381-.
  15. John C. Moskop (1982). Potential Persons and Murder: A Reply to John Woods. Dialogue 21 (02):307-316.
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  16. John C. Moskop (1981). Medicine, Ethics and the Living Body: A Response to Thomasma and Pellegrino. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 2 (1):19-25.
    This commentary, while sympathetic to Thomasma and Pellegrino [15], raises three sets of questions concerning the adequacy of their view of medicine as a foundation for medical ethical decision-making. The first set of questions concerns the account of the nature of medicine presented by Thomasma and Pellegrino. It is argued that the account is not clearly univocal and that even the most important description offered requires further clarification. Questioned, secondly, is the reasoning used by Thomasma and Pellegrino to propel their (...)
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  17. John C. Moskop (1980). Mill and Hartshorne. Process Studies 10 (1-2):18-33.
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