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John Cleland [5]John G. Cleland [1]
  1. Jean Christophe Fotso, John Cleland, Blessing Mberu, Michael Mutua & Patricia Elungata (2013). Birth Spacing and Child Mortality: An Analysis of Prospective Data From the Nairobi Urban Health and Demographic Surveillance System. Journal of Biosocial Science 45 (6):779-798.
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  2. Cheryl H. Bullard, Rick D. Hogan, Matthew S. Penn, Janet Ferris, John Cleland, Daniel Stier, Ronald M. Davis, Susan Allan, Leticia van de Putte, Virginia Caine, Richard E. Besser & Steven Gravely (2008). Improving Cross-Sectoral and Cross-Jurisdictional Coordination for Public Health Emergency Legal Preparedness. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (s1):57-63.
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  3. Rick Hogan, Cheryl H. Bullard, Daniel Stier, Matthew S. Penn, Teresa Wall, John Cleland, James H. Burch, Judith Monroe, Robert E. Ragland, Thurbert Baker & John Casciotti (2008). Assessing Cross-Sectoral and Cross-Jurisdictional Coordination for Public Health Emergency Legal Preparedness. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (s1):36-52.
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  4. Mohamed Ali & John Cleland (1999). Determinants of Contraceptive Discontinuation in Six Developing Countries. Journal of Biosocial Science 31 (3):343-360.
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  5. Nashid Kamal, Andrew Sloggett & John G. Cleland (1999). Area Variations in Use of Modern Contraception in Rural Bangladesh: A Multilevel Analysis. Journal of Biosocial Science 31 (3):327-341.
    This study in Bangladesh found that inter-cluster variation in the use of modern reversible methods of contraception was significantly attributable to the educational levels of the female family planning workers working in the clusters. Women belonging to clusters served by educated workers had a higher probability of being contraceptive users than those whose workers had only completed primary education. At the household level, important determinants of use were socioeconomic status and religion. At the individual level, the woman being the wife (...)
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  6. John Cleland & Jerome van Ginneken (1989). Maternal Schooling and Childhood Mortality. Journal of Biosocial Science 21 (S10):13-34.
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