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Profile: John Corvino (Wayne State University)
  1. John Corvino (2014). Same-Sex Marriage and the Definitional Objection. In Andrew I. Cohen & Christopher H. Wellman (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Applied Ethics. Wiley Blackwell. 22--277.
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  2. John Corvino (2013). What's Wrong with Gay Marriage? The Philosophers' Magazine 62 (62):33-39.
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  3. John Corvino (2013). What's Wrong with Homosexuality? Oup Usa.
    For the last twenty years John Corvino has traversed the US responding to moral and religious arguments against same-sex relationships. In this timely book, he shares that experience-both by addressing the standard objections and by offering insight into the culture wars more generally. In the process, he makes a fresh case for moral engagement, forcefully rejecting the idea that morality is a 'private matter'.
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  4. John Corvino & Maggie Gallagher (2012). Debating Same-Sex Marriage. Oup Usa.
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  5. John Corvino (2010). Cohon, Rachel . Hume's Morality: Feeling and Fabrication . Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008 . Pp. 285. $75.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Ethics 120 (4):846-851.
  6. John Corvino (2008). Hume and the Second-Quality Analogy. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 6 (2):157-173.
    In this paper I consider Hume's position on the analogy between moral qualities and secondary qualities. Although some have suggested that Hume's use of the analogy is important to his moral philosophy, others have disputed its significance to Hume. My position in this paper is that Hume believes there are indeed similarities between moral and secondary qualities that illuminate the nature of virtue. This paper is divided into two parts. In the first, I consider Hume's point(s) in raising the analogy (...)
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  7. David Benatar, Cheshire Calhoun, Louise Collins, John Corvino, Yolanda Estes, John Finnis, Deirdre Golash, Alan Goldman, Greta Christina, Raja Halwani, Christopher Hamilton, Eva Feder Kittay, Howard Klepper, Andrew Koppelman, Stanley Kurtz, Thomas Mappes, Joan Mason-Grant, Janice Moulton, Thomas Nagel, Jerome Neu, Martha Nussbaum, Alan Soble, Sallie Tisdale, Alan Wertheimer, Robin West & Karol Wojtyla (2007). Philosophy of Sex: Contemporary Readings. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  8. John Corvino (2006). Reframing “Morality Pays”: Toward a Better Answer to “Why Be Moral?” In Business. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 67 (1):1 - 14.
    This paper revisits the “morality pays” approach to answering the “Why be moral?” question in business. First I argue that “morality pays” is weakest when it needs to be strongest, and thus inadequate to the task. Then I examine and reject a proposed virtue-ethics alternative, arguing that it either collapses into “morality pays” or else introduces a new problem. After sketching an account of moral reasons, I go on to argue that “morality pays” can be reframed, not so much as (...)
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  9. John Corvino (2005). Homosexuality and the PIB Argument. Ethics 115 (3):501-534.
  10. Matthew Hanser, Eamonn Callan, John Corvino, John Sabini, Maury Silver & Simon Keller (2005). 10. Charles Taylor, Modern Social Imaginaries Charles Taylor, Modern Social Imaginaries (Pp. 629-633). Ethics 115 (3).
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  11. John Corvino (2002). Loyalty in Business? Journal of Business Ethics 41 (1-2):179 - 185.
    Discussions of loyalty in business typically assume that employees have a prima facieduty of loyalty to their companies, one that sometimes conflicts with other duties, such as the duty to blow the whistle in response to dangerous or unethical practices. Ronald Duska, however, denies the existence of any such duty. According to Duska, one does not have an duty of loyalty to a company, even a prima facieone, because companies are not proper objects of loyalty. He bases this conclusion on (...)
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  12. John Corvino (2002). Naughty Fantasies. Southwest Philosophy Review 18 (1):213-220.
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  13. John Corvino (2001). Justice for Glenn and Stacy. In James P. Sterba (ed.), Social and Political Philosophy: Contemporary Perspectives. Routledge. 300.
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  14. John Corvino (2000). Analyzing Gender. Southwest Philosophy Review 17 (1):173-180.
  15. John Corvino (1996). Hosmer and the "Why Be Moral?" Question. Business Ethics Quarterly 6 (3):373-383.
    In his “Why be Moral? A Different Rationale for Managers,” (Business Ethics Quarterly, Vol. 4, April, 1994), La Rue Tone Hosmer argues that managers should be moral because “acting in ways that can be considered to be ‘right’ and ‘just’ and ‘fair’ is absolutely essential to the long-term competitive success of the firm.” According to Hosmer, moral behavior generates trust among stakeholders, which leads to stakeholder commitment, which leads to increased stakeholder effort, which ultimately leads to corporate success. Though we (...)
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  16. Bill Shaw & John Corvino (1996). Hosmer and The. Business Ethics Quarterly 6 (3):373-383.
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