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  1. John D. Collier, Timeless Laws in a Changing World: Reconciling Physics and Biology.
    Keywords: cosmology, laws, non-equilibrium thermodynamics, information, time, evolution ABSTRACT A major goal of science is to discover laws that underlie all regular phenomena. This goal is best satisfied by eternal principles that leave fundamental properties unchanged and unchangeable. Science has been forced to accept that some processes, especially biological processes, are inherently time oriented. It can either forgo the ideal of universal principles, and account for temporality through specific boundary conditions, or else incorporate the sources of change directly into fundamental (...)
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  2. John D. Collier (2011). Holism and Emergence: Dynamical Complexity Defeats Laplace's Demon. South African Journal of Philosophy 30 (2).
    The paradigm of Laplacean determinism combines three regulative principles: determinism, predictability, and the explanatory adequacy of universal laws together with purely local conditions. Historically, it applied to celestial mechanics, but it has been expanded into an ideal for scientific theories whose cogency is often not questioned. Laplace’s demon is an idealization of mechanistic scientific method. Its principles together imply reducibility, and rule out holism and emergence. I will argue that Laplacean determinism fails even in the realm of planetary dynamics, and (...)
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  3. Konrad Talmont-Kaminski & John D. Collier (2004). Saving the Distinctions: Distinctions as the Epistemologically Significant Content of Experience. In Johann Christian Marek & Maria Elisabeth Reicher (eds.), Contributions of the Austrian Ludwig Wittgenstein Society Xii. Austrian L. Wittgenstein Society, Kirchberg.
    To account for a perceived distinction it is necessary to postulate a real distinction. Our process of experiencing the world is one of, mostly unconscious, interpretation of observed distinctions to provide us with a partial world-picture that is sufficient to guide action. The distinctions, themselves, are acorrigible (they do not have a truth value), directly perceived, structured, and capable of being interpreted. Interpreted experience is corrigible, representational and capable of guiding action. Since interpretation is carried out mostly unconsciously and in (...)
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  4. John D. Collier (1999). Causation is the Transfer of Information. In Howard Sankey (ed.), Causation and Laws of Nature. Kluwer. 215--245.
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  5. John D. Collier & Scott J. Muller (1998). The Dynamical Basis of Emergence in Natural Hierarchies. In G. L. Farre & T. Oksala (eds.), Emergence, Complexity, Hierarchy, Organization, Selected and Edited Papers From the Echo Iii Conference. Acta Polytechnica Scandinavica.
    Since the origins of the notion of emergence in attempts to recover the content of vitalistic anti-reductionism without its questionable metaphysics, emergence has been treated in terms of logical properties. This approach was doomed to failure, because logical properties are either sui generis or they are constructions from other logical properties. If the former, they do not explain on their own and are inevitably somewhat arbitrary (the problem with the related concept of supervenience, Collier, 1988a), but if the latter, reducibility (...)
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  6. John D. Collier (1992). Critical Notice. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 22 (2):287-298.
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  7. John D. Collier (1992). Critical Notice of Paul Thomson's The Structure of Biological Theories. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 22 (2).
    In this critical notice, I argue that the semantic view championed by Thompson no logical advantage over the syntactic view of theories, especially in the area of interpretation. Each weakness of the syntactic view has a corresponding weakness in the semantic view. In principle the two are not different in power, but it is sometimes better to adopt one rather than the other, for practical reasons. I agree with Thompson that many issues in the philosophy of biology can be illuminated (...)
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  8. John D. Collier (1992). The Structure of Biological Theories. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 22 (2):287-298.
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  9. John D. Collier (1990). Could I Conceive Being a Brain in a Vat? Australasian Journal of Philosophy 68 (4):413 – 419.
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  10. John D. Collier (1990). Intrinsic Information. In Philip P. Hanson (ed.), Information, Language and Cognition. University of British Columbia Press. 1--390.
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  11. John D. Collier (1988). Letter to the Editor. Biology and Philosophy 3 (4):501-503.
  12. John D. Collier (1987). Vaulting Ambition. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 17 (4):881-893.
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