15 found
Sort by:
  1. John D. Jones (2008). The Divine Names in John Sarracen's Translation. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 82 (4):661-682.
    I draw on earlier research to develop contrasts between interpreting the conception of God in the Divine Names in terms of Neoplatonic, Latin Scholastic(specifically Albertinian and Thomistic), and Byzantine / Eastern Christian frameworks. Based on these contrasts, I then explore whether Albert the Great and Thomas Aquinas were influenced, and possibly led astray, by John Sarracen’s translation of key terms and phrases in the Divine Names such as (Greek), (Greek)and its cognates, (Greek), (Greek), and (Greek). I conclude that Sarracen’s mistranslation (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. John D. Jones (2006). Confronting Poverty and Stigmatization: An Eastern Orthodox Perspective. Philosophy and Theology 18 (1):169-194.
    The paper develops a preliminary framework for confronting poverty within the Eastern Orthodox Christian tradition. In the first section, I draw on St. Gregory of Nazianzus’s Oration 14 to discuss what is called the stigma of poverty. Although stigmatization is not essentially linked to everyday economic poverty, poor people as such are often subjected to stigmatization. For example, disaffiliation grounded in social rejection was often a distinguishing mark between pôtchos and penês. Moreover, stigmatization in itself constitutes its own form of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. John D. Jones (2006). Guest Editor's Page. Philosophy and Theology 18 (1):195-197.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. John D. Jones (2002). Aquinas on Human Well-Being and the Necessities of Life. The Thomist 66 (1):61-99.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. John D. Jones (2002). Natural Happiness: Perfect Because Self-Sufficient? Aquinas on Nicomachean Ethics 1.7. 1097b14-20. Gregorianum 83 (3):529-544.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. John D. Jones (2001). Poverty as Malum Simpliciter. Philosophy and Theology 13 (2):213-239.
    This article provides critical analysis of Aquinas’s designation of poverty as unqualifiedly evil. This paper provides an analysis of two different meanings of poverty: (a) in relation to things or to the external conditions in which people live and (b) in relation to an action in which people engage or are thwarted. Next, the paper discusses the sense in which poverty is an evil—and particularly, an unqualified evil—in relation to both of these meanings of poverty. Since Aquinas claims that poverty (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. John D. Jones (1996). Philosophy of Technology. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 70:179-191.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. John D. Jones (1996). St. Thomas Aquinas and the Defense of Mendicant Poverty. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 70:179-191.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. John D. Jones (1995). The concept of poverty in St. Thomas Aquinas's Contra impugnantes Dei cultum et religionem. The Thomist 59 (3):409-439.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. John D. Jones (1994). Multiculturalism and Welfare Reform. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 1 (2):11-18.
    Multiculturalism has not yet systematically addressed, much less challenged, dominant approaches to poverty and welfare reform. This lacuna must be rectified since the widespread poverty experienced by people of color poses a substantive threat to the development of a truly inclusive and multicultural society. Present approaches to poverty, defined in the context of welfare reform, are defective for three reasons: First, welfare reform basically aims to reduce welfare “dependency” by moving so-called able-bodied welfare recipients off welfare and into the labor (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. John D. Jones (1994). Poverty and Subsistence. St. Thomas and the Definition of Poverty. Gregorianum 75 (1):135-149.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. John D. Jones (1986). Poverty as a Living Death. Philosophy Research Archives 12:557-575.
    I argue that stigmatization and inferiorization constitute the most destructive form of everyday poverty, the meaning of which is shown through a phenomenological interpretation of skid row. There are three parts to the paper. First, there is a brief discussion of poverty as a philosophical problem. Second, and ancillary to the analysis of skid row, there are discussions of the character of human dignity, everyday meaningful action and the psycho-social dynamics of stigmatization. Third, there is an analysis of skid row (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. John D. Jones (1983). Does Philosophy Console? Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 57:78-87.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. John D. Jones (1977). The Character of the Negative (Mystical) Theology for Pseudo-Dioynsius Areopagite. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 51:66-74.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation