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  1. John Deigh (2013). Ethics in the Analytic Tradition. In Roger Crisp (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the History of Ethics. Oxford University Press.
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  2. John Deigh (2013). Human Rights as Political Rights: A Critique. Journal of Social Philosophy 44 (1):22-42.
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  3. John Deigh (ed.) (2013). On Emotions: Philosophical Essays. Oup Usa.
    This volume brings together philosophical essays on emotions by eleven leading thinkers in the field. The essays cover a variety of topics that relate emotions to humor, opera, theater, justice, war, death, our intellectual life, authenticity, personal identity, self-knowledge, and science.
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  4. John Deigh (2012). Comments on Dixon, Scarantino, and Mulligan and Scherer. Emotion Review 4 (4):371-374.
    The three main articles in this symposium deal with different issues concerning the concept of emotion. I discuss each of these articles separately.
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  5. John Deigh (2012). Hobbess Philosophy in De Cive and Leviathan. Hobbes Studies 25 (2):199-208.
    This commentary on Bernard Gert’s Hobbes: Prince of Peace offers criticism of Gert’s assumption that the conceptual basis of the moral and political theory that Hobbes expounds in De Cive is the same as the conceptual basis of his moral and political theory in Leviathan.
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  6. John Deigh (2011). Empathy, Justice, and Jurisprudence. Southern Journal of Philosophy 49 (s1):73-90.
    This paper uses a study of the opinions in a case recently decided by the U.S. Supreme Court, Ledbetter v. Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., to explain the role of empathy in legal interpretation. I argue for two theses: (1) that empathy is essential to an interpretation of law if that interpretation is to serve the interests of justice and (2) that no interpretation of a law is sound if it ignores whether so interpreting the law serves the interests of (...)
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  7. John Deigh (2011). Responsibility. In John Deigh & David Dolinko (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of the Philosophy of the Criminal Law. Oxford University Press.
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  8. John Deigh (2011). Reactive Attitudes Revisited. In Carla Bagnoli (ed.), Morality and the Emotions. Oxford University Press.
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  9. John Deigh & David Dolinko (eds.) (2011). The Oxford Handbook of the Philosophy of the Criminal Law. Oxford University Press.
    This is the first comprehensive handbook in the philosophy of criminal law. It contains seventeen original essays by leading thinkers in the field and covers the field's major topics including limits to criminalization, obscenity and hate speech, blackmail, the law of rape, attempts, accomplice liability, causation, responsibility, justification and excuse, duress, provocation and self-defense, insanity, punishment, the death penalty, mercy, and preventive detention and other alternatives to punishment. It will be an invaluable resource for scholars and students whose research and (...)
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  10. John Deigh (2010). An Introduction to Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    This book examines the central questions of ethics through a study of theories of right and wrong that are found in the great ethical works of Western philosophy.
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  11. John Deigh (2010). Some Further Thoughts on Sidgwick's Epistemology. Utilitas 22 (1):78-89.
    This article is a reply to Anthony Skelton's . Professor Skelton, in his article, makes several objections to the account of Sidgwick's epistemology I presented in my earlier article . I answer these objections by further explaining my account.
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  12. John Deigh (2009). Concepts of Emotion in Modern Philosophy and Psychology. In Peter Goldie (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Emotion. Oup Oxford.
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  13. John Deigh (2008). Emotions, Values, and the Law. Oxford University Press.
    Emotions, Values, and the Law brings together ten of John Deigh's essays written over the past fifteen years. In the first five essays, Deigh ask questions about the nature of emotions and the relation of evaluative judgment to the intentionality of emotions, and critically examines the cognitivist theories of emotion that have dominated philosophy and psychology over the past thirty years. A central criticism of these theories is that they do not satisfactorily account for the emotions of babies or animals (...)
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  14. John Deigh (2007). Editorial. Ethics 118 (1):249-251.
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  15. John Deigh (2007). Introduction. Ethics 117 (4):593-594.
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  16. John Deigh (2007). Sidgwick's Epistemology. Utilitas 19 (4):435-446.
    This article concerns two themes in Bart Schultz's recent biography of Henry Sidgwick, Henry Sidgwick: Eye of the Universe. The first is the importance of Sidgwick's conflict over his religious beliefs to the development of his thinking in The Methods of Ethics. I suggest that, in addition to the characteristics of Methods that Schulz highlights, the work's epistemology, specifically, Sidgwick's program of presenting ethics as an axiomatic system on the traditional understanding of such systems, is due to the conflict. The (...)
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  17. John Deigh (2006). The Politics of Disgust and Shame. Journal of Ethics 10 (4):383 - 418.
    This is a critical study of Martha Nussbaum’s Hiding from Humanity. Central to Nussbaum’s book are arguments against society’s or the state’s using disgust and shame to forward the aims of the criminal law. Patrick Devlin’s appeal to the common man’s disgust to determine what acts of customary morality should be made criminal is an example of how society might use disgust to forward the aims of the criminal law. The use of so-called shaming penalties as alternative sanctions to imprisonment (...)
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  18. John Deigh (2005). Editorial. Ethics 116 (1):249-251.
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  19. John Deigh (2004). Nussbaum's Account of Compassion. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 68 (2):465–472.
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  20. John Deigh (2004). Primitive Emotions. In Robert C. Solomon (ed.), Thinking About Feeling: Contemporary Philosophers on Emotions. Oxford University Press.
     
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  21. John Deigh (2004). Sidgwick's Conception of Ethics. Utilitas 16 (2):168-183.
    J. B. Schneewind's Sidgwick's Ethics and Victorian Moral Philosophy surpassed all previous treatments of Sidgwick's The Methods of Ethics by showing how Sidgwick's work follows a coherent plan of argument for a conception of ethics as grounded in practical reason. Schneewind offered his interpretation as the product of a historical rather than a critical study. This article undertakes a critical study of Sidgwick's work based on Schneewind's interpretation. Its thesis is that the conception of ethics for which Sidgwick argued is (...)
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  22. John Deigh & Martha C. Nussbaum (2004). Review: Nussbaum's Account of Compassion. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 68 (2):465 - 472.
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  23. John Deigh (2003). Reply to Mark Murphy. Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (1):97-109.
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  24. John Deigh (2002). Editorial. Ethics 113 (1):1-4.
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  25. John Deigh (2002). Important Links. Ethics 113 (1):1-4.
     
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  26. John Deigh (2002). Promises Under Fire. Ethics 112 (3):483-506.
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  27. John Deigh (2002). Symposion on Ronald Dworkin's Sovereign Virtue. Ethics 113.
     
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  28. R. Jay Wallace, Gerald Dworkin, John Deigh, T. M. Scanlon, Peter Vallentyne & Alan Patten (2002). 10. William A. Edmundson, Ed., The Duty to Obey the Law: Selected Philosophical Readings William A. Edmundson, Ed., The Duty to Obey the Law: Selected Philosophical Readings (Pp. 614-616). [REVIEW] Ethics 112 (3).
     
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  29. R. Jay Wallace, Gerald Dworkin, John Deigh & Tm Scanlon (2002). TM Scanlon's What We Owe to Each Other. Ethics 112 (3):429-528.
     
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  30. John Deigh (2001). Editorial. Ethics 112 (1):1-5.
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  31. John Deigh (2001). The Moral Self. Pauline Chazan. Mind 110 (440):1069-1074.
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  32. John Deigh (2000). Editorial. Ethics 111 (1):1-4.
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  33. John Deigh, Robert E. Goodin David Parker, Louise M. Antony, Richard J. Arneson, Hilary Charlesworth, Richard Mulgan, Martha C. Nussbaum, Eamonn Callan, Lester H. Hunt & Fernando R. Teson (2000). 26. Book Notes Book Notes (Pp. 199-216). Ethics 111 (1).
     
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  34. John Deigh (1999). Editorial. Ethics 110 (1):1-4.
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  35. Alfred Mele Ginet, Mark Ravizza, Robert Kane, Michael McKenna & John Deigh (1999). Recent Work on Moral Responsibility* John Martin Fischer. Ethics 110 (1):93-139.
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  36. John Deigh (1998). Editorial. Ethics 108 (2):249-251.
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  37. John Deigh (1998). Valuing Emotions. Philosophical Review 107 (4):617-620.
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  38. John Deigh (1996). Reason and Ethics in Hobbes's. Journal of the History of Philosophy 34 (1).
  39. John Deigh (1996). Reason and Ethics in Hobbes's Leviathan. Journal of the History of Philosophy 34 (1):33-60.
  40. John Deigh (1996). The Sources of Moral Agency: Essays in Moral Psychology and Freudian Theory. Cambridge University Press.
    The essays in this collection are concerned with the psychology of moral agency. They focus on moral feelings and moral motivation, and seek to understand the operations and origins of these phenomena as rooted in the natural desires and emotions of human beings. An important feature of the essays, and one that distinguishes the book from most philosophical work in moral psychology, is the attention to the writings of Freud. Many of the essays draw on Freud's ideas about conscience and (...)
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  41. John Deigh (1995). Empathy and Universalizability. Ethics 105 (4):743-763.
    The paper examines the question of whether a person could know the difference between right and wrong and have the capacity to control his or her conduct yet not be moved by his or her knowledge of right or wrong. It proceeds by considering psychopathy and inquiring into the nature of the psychopath's cognitive deficits, if any. One possibility is that psychopaths are inconsistent in the sense of Kant's test of universalizability. This possibility is rejected after considerable argument. A second (...)
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  42. John Deigh (1994). Cognitivism in the Theory of Emotions. Ethics 104 (4):824-54.
  43. John Deigh (1994). Book Review:Equality and Partiality. Thomas Nagel. [REVIEW] Ethics 104 (3):633-.
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  44. John Deigh (ed.) (1992). Ethics and Personality: Essays in Moral Psychology. University of Chicago Press.
    This anthology focuses on emotions and motives that relate to our status as moral agents, our capacity for moral judgement, and the practices that help to define our social lives. Attachment, trust, respect, conscience, guilt, revenge, depravity, and forgiveness are among the topics discussed. Collectively, the thirteen essays in this collection represent a time-honored tradition in ethics: the effort to throw light on fundamental questions concerning the complexities of the human soul.
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  45. John Deigh (1992). Sidgwick on Ethical Judgment. In Bart Schultz (ed.), Essays on Henry Sidgwick. Cambridge University Press.
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  46. John Deigh (1991). Freud's Later Theory of Civilization: Changes and Implications. In J. Neu (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Freud. Cambridge Univ Pr. 287--308.
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  47. John Deigh (1991). Impartiality: A Closing Note. Ethics 101 (4):858-864.
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  48. John Deigh (1990). Review: A Cognitivist's Approach to the Emotions. [REVIEW] Behavior and Philosophy 18 (1):63 - 67.
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  49. John Deigh (1989). Human Rights and Population Control. Social Philosophy Today 2:42-50.
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  50. John Deigh (1988). On Rights and Responsibilities. Law and Philosophy 7 (2):147 - 178.
    Rights are commonly linked to responsibilities. One commonly hears remarks about the rights and responsibilities of teachers, parents, students, etc. This linking together of the two is the topic of this paper. The paper is divided into four sections. In the first section I distinguish three accounts of the relation between rights and esponsibilities any of which we could have in mind when linking the two together, and I single out the third account for further study. Unlike the other two, (...)
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