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Profile: John Dupre (University of Exeter)
  1. John Dupre (forthcoming). Normal People. Social Research.
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  2. Marshall Abrams, Andre Aiiew, Minus van Baalen, Domenico Benoloni Meli, Pietro Corsi, Francois Duchesneau, John Dupré, Paul Farber, Paul Griffiths & Jean Gayon (2013). History, Philosophy and Theory of the Life Sciences. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 54 (3):316-331.
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  3. Eric Bapteste & John Dupré (2013). Towards a Processual Microbial Ontology. Biology and Philosophy 28 (2):379-404.
    Standard microbial evolutionary ontology is organized according to a nested hierarchy of entities at various levels of biological organization. It typically detects and defines these entities in relation to the most stable aspects of evolutionary processes, by identifying lineages evolving by a process of vertical inheritance from an ancestral entity. However, recent advances in microbiology indicate that such an ontology has important limitations. The various dynamics detected within microbiological systems reveal that a focus on the most stable entities (or features (...)
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  4. John Dupré (2013). Elliott Sober Did Darwin Write the Origin Backwards? Philosophical Essays on Darwin's Theory. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 64 (4):axt010.
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  5. John Dupré (2013). Living Causes. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 87 (1):19-37.
    This paper considers the applicability of standard accounts of causation to living systems. In particular it examines critically the increasing tendency to equate causal explanation with the identification of a mechanism. A range of differences between living systems and paradigm mechanisms are identified and discussed. While in principle it might be possible to accommodate an account of mechanism to these features, the attempt to do so risks reducing the idea of a mechanism to vacuity. It is proposed that the solution (...)
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  6. John Dupré (2013). Science in a Democratic Society. By Philip Kitcher. (New York: Prometheus Books, 2011. Pp. 270. Price £24.95.). [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 63 (251):408-410.
  7. John Dupré (2012). A Fine Book, but Who's It For? Metascience 21 (1):175-177.
    A fine book, but who’s it for? Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-3 DOI 10.1007/s11016-011-9582-9 Authors John Dupré, ESRC Centre for Genomics in Society (Egenis), University of Exeter, Byrne House, St. German’s Road, Exeter, EX4 4PJ UK Journal Metascience Online ISSN 1467-9981 Print ISSN 0815-0796.
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  8. John Dupré (2012). Comments onPhilosophy of Science After Feminism, by Janet Kourany. Perspectives on Science 20 (3):310-319.
  9. John Dupré (2012). Processes of Life: Essays in the Philosophy of Biology. OUP Oxford.
    John Dupré explores recent revolutionary developments in biology and considers their relevance for our understanding of human nature and human society. Epigenetics and related areas of molecular biology have eroded the exceptional status of the gene and presented the genome as fully interactive with the rest of the cell. Developmental systems theory provides a space for a vision of evolution that takes full account of the fundamental importance of developmental processes. Dupré shows the importance of microbiology for a proper understanding (...)
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  10. John Dupré (2011). Emerging Sciences and New Conceptions of Disease; or, Beyond the Monogenomic Differentiated Cell Lineage. European Journal for Philosophy of Science 1 (1):119-131.
    This paper will begin with some very broad and general considerations about the kind of biological entities we are. This exercise is motivated by the belief that the view of what we—multicellular eukaryotic organisms—are that is widely assumed by biologists, medical scientists and the general public, is an extremely limited one. It cannot be assumed a priori that a more sophisticated view will make a major difference to the science or practice of medicine, and there are areas of medicine to (...)
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  11. John Dupre (2011). What Darwin Got Wrong by Jerry Fodor and Massimo Piatelli-Palmarini (UK: Profile; US: Farrar, Straus and Giroux)£ 20/$26 (Hb). [REVIEW] The Philosophers' Magazine 50:118-120.
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  12. John Dupré (2010). Developmental Systems Theory. The Philosophers' Magazine (50):38-39.
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  13. John Dupre (2010). How to Be Naturalistic Without Being Simplistic in the Study of Human Nature. In Mario de Caro & David Macarthur (eds.), Naturalism and Normativity. Columbia University Press.
     
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  14. John Dupré (2010). It is Not Possible to Reduce Biological Explanations to Explanations in Chemistry and/or Physics. In Francisco José Ayala & Robert Arp (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Philosophy of Biology. Wiley-Blackwell Pub..
  15. John Dupré (2010). The Human Genome, Human Evolution, and Gender. Constellations 17 (4):540-548.
  16. John Dupré (2010). What Fodor Got Wrong. The Philosophers' Magazine 50 (50):118-120.
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  17. Maureen A. O’Malley, William Martin & John Dupré (2010). The Tree of Life: Introduction to an Evolutionary Debate. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 25 (4):441-453.
    The ‘Tree of Life’ is intended to represent the pattern of evolutionary processes that result in bifurcating species lineages. Often justified in reference to Darwin’s discussions of trees, the Tree of Life has run up against numerous challenges especially in regard to prokaryote evolution. This special issue examines scientific, historical and philosophical aspects of debates about the Tree of Life, with the aim of turning these criticisms towards a reconstruction of prokaryote phylogeny and even some aspects of the standard evolutionary (...)
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  18. John Dupre (2009). Hard and Easy Questions About Consciousness. In P. M. S. Hacker, Hans-Johann Glock & John Hyman (eds.), Wittgenstein and Analytic Philosophy: Essays for P.M.S. Hacker. Oxford University Press.
  19. John Dupré & Maureen A. O'Malley (2009). Varieties of Living Things: Life at the Intersection of Lineage and Metabolism. Philosophy and Theory in Biology 1 (20130604).
  20. Alexander Powell & John Dupré (2009). From Molecules to Systems: The Importance of Looking Both Ways. Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 40 (1):54-64.
    Although molecular biology has meant different things at different times, the term is often associated with a tendency to view cellular causation as conforming to simple linear schemas in which macro-scale effects are specified by micro-scale structures. The early achievements of molecular biologists were important for the formation of such an outlook, one to which the discovery of recombinant DNA techniques, and a number of other findings, gave new life even after the complexity of genotype–phenotype
    relations had become apparent. Against this (...)
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  21. John Dupré (2008). Against Maladaptationism: Or What's Wrong with Evolutionary Psychology. In Massimo Mazzotti (ed.), Knowledge as Social Order: Rethinking the Sociology of Barry Barnes. Ashgate Pub Co. 165--180.
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  22. John Dupré & Maureen A. O'Malley (2007). Metagenomics and Biological Ontology. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 38 (4):834-846.
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  23. John Dupré & Maureen A. O’Malley (2007). Metagenomics and Biological Ontology. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 38 (4):834-846.
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  24. Harold Kincaid, John Dupré & Alison Wylie (eds.) (2007). Value-Free Science?: Ideals and Illusions. Oxford University Press.
    It has long been thought that science is our best hope for realizing objective knowledge, but that, to deliver on this promise, it must be value free. Things are not so simple, however, as recent work in science studies makes clear. The contributors to this volume investigate where and how values are involved in science, and examine the implications of this involvement for ideals of objectivity.
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  25. Maureen A. O'Malley & John Dupré (2007). Towards a Philosophy of Microbiology. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 38 (4):775-779.
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  26. Maureen O'Malley, Jane Calvert & John Dupré (2007). Response to Open Peer Commentaries on "The Study of Socioethical Issues in Systems Biology". American Journal of Bioethics 7 (4):7-9.
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  27. Maureen O'Malley, Jane Calvert & John Dupré (2007). The Study of Socioethical Issues in Systems Biology. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (4):67-78.
    Systems biology is the rapidly growing and heavily funded successor science to genomics. Its mission is to integrate extensive bodies of molecular data into a detailed mathematical understanding of all life processes, with an ultimate view to their prediction and control. Despite its high profile and widespread practice, there has so far been almost no bioethical attention paid to systems biology and its potential social consequences. We outline some of systems biology's most important socioethical issues by contrasting the concept of (...)
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  28. Maureen A. O’Malley & John Dupré (2007). Introduction: Towards a Philosophy of Microbiology. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C.
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  29. Maureen A. O’Malley & John Dupré (2007). Size Doesn't Matter: Towards a More Inclusive Philosophy of Biology. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 22 (2):155-191.
    Philosophers of biology, along with everyone else, generally perceive life to fall into two broad categories, the microbes and macrobes, and then pay most of their attention to the latter. ‘Macrobe’ is the word we propose for larger life forms, and we use it as part of an argument for microbial equality. We suggest that taking more notice of microbes – the dominant life form on the planet, both now and throughout evolutionary history – will transform some of the philosophy (...)
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  30. Alexander Powell, Maureen A. O'Malley, Staffan Mueller-Wille, Jane Calvert & John Dupré (2007). Disciplinary Baptisms: A Comparison of the Naming Stories of Genetics, Molecular Biology, Genomics and Systems Biology. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 29 (1):5-32.
    Understanding how scientific activities use naming stories to achieve disciplinary status is important not only for insight into the past, but for evaluating current claims that new disciplines are emerging. In order to gain a historical understanding of how new disciplines develop in relation to these baptismal narratives, we compare two recently formed disciplines, systems biology and genomics, with two earlier related life sciences, genetics and molecular biology. These four disciplines span the twentieth century, a period in which the processes (...)
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  31. Alexander Powell, Maureen A. O. Malley, Staffan Muller-Wille, Jane Calvert & John Dupré (2007). Disciplinary Baptisms: A Comparison of the Naming Stories of Genetics, Molecular Biology, Genomics, and Systems Biology. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 29 (1):5.
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  32. John Dupré (2006). Humans and Other Animals. Clarendon Press.
    John Dupré explores the ways in which we categorize animals, including humans, and comes to surprisingly radical conclusions. He opposes the idea that there is only one legitimate way of classifying things in the natural world, the 'scientific' way. The lesson we should learn from Darwin is to reject the idea that each organism has an essence that determines its necessary place in the unique hierarchy of things. Nature is not like that: it is not organized in a single system. (...)
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  33. John Dupré (2005). Are There Genes? Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 80 (56):16-.
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  34. John Dupré (2005). Darwin's Legacy: What Evolution Means Today. OUP Oxford.
    Charles Darwin transformed our understanding of the universe and our place in it with his development of the theory of evolution. 150 years later, we are still puzzling over the implications. John Dupré presents a lucid, witty introduction to evolution and what it means for our view of humanity, the natural world, and religion. He explains the right and the wrong ways to understand evolution: in the latter category fall most of the claims of evolutionary psychology, of which Dupré gives (...)
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  35. John Dupré (2005). You Must Have Thought This Book Was About You1: Reply to Daniel Dennett. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 70 (3):691–695.
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  36. Maureen A. O'Malley & John Dupré (2005). Fundamental Issues in Systems Biology. Bioessays 27 (12):1270-1276.
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  37. John Dupré (2004). ESRC Centre for Genomics in Society University of Exeter. Perspectives on Science 12 (3).
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  38. John Dupré (2004). Human Kinds and Biological Kinds: Some Similarities and Differences. Philosophy of Science 71 (5):892-900.
    This paper compares human diversity with biological diversity generally. Drawing on the pluralistic perspective on biological species defended in earlier work (2002, chs. 3 and 4), I argue that there are useful parallels to be drawn between human and animal kinds, as there are between their respective sources in cultural evolution and evolution generally. This view is developed in opposition to the insistence by sociobiologists and their successors on minimizing the significance of culture. The paper concludes with a discussion of (...)
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  39. John Dupre (2004). Review of Joseph LaPorte, Natural Kinds and Conceptual Change. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2004 (6).
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  40. John Dupré (2004). Science and Values and Values in Science: Comments on Philip Kitcher's Science, Truth, and Democracy. Inquiry 47 (5):505 – 514.
  41. John Dupré (2004). The Myth Gene. The Philosophers' Magazine 25 (25):58-58.
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  42. John Dupré (2004). The Miracle of Monism. In Mario De Caro & David Macarthur (eds.), Naturalism in Question. Harvard University Press. 36--58.
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  43. John Dupré (2004). Understanding Contemporary Genomics. Perspectives on Science 12 (3):320-338.
    : Recent molecular biology has seen the development of genomics as a successor to traditional genetics. This paper offers an overview of the structure, epistemology, and (very briefly) history of contemporary genomics. A particular focus is on the question to what extent the genome contains, or is composed of, anything that corresponds to traditional conceptions of genes. It is concluded that the only interpretation of genes that has much contemporary scientific relevance is what is described as the "developmental defect" gene (...)
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  44. John Dupre (2004). Understanding Contemporary Genomics. Perspectives on Science 12 (3):320-338.
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  45. John Dupré (2004). What's the Fuss About Social Constructivism. Episteme 1 (1):73-85.
  46. John Dupré & Stathis Psillos (2004). Aryeh Kosman is the John Whitehead Professor of Philosophy at Haver-Ford College in Haverford, Pennsylvania. He Works on the Interpretation of Ancient Philosophy, Particularly the Works of Plato and Aristotle. Zvi Biener is a Graduate Student at the University of Pittsburgh's Depart-Ment of History and Philosophy of Science. He Specializes in the History Of. [REVIEW] Perspectives on Science 12 (3).
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  47. John Dupré (2003). Reconciling Lion and Lamb? Metascience 12 (2):223-226.
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