Search results for 'John F. Claus' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. John F. Claus (1981). Radical Reform Within a Liberal and Democratic Framework? Rawls and the Radical Critique of Schooling. Educational Theory 31 (2):153-165.score: 870.0
  2. Claus Dierksmeier (2006). John Rawls on the Rights of Future Generations. In Tremmel J. (ed.), The Handbook of Intergenerational Justice. Edward Elgar. 72.score: 36.0
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  3. John Keane & David Held (1983). The Welfare State and the Future of Socialism: An Interview with Claus Offe. Telos 1983 (58):168-184.score: 36.0
    QUESTION: We would like to begin this discussion of the welfare state and the future of socialism by asking you about several substantive aspects of your work on the limitations of the welfare state. To begin with, why do you often say that late capitalist systems can neither live with nor without the welfare state? Do you consider this to be their fundamental contradiction?OFFE: A short-hand defintion of a contradiciton is that it is a condition in which certain indispensable elements (...)
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  4. John Schatzel & Claus Dierksmeier (2013). Teaching Business Ethics Through Social Audit Simulations. Journal of Business Ethics Education 10:305-326.score: 28.0
  5. John Duncan, Claus Bundesen, Andrew Olson, Glyn Humphreys, Swarup Chavda & Hitomi Shibuya (1999). Systematic Analysis of Deficits in Visual Attention. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 128 (4):450.score: 28.0
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  6. Lynsey Wolter (2010). Teaching & Learning Guide For: Demonstratives in Philosophy and Linguistics. Philosophy Compass 5 (1):108-111.score: 27.0
    Demonstrative noun phrases (e.g. this; that guy over there ) are intimately connected to the context of use in that their reference is determined by demonstrations and/or the speaker's intentions. The semantics of demonstratives therefore has important implications not only for theories of reference, but for questions about how information from the context interacts with formal semantics. First treated by Kaplan as directly referential , demonstratives have recently been analyzed as quantifiers by King, and the choice between these two approaches (...)
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  7. [deleted]Moritz de Greck, Annette F. Bölter, Lisa Lehmann, Cornelia Ulrich, Eva Stockum, Björn Enzi, Thilo Hoffmann, Claus Tempelmann, Manfred Beutel, Jörg Frommer & Georg Northoff (2013). Changes in Brain Activity of Somatoform Disorder Patients During Emotional Empathy After Multimodal Psychodynamic Psychotherapy. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    Somatoform disorder patients show a variety of emotional disturbances including impaired emotion recognition and increased empathic distress. In a previous paper, our group showed that several brain regions involved in emotional processing, such as the parahippocampal gyrus and other regions, were less activated in pre-treatment somatoform disorder patients (compared to healthy controls) during an empathy task. Since the parahippocampal gyrus is involved in emotional memory, its decreased activation might reflect the repression of emotional memories (which - according to psychoanalytical concepts (...)
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  8. Claus Beisbart & John D. Norton (2012). Why Monte Carlo Simulations Are Inferences and Not Experiments. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 26 (4):403-422.score: 24.0
    Monte Carlo simulations arrive at their results by introducing randomness, sometimes derived from a physical randomizing device. Nonetheless, we argue, they open no new epistemic channels beyond that already employed by traditional simulations: the inference by ordinary argumentation of conclusions from assumptions built into the simulations. We show that Monte Carlo simulations cannot produce knowledge other than by inference, and that they resemble other computer simulations in the manner in which they derive their conclusions. Simple examples of Monte Carlo simulations (...)
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  9. Anke Hammer, Bernadette Jansma, Claus Tempelmann & Thomas F. Münte (2011). Neural Mechanisms of Anaphoric Reference Revealed by fMRI. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 24.0
    Pronouns are bound to their antecedents by matching syntactic and semantic information. The aim of this functional magnetic resonance (fMRI) study was to localize syntactic and semantic information retrieval and integration during pronoun resolution. Especially we investigated their possible interaction with verbal working memory manipulated by distance between antecedent and pronoun. We disentangled biological and syntactic gender information using German sentences about persons (biological/syntactic gender) or things (syntactic gender) followed by congruent or incongruent pronouns. Increasing the distance between pronoun and (...)
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  10. Jean-Pierre Bourguignon, Erhard Busek, Norman Davies, Jared Diamond, Charles Dinarello, Michal Heller, Aleksander Koj, John Maynard Smith & Claus Offe (2001). Notes on the Authors. In A. Koj & Piotr Sztompka (eds.), Images of the World: Science, Humanities, Art. Jagiellonian University.score: 24.0
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  11. [deleted]Thomas F. Münte, Jörg Stadler, Claus Tempelmann & Gregor R. Szycik (2012). Examining the McGurk Illusion Using High-Field 7 Tesla Functional MRI. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6:95-95.score: 24.0
    In natural communication speech perception is profoundly influenced by observable mouth movements. The additional visual information can greatly facilitate intelligibility but incongruent visual information may also lead to novel percepts that neither match the auditory nor the visual information as evidenced by the McGurk effect. Recent models of AV speech perception accentuate the role of both speech motor areas and the integrative brain sites in the vicinity of the superior temporal sulcus (STS) for speech perception. In this event related 7 (...)
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  12. Friederike Moltmann (forthcoming). Intensional Relative Clauses and the Semantics of Variable Objects. In Manfred Krifka & Schenner Mathias (eds.), Reconstruction Effects in Relative Clauses. Akademie Verlag.score: 20.0
    NPs with intensional relative clauses such as 'the book John needs to write' pose a significant challenge for semantic theory. Such NPs act like referential terms, yet they do not stand for a particular actual object. This paper will develop a semantic analysis of such NPs on the basis of the notion of a variable object. The analysis avoids a range of difficulties that a more standard analysis based on the notion of an individual concept would face. Most importantly, (...)
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  13. Friederike Moltmann (2012). Tropes, Intensional Relative Clauses, and the Notion of a Variable Object. In Aloni Maria, Kimmelman Vadim, Weidman Sassoon Galit, Roloefson Floris, Schulz Katrin & Westera Matthjis (eds.), Proceedings of the 18th Amsterdam Colloquium 2011. Springer.score: 18.0
    NPs with intensional relative clauses such as 'the impact of the book John needs to write' pose a significant challenge for trope theory (the theory of particularized properties), since they seem to refer to tropes that lack an actual bearer. This paper proposes a novel semantic analysis of such NPs on the basis of the notion of a variable object. The analysis avoids a range of difficulties that an alternative analysis based on the notion of an individual concept would (...)
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  14. François Recanati (2004). ‘That’-Clauses as Existential Quantifiers. Analysis 64 (283):229–235.score: 18.0
    Following Panaccio, 'John believes that p' is analysed as 'For some x such that x is true if and only if p, John believes x'. On this view the complement clause 'that p' acts as a restricted existential quantifier ('For some x such that x is true if and only if p') and it contributes a higher-order property.
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  15. Herbert G. Bohnert (1967). Communication by Ramsey-Sentence Clause. Philosophy of Science 34 (4):341-347.score: 18.0
    F. P. Ramsey pointed out in Theories that the observational content of a theory expressed partly in non-observational terms is retained in the sentence resulting from existentially generalizing the conjunction of all sentences of the theory with respect to all nonobservational terms. Such terms are thus avoidable in principle, but only at the cost of forming a single "monolithic" sentence. This paper suggests that communication may be thought of as occurring not only by sentence but by clause, a sentential formula (...)
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  16. D. P. Flynn (2008). Pharmacist Conscience Clauses and Access to Oral Contraceptives. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (7):517-520.score: 18.0
    The introduction of conscience clauses after the 1973 US Supreme Court decision in Roe v. Wade allowed physicians and nurses to opt out of medical procedures, particularly abortions, to which they were morally opposed. In recent years pharmacists have requested the same consideration with regard to dispensing some medicines. This paper examines the pharmacists’ role and their professional and moral obligations to patients in the light of recent refusals by pharmacists to dispense oral contraceptives. A review of John Rawls’s (...)
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  17. Spence Green & Christopher D. Manning, NP Subject Detection in Verb-Initial Arabic Clauses.score: 18.0
    Phrase re-ordering is a well-known obstacle to robust machine translation for language pairs with significantly different word orderings. For Arabic-English, two languages that usually differ in the ordering of subject and verb, the subject and its modifiers must be accurately moved to produce a grammatical translation. This operation requires more than base phrase chunking and often defies current phrase-based statistical decoders. We present a conditional random field sequence classi- fier that detects the full scope of Arabic noun phrase subjects in (...)
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  18. Peer F. Bundgaard (2006). Principles of Linguistic Composition Below and Beyond the Clause: Elements of a Semantic Combinatorial System. Pragmatics and Cognition 14 (3):501-526.score: 14.0
    The present investigation challenges the traditional distinction between cohesion and coherence; i.e., the distinction between the syntactical rules governing the composition of lexical units within the scope of the clause and the semantic-pragmatic rules guiding the composition of text units beyond the scope of the clause. To this end it exposes two major principles of semantic combination that are active through all levels of linguistic composition: viz. frame-schematic structure and narrative structure. These principles are considered as being components of a (...)
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  19. John A. Taber (2004). Is Indian Logic Nonmonotonic? Philosophy East and West 54 (2):143-170.score: 12.0
    : Claus Oetke, in his "Ancient Indian Logic as a Theory of Non-monotonic Reasoning," presents a sweeping new interpretation of the early history of Indian logic. His main proposal is that Indian logic up until Dharmakirti was nonmonotonic in character-similar to some of the newer logics that have been explored in the field of Artificial Intelligence, such as default logic, which abandon deductive validity as a requirement for formally acceptable arguments; Dharmakirti, he suggests, was the first to consider that (...)
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  20. Donka F. Farkas & Yoko Sugioka (1983). Restrictive If/When Clauses. Linguistics and Philosophy 6 (2):225 - 258.score: 12.0
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  21. Brad Hinshelwood (2013). The Carolinian Context of John Locke's Theory of Slavery. Political Theory 41 (4):0090591713485446.score: 12.0
    The debate over Locke’s theory of slavery has focused on his involvement with the Royal African Company and other institutions of African slavery, as well as his rhetorical use of slavery in opposing absolutism. This overlooks Locke’s deep involvement with the Carolina colony, and in particular that colony’s Indian slave trade, which was largely justified in just-war terms. Evidence of Locke’s participation in the 1682 revisions to the Fundamental Constitutions of Carolina, which removed the infamous “absolute power and authority” clause, (...)
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  22. F. B. Tarbell (1891). The Deliberative Subjunctive in Relative Clauses in Greek. The Classical Review 5 (07):302-.score: 12.0
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  23. Jon Nissenbaum & Bernhard Schwarz (2011). Parasitic Degree Phrases. Natural Language Semantics 19 (1):1-38.score: 12.0
    This paper investigates gaps in degree phrases with too, as in John is too rich [for the monastery to hire ___ ]. We present two curious restrictions on such gapped degree phrases. First, the gaps must ordinarily be anteceded by the subject of the associated gradable adjective. Second, when embedded under intensional verbs, gapped degree phrases are ordinarily restricted to surface scope, unlike their counterparts without gaps. Just as puzzlingly, we show that these restrictions are lifted when there is (...)
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  24. A. C. Moorhouse & W. F. Bakker (1976). Pronomen Abundans and Pronomen Coniunctum: A Contribution to the History of the Resumptive Pronoun Within the Relative Clause in Greek. Journal of Hellenic Studies 96:203.score: 12.0
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  25. Claus Beisbart (2004). Richard Johns, A Theory of Physical Probability Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 24 (1):34-36.score: 12.0
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  26. Peter Sells, Case Assignment in the Clause on Adjuncts.score: 12.0
    It is well-known that the domain of case assignment extends beyond the arguments of a predicate to a range of adverbials in some languages, including Korean. In this paper we concentrate on case-marked Duration/Frequency adverbials which are characterized as ‘extensive measures’ by Wechsler and Lee (1996).∗ In some languages, case-marked adverbials are in the accusative and provide a boundedness to an event (cf. Kuryłowicz (1964), Kiparsky (1998), Kratzer (2004)). However, in Korean, the D/F adverbials can show accusative or nominative, with (...)
     
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  27. Berit Brogaard (2009). What Mary Did Yesterday: Reflections on Knowledge-Wh. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 78 (2):439 - 467.score: 8.0
    Reductionists about knowledge-wh hold that "s knows-wh" (e.g. "John knows who stole his car") is reducible to "there is a proposition p such that s knows that p, and p answers the indirect question of the wh-clause." Anti-reductionists hold that "s knows-wh" is reducible to "s knows that p, as the true answer to the indirect question of the wh-clause." I argue that both of these positions are defective. I then offer a new analysis of knowledge-wh as a special (...)
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  28. Leonard Kahn (2013). Rule Consequentialism and Disasters. Philosophical Studies 162 (2):219-236.score: 8.0
    Rule consequentialism (RC) is the view that it is right for A to do F in C if and only if A's doing F in C is in accordance with the the set of rules which, if accepted by all, would have consequences which are better than any alternative set of rules (i.e., the ideal code). I defend RC from two related objections. The first objection claims that RC requires obedience to the ideal code even if doing so has disastrous (...)
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  29. Tobias Hansson Wahlberg (2010). The Tenseless Copula in Temporal Predication. Erkenntnis 72 (2):267 - 280.score: 8.0
    In this paper I explore how the tenseless copula is to be interpreted in sentences of the form “ a is F at t ”, where “ a ” denotes a persisting, changeable object, “ F ” stands for a prima facie intrinsic property and “ t ” for a B-time. I argue that the interpretation of the copula depends on the logical role assigned to the time clause. Having rejected the idea that the time clause is to be treated (...)
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  30. Alessandro Capone (2008). Belief Reports and Pragmatic Intrusion: The Case of Null Appositives. Journal of Pragmatics 40:2019-2040.score: 8.0
    In this paper, I explore Bach’s idea (Bach, 2000) that null appositives, intended as expanded qua-clauses, can resolve the puzzles of belief reports. These puzzles are crucial in understanding the semantics and pragmatics of belief reports and are presented in a section. I propose that Bach’s strategy is not only a way of dealing with puzzles, but also an ideal way of dealing with belief reports. I argue that even simple unproblematic cases of belief reports are cases of pragmatic intrusion, (...)
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  31. Berit Brogaard (2008). Knowledge-the and Propositional Attitude Ascriptions. Grazer Philosophische Studien 77 (1):147-190.score: 8.0
    Determiner phrases embedded under a propositional attitude verb have traditionally been taken to denote answers to implicit questions. For example, 'the capital of Vermont' as it occurs in 'John knows the capital of Vermont' has been thought to denote the proposition which answers the implicit question 'what is the capital of Vermont?' Thus, where 'know' is treated as a propositional attitude verb rather than an acquaintance verb, 'John knows the capital of Vermont' is true iff John knows (...)
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  32. Friederike Moltmann, Attitude Reports, Events, and Partial Models.score: 8.0
    Clausal complements of different kinds of attitude verbs such as believe, doubt, be surprised, wonder, say, and whisper behave differently semantically in a number of respects. For example, they differ in the inference patterns they display. This paper develops a semantic account of clausal complements using partial logic which accounts for such semantic differences on the basis of a uniform meaning of clauses. It focuses on explaining the heterogeneous inference patterns associated with different kinds of attitude verbs, but it contributes (...)
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  33. Robert Bass (2007). Omniscience and the Identification Problem. Florida Philosophical Review 7 (1):78-91.score: 8.0
    I discuss the propositional knowledge of an omniscient being, knowledge of facts that can be represented by that-clauses in sentences such as ‘John knows that the world is round.’ I shall focus upon questions about a supposedly omniscient being who propositionally knows the truth about all current states of affairs. I shall argue that there is no such being.
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  34. David Braun (2013). Contextualism About 'Might' and Says-That Ascriptions. Philosophical Studies 164 (2):485-511.score: 8.0
    Contextualism about ‘might’ says that the property that ‘might’ expresses varies from context to context. I argue against contextualism. I focus on problems that contextualism apparently has with attitude ascriptions in which ‘might’ appears in an embedded ‘that’-clause. I argue that contextualists can deal rather easily with many of these problems, but I also argue that serious difficulties remain with collective and quantified says-that ascriptions. Herman Cappelen and John Hawthorne atempt to deal with these remaining problems, but I argue (...)
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  35. Lynne Rudder Baker (1990). Seeming to See Red. Philosophical Studies 58 (1-2):121-128.score: 8.0
    In "Understanding the Language of Thought," John Pollock offers a semantics for Mentalese. Along the way, he raises many deep issues concerning, among other things, the indexicality of thought, the relations between thought and communication, the function of 'that'-clauses and the nature of introspection. Regrettably, I must pass over these issues here. Instead, I shall focus on Pollock's views on the nature of appearance and its role in interpreting the language of thought.' I shall examine two aspects of Pollock's (...)
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  36. Paul A. Rahe (2005). The Political Needs of a Toolmaking Animal: Madison, Hamilton, Locke, and the Question of Property. Social Philosophy and Policy 22 (1):1-26.score: 8.0
    When Benjamin Franklin suggested that man is by nature a tool-making animal, he summed up what was for his fellow Americans the common sense of the matter. It is not, then, surprising that, when Britain's colonists in North America broke with the mother country over the issue of an unrepresentative parliament's right to tax and govern the colonies, they defended their right to the property they owned on the ground that it was in a most thorough-going sense an extension of (...)
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  37. Eike von Savigny (1992). I Don't Know What I Want. Grazer Philosophische Studien 42:193-209.score: 8.0
    In the Philosophical Investigations and later writings, Wittenstein views "I know" utterances which embed egocentric psychological clauses as affirming contextually defined authority positions rather than as knowledge claims. This view is consistent with Brian McGuinness's analysis of conscious wants in terms of their subjects. A's knowledge of mental facts about B is a capacity (Gilbert Ryle, John Watling) which is responsible for A's being prepared for B's behaviour (as accounted for by those mental facts); for one and the same (...)
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  38. Scott Anderbois, Adrian Brasoveanu & Robert Henderson (2013). At-Issue Proposals and Appositive Impositions in Discourse. Journal of Semantics:fft014.score: 8.0
    Potts (2005) and many subsequent works have argued that the semantic content of appositive (non-restrictive) relative clauses, e.g., the underlined material in John, who nearly killed a woman with his car, visited her in the hospital, must be in some way separate from the content of the rest of the sentence, i.e., from at-issue content. At the same time, there is mounting evidence from various anaphoric processes that the two kinds of content must be integrated into a single, incrementally (...)
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  39. Clark Glymour, Editorial.score: 8.0
    The use of ceteris paribus clauses in philosophy and in the sciences has a long and fascinating history. Persky (1990) traces the use by economists of ceteris paribus clauses in qualifying generalizations as far back as William Petty’s Treatise of Taxes and Contributions (1662). John Cairnes’ The Character and Logical Method of Political Economy (1857) is credited with enunciating the idea that the conclusions of economic investigations hold “only in the absence of disturbing causes”.1 His Leading Principles (1874) contains (...)
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  40. Alan Clinton Bale (2011). Scales and Comparison Classes. Natural Language Semantics 19 (2):169-190.score: 8.0
    This paper discusses comparison classes—sets that relativize the interpretation of gradable adjectives, often specified with for-clauses as in John is smart for a linguist. Such a discussion ultimately lends support to the thesis that scales, degrees, measure functions, and linear orders are grammatically derived from more basic relations between individuals. Three accounts of comparison classes are compared and evaluated. The first proposes that such classes serve as an argument to a function that determines a standard of comparison. The second (...)
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  41. Y. Greenberg (2008). Presupposition Accommodation and Informativity Considerations with Aspectual Still. Journal of Semantics 26 (1):49-86.score: 8.0
    This paper deals with a newly observed phenomenon which lies at the interface of the semantics and pragmatics of aspectual still (as in John is still asleep), namely the fact that still is infelicitous when it appears in past tense sentences whose reference time is not specified by some temporal adverbial or the utterance context. The main claim of the paper is that in such sentences, the truth of the assertion and that of the ‘prior time’ presupposition this particle (...)
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  42. Bob Rigter (1982). Intensional Domains and the Use of Tense, Perfect and Modals in English. Journal of Semantics 1 (2):95-145.score: 8.0
    A theory for the use of tense and perfect in English should do three things: 1. It should provide rules defining the phrase markers in which tense and perfect can occur; 2. It should specify what extralinguistic phenomena correlate with the occurrence of tense and perfect in the structures that underlie English sentences; 3. It should provide rules which are sensitive to these extralinguistic phenomena, and which place either +PAST or −PAST under tense nodes and either HAVE or f) under (...)
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  43. James Somerville (2006). ‘The Table, Which We See’: An Irresolvable Ambiguity. Philosophy 81 (1):33-63.score: 8.0
    The argument presented on behalf of ‘the slightest philosophy’ by Hume that ‘The table, which we see, seems to diminish, as we remove farther from it: But the real table, which exists independent of us, suffers no alteration’, in contrasting the seen with the real table requires the first relative clause to be defining; but the possibility of identifying tables independently of being seen requires the clause to be non-defining. John P. Wright's objection to Reid's rejoinder is rebutted. A (...)
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  44. Manfred Bierwisch (1988). Tools and Explanations of Comparison - Part. Journal of Semantics 6 (1):101-146.score: 8.0
    In this paper, I will outline a theory of gradation1 that builds upon quite a number of previous analyses, preserving as far as possible the concepts that have already been clarified, but modifying the structure of earlier proposals in crucial respects. The reason for adding a new theory to the ones already existing is twofold: (a) The new theory accounts for a number of relevant facts that have systematically been ignored by earlier analyses.(b) It relates these facts to those already (...)
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  45. Richard Larson & Sungeun Cho (2003). Temporal Adjectives and the Structure of Possessive DPs. Natural Language Semantics 11 (3):217-247.score: 8.0
    The presence of temporal adjectives in possessive nominals like John's former car creates two interpretations. On one reading, the temporal adjective modifies the common noun (N-modifying reading). On the other, it modifies the possession relation (POSS-modifying reading). An explanation for this behavior is offered that appeals to what occurs in possessive sentences like John has a former car (N-modifying reading) and John formerly had a car (POSS-modifying reading). In the sentential cases, the source of two readings is (...)
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  46. Christopher Manning, Presents Embedded Under Pasts.score: 8.0
    In this paper I will discuss a rather recondite phenomenon in the area of sequence of tense (SOT), exhibited by sentences like (1): (1) John said that Mary is pregnant. According to traditional grammar, this is a sentence where sequence of tense has failed to apply (i.e., concord has been broken): standard sequence of tense rules would dictate use of a past tense when embedding an event contemporaneous to the embedding verb under a past tense verb, giving the sentence (...)
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  47. Maribel Romero (2013). Modal Superlatives: A Compositional Analysis. [REVIEW] Natural Language Semantics 21 (1):79-110.score: 8.0
    Superlative adjectives accompanied by certain modal adjectives like possible (e.g. John bought the largest possible present) are ambiguous between a reading where possible is a regular noun modifier and a reading paraphrasable as ‘as Adj as possible’, called ‘modal superlative reading’. Three interesting restrictions have been observed in the literature. First, possible and some other adjectives ending in -able, but not potential and probable, support the latter reading. Second, when the modal adjective appears postnominally, only the modal superlative reading (...)
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  48. P. Blackburn, A. Bochman, T. Clausing, P. Dekker, J. Engelfriet, D. M. Gabbay, F. Giunchiglia, J. M. Goñimenoyo, G. Jäger & T. M. V. Janssen (2002). Index of Authors of Volume 11. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 11 (519):519.score: 8.0
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  49. Chris Barker (2013). Scopability and Sluicing. Linguistics and Philosophy 36 (3):187-223.score: 8.0
    This paper analyzes sluicing as anaphora to an anti-constituent (a continuation), that is, to the semantic remnant of a clause from which a subconstituent has been removed. For instance, in Mary said that [John saw someone yesterday], but she didn’t say who, the antecedent clause is John saw someone yesterday, the subconstituent targeted for removal is someone, and the ellipsis site following who is anaphoric to the scope remnant John saw ___ yesterday. I provide a compositional syntax (...)
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