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  1. John Ferejohn (2013). Two Views of the City: Republicanism and Law. In Andreas Niederberger & Philipp Schink (eds.), Republican Democracy: Liberty, Law and Politics. Edinburgh University Press.
     
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  2. John Ferejohn (2008). Commentary: Tolerant Institutions. In Russel Hardin, Ingrid Crepell & Stephen Macedo (eds.), Toleration on Trial. Lexington Books. 73.
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  3. John Ferejohn (2007). Conversability and Deliberation. In Michael Smith, Robert Goodin & Geoffrey Geoffrey (eds.), Common Minds. Oxford. 121.
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  4. John Ferejohn (2002). Symposium on Explanations and Social Ontology 1: Rational Choice Theory and Social Explanation. Economics and Philosophy 18 (2):211-234.
    In the Common Mind, Pettit argues that rational choice theory cannot provide genuine causal accounts of action. A genuine causal explanation of intentional action must track how people actually deliberate to arrive at action. And, deliberation is necessarily enculturated or situated “. . . we take human agents to reason their way to action, using the concepts that are available to them in the currency of their culture” (p. 220). When deciding how to act, “. . . people find their (...)
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  5. John Ferejohn (2001). Pettit's Republic. The Monist 84 (1):77-97.
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  6. John Ferejohn & Debra Satz (1995). Unification, Universalism, and Rational Choice Theory. Critical Review 9 (1-2):71-84.
    Green and Shapiro's critique of rational choice theory underestimates the value of unification and the necessity of universalism in science. The central place of intentionality in social life makes both unification and universalism feasible norms in social science. However, ?universalism? in social science may be partial, in that the independence hypothesis?that the causal mechanism governing action is context independent?may hold only locally in certain classes of choice domains.
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  7. Debra Satz & John Ferejohn (1994). Rational Choice and Social Theory. Journal of Philosophy 91 (2):71-87.
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  8. Jules L. Coleman & John Ferejohn (1986). Democracy and Social Choice. Ethics 97 (1):6-25.
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