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John Finnis [56]John M. Finnis [4]
  1. John Finnis, Natural Law Theories. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  2. John Finnis, Anscombe's Essays.
    This review article, now published in the National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly, Spring 2009, focuses on several themes in the two volumes, posthumously selected, edited and published by a daughter and son-in-law, of G.E.M. Anscombe’s philosophical and philosophical/theological essays. Of first importance is her philosophical explication and defence of the spirituality of human life, as manifested in even the simplest act such as pointing to something as an example of colour rather than of shape. With that is connected her defence of (...)
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  3. John Finnis, On 'Public Reason'.
    'Public reason' in Rawls's stipulated usage signifies propositions that can legitimately be used in deliberating on and deciding fundamental issues of political life and legislation because they are propositions which all citizens may reasonably be expected to endorse: their use is therefore fair (respects the moral principle of reciprocity) and preserves the public peace which is at risk from contests between comprehensive doctrines, contests exemplified by wars of religion. This attractive set of suggestions is ruined by irresoluable ambiguities, truncation of (...)
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  4. Josef Seifert & John Finnis (2014). Christian Philosophy and Free Will. St. Augustines Press.
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  5. John Finnis (2013). Capacity, Harm and Experience in the Life of Persons as Equals. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (5):281-283.
    This paper identifies and contests the thesis it takes to be the central premise of Giubilini and Minerva, ‘Why should the baby live?’, namely that rights, subjecthood and personhood have as a necessary condition that the undergoing of a harm be experienced. That thesis entails the repugnant or absurd conclusion that we do not have the right not to be killed in our sleep. The conclusion can be avoided by adding some premise or qualification about actual capacities for experience of (...)
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  6. John Finnis (2013). Intention and Identity: Collected Essays Volume Ii. Oup Oxford.
    Intention and Identity presents John Finnis's accounts of personal existence; group identity and common good; and the moral significance of personal intention. Joining conceptual analysis with ethical problems surrounding the beginning and end of life, the papers show the power of a neglected aspect of Finnis's natural law theory.
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  7. John Finnis (2013). Religion and Public Reasons: Collected Essays Volume V. Oup Oxford.
    Religion and Public Reasons collects the theological work of John Finnis, spanning his contribution to such foundational issues as the justification for belief in revelation and moral-theological methodology; to the role of religion in public reason and law; and to major controversies within Catholic thought and practice since the 1960s.
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  8. John Finnis (2013). Reflections and Responses. In John Keown & Robert P. George (eds.), Reason, Morality, and Law: The Philosophy of John Finnis. Oxford University Press. 459.
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  9. John Finnis (2013). Reason in Action: Collected Essays Volume I. Oup Oxford.
    Reason in Action collects John Finnis's work on practical reason and moral philosophy. Ranging from foundational issues of meta-ethics to modern ethical debates, the essays trace the emergence and development of his new classical theory of natural law through close engagement with a broad range of contemporary thinkers and problems.
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  10. John Finnis (2013). The Priority of Persons Revisited. American Journal of Jurisprudence 58 (1):45-62.
    This essay, in the context of a conference on justice, reviews and reaffirms the main theses of “The Priority of Persons” (2000), and supplements them with the benefit of hindsight in six theses. The wrongness of Roe v. Wade goes wider than was indicated. The secularist scientistic or naturalist dimension of the reigning contemporary ideology is inconsistent with the spiritual reality manifested in every word or gesture of its proponents. The temporal continuity of the existence of human persons and their (...)
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  11. John Finnis & Elizabeth Anscombe (2013). Intention and Side Effects. In John Keown & Robert P. George (eds.), Reason, Morality, and Law: The Philosophy of John Finnis. Oxford University Press. 93.
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  12. John Finnis (2012). Its Past and Its Present. In Marmor Andrei (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Law. Routledge.
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  13. John Finnis (2012). Natural Law Theory: Its Past and its Present. American Journal of Jurisprudence 57 (1):81-101.
    The past in which theory of this kind had its origins is notably similar to the present. For this is theory–practical theory–which articulates a critique of critiques, and the critiques it criticizes, rejects and replaces have much in common whether one looks at them in their fifth century B.C. Hellenic (Sophistic) or their modern (Enlightenment, Nietzschean or postmodern) forms.
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  14. John Finnis (2011). Human Rights and Common Good: Collected Essays Volume III. OUP Oxford.
    This central volume in the Collected Essays brings together John Finnis's wide-ranging contribution to fundamental issues in political philosophy. -/- The volume begins by examining the general theory of political community and social justice. It includes the powerful and well-known Maccabaean Lecture on Bills of Rights -- a searching critique of Ronald Dworkin's moral-political arguments and conclusions, of the European Court of Human Rights' approach to fundamental rights, and of judicial review as a constitutional institution. It is followed by an (...)
     
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  15. John Finnis (2011). Intention and Identity. Oxford University Press.
    The essays in Intention and Identity explore themes in Finnis's work touched on only lightly, if at all, in Natural Law and Natural Rights, developing profound ...
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  16. John Finnis (2011). Law as Idea, Ideal and Duty. Jurisprudence 1 (2):245-251.
    Law centrally or archetypically is a moral idea, but not so much an ideal as a requirement of justice. Studying it contemplatively, as Simmonds's admirable Law as a Moral Idea does, tends to truncate the investigation of law's moral character and to obscure the extent to which jurisprudence can and should be a critical moral inquiry. The book's virtues—especially its critiques of Hart, Raz and Kramer—outweigh these two objections and the further, lesser objection that the distinctions it draws between its (...)
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  17. John Finnis (2011). Philosophy of Law. Oxford University Press.
    This volume of his Collected Essays shows the full range and power of his contributions to the philosophy of law.
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  18. John Finnis (2011). Philosophy of Law: Collected Essays Volume Iv. Oup Oxford.
    John Finnis has been a central figure in the development of legal philosophy over the past half-century. This volume of his Collected Essays shows the full range and power of his contributions to core problems in the philosophy of law: the foundations of law's authority; legal reasoning; constitutional theory; and the logic of law-making.
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  19. John Finnis (2011). Religion and Public Reasons. Oxford University Press.
    The essays in Religion and Public Reasons seek to argue for, and illustrate, a central element of John Finnis' theory of natural law: that the main tenets of ...
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  20. John Finnis (2011). Reason in Action. Oxford University Press.
    The essays in the volume range from foundational issues of meta-ethics to the practical application of natural law theory to ethical problems such as nuclear ...
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  21. John Finnis (2011). The Collected Essays of John Finnis: Volumes I-V. OUP Oxford.
    For over forty years John Finnis has pioneered the development of a new classical theory of natural law, a systematic philosophical explanation of human life that offers an integrated account of personal identity, practical reason, morality, political community, and law. The core of Finnis' theory, articulated in his seminal work Natural Law and Natural Rights, has profoundly influenced later work in the philosophy of law and practical reason, while his contributions to the ethical debates surrounding nuclear deterrence, abortion, and sexual (...)
     
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  22. John M. Finnis (2011). H.L.A. Hart : A Twentieth-Century Oxford Political Philosopher. In Catherine H. Zuckert (ed.), Political Philosophy in the Twentieth Century: Authors and Arguments. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  23. John Finnis (2009). Reflections by a Former Student and Colleague HLA Hart: A Twentieth-Century Oxford Political Philosopher. American Journal of Jurisprudence, The 54:161.
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  24. John Finnis, Aquinas' Moral, Political, and Legal Philosophy. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  25. John Finnis (2008). Marriage. The Monist 91 (3/4):388-406.
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  26. John Finnis (2008). On Hart's Ways : Law as Reason and as Fact. In Matthew H. Kramer (ed.), The Legacy of H.L.A. Hart: Legal, Political, and Moral Philosophy. Oxford University Press. 25-53.
    This address at the Hart Centenary Conference in Cambridge in July 2007 reflects on foundational elements in Hart's method in legal philosophy. It argues that his understanding of what it is to adopt an internal point of view was flawed by (a) inattention to the difference between descriptive history (or biography or detection) and descriptive general theory of human affairs, (b) inattention to practical reason as argument from premises, some factual but others normative (evaluative) in their content, and (c) relative (...)
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  27. John Finnis (2008). Reason, Revelation, Universality and Particularity in Ethics. American Journal of Jurisprudence 53 (1):23-48.
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  28. David Benatar, Cheshire Calhoun, Louise Collins, John Corvino, Yolanda Estes, John Finnis, Deirdre Golash, Alan Goldman, Greta Christina, Raja Halwani, Christopher Hamilton, Eva Feder Kittay, Howard Klepper, Andrew Koppelman, Stanley Kurtz, Thomas Mappes, Joan Mason-Grant, Janice Moulton, Thomas Nagel, Jerome Neu, Martha Nussbaum, Alan Soble, Sallie Tisdale, Alan Wertheimer, Robin West & Karol Wojtyla (2007). Philosophy of Sex: Contemporary Readings. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  29. John Finnis (2007). Grounds of Law and Legal Theory: A Response. Legal Theory 13 (3-4):315-344.
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  30. John Finnis (2007). The Ethics of War and Peace in the Catholic Natural Law Tradition. In John Aloysius Coleman (ed.), Christian Political Ethics. Princeton University Press.
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  31. John Finnis (2005). “The Thing I Am”: Personal Identity in Aquinas and Shakespeare. Social Philosophy and Policy 22 (2):250-282.
    The four kinds of explanation identified by Aquinas at the beginning of his commentary on Aristotle's Ethics are deployed to show that the identity of the human person is sui generis and mysterious, even though each of its elements is more or less readily accessible to our understanding. The essay attends particularly to the explorations by Aquinas and, with different techniques, by Shakespeare of the experience and understanding of (a) one's lasting presence to oneself as one and the same bodily (...)
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  32. John Finnis (2004). Natural Law: The Classical Tradition. In Jules Coleman & Scott Shapiro (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Jurisprudence and Philosophy of Law. Oup Oxford.
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  33. John Finnis (2004). Self-Referential (or Performative) Inconsistency. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 78:13-22.
    Augustine was undeniably a dogmatic thinker, but he also had an “aporetic side” which makes him more relevant to Christian philosophers today than isgenerally recognized. Augustine’s first experience of reading philosophy came from Cicero’s Hortensius, from which Augustine gained an appreciation for philosophical scepticism which he never lost. Thus, in all of his works and in all periods of his life, Augustine’s characteristic way of doing philosophy is aporetic, rather than either systematic or speculative. Paradoxically, Augustine’s faith in the truth (...)
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  34. John Finnis (2003). Law and What I Truly Should Decide. American Journal of Jurisprudence 48 (1):107-129.
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  35. John Finnis (2002). Natural Law: The Classical Theory. In Jules Coleman & Scott J. Shapiro (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Jurisprudence and Philosophy of Law. Oup Oxford.
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  36. John Finnis (2001). Is Natural Law Theory Compatible with Limited Government? In Robert George (ed.), Natural Law, Liberalism, and Morality: Contemporary Essays. Oup Oxford.
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  37. John Finnis & Alberto Cevolini (2001). Contenuto e intenzione nei giudizi morali secondo Tommaso d'Aquino: Metafisica e azione: Nuovi approcci al tomismo. Divus Thomas 104 (2):15-42.
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  38. John Finnis, Germain Grisez & Joseph Boyle (2001). «Direct» and «Indirect»: A Reply to Critics of Our Action Theory. The Thomist 65 (1):1-44.
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  39. John Finnis (2000). Christian Witness. In Christopher Robert Kaczor (ed.), Proportionalism: For and Against. Marquette University Press.
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  40. John Finnis (1999). Natural Law and the Ethics of Discourse. Ratio Juris 12 (4):354-373.
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  41. John Finnis, On the Practical Meaning of Secularism.
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  42. John Finnis (1998). Aquinas: Moral, Political, and Legal Theory. OUP Oxford.
    Founders of Modern Political and Social Thought -/- Series Editor: Dr Mark Philp, Oriel College, University of Oxford -/- Founders of Modern Political and Social Thought present critical examinations of the work of major political philosophers and social theorists, assessing both their initial contribution and continuing relevance to politics and society. Each volume provides a clear, accessible, historically-informed account of each thinker's work, focusing on a re-assessment of their central ideas and arguments. Founders encourage scholars and students to link their (...)
     
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  43. John Finnis (1995). Intention in Tort Law. In David G. Owen (ed.), Philosophical Foundations of Tort Law. Oxford University Press. 229--47.
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  44. John Finnis (1994). Beyond the Encyclical. In John Wilkins (ed.), Considering Veritatis Splendor. Pilgrim Press. 75.
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  45. John Finnis (1994). The Basic Values. In Peter Singer (ed.), Ethics. Oxford University Press. 229--235.
     
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  46. John Finnis (ed.) (1991). Natural Law. New York University Press, Reference Collection.
    This Major Reference series brings together a wide range of key international articles in law and legal theory. Many of these essays are not readily accessible, and their presentation in these volumes will provide a vital new resource for both research and teaching. Each volume is edited by leading international authorities who explain the significance and context of articles in an informative and complete introduction.
     
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  47. John Finnis (1991). Object and Intention in Moral Judgments According to Aquinas. The Thomist 55 (1):1-27.
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  48. John Finnis (1990). Incoherence and Consequentialism (or Proportionalism). American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 64 (2):271-277.
  49. John M. Finnis (1989). Law as Co-Ordination. Ratio Juris 2 (1):97-104.
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  50. Roger Scruton & John Finnis (1989). Corporate Persons. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 63:239 - 274.
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