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  1. John Forge (2013). Weapons Research and Development. In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  2. John Forge (2011). Review of Janet A. Kourany, Philosophy of Science After Feminism. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2011 (2).
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  3. John Forge (2010). A Note on the Definition of “Dual Use”. Science and Engineering Ethics 16 (1):111-118.
    While there has been much interest in this topic, no generally accepted definition of dual use has been forthcoming. As a contribution to this issue, it is maintained that three related kinds of things comprise the category of dual use: research, technologies and artefacts. In regard to all three kinds, difficulties are identified in making clear distinctions between those that are and are not dual use. It is suggested that our classification should take account of actual capacities and willingness to (...)
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  4. Bernard Gert, Nicholas Evans, Heather Douglas & John Forge (2010). With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility. Metascience 19 (1):29-43.
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  5. John Forge (2009). Mechanics and Moral Mediation. Metascience 18 (3):399-403.
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  6. John Forge (2009). Proportionality, Just War Theory and Weapons Innovation. Science and Engineering Ethics 15 (1):25-38.
    Just wars are supposed to be proportional responses to aggression: the costs of war must not greatly exceed the benefits. This proportionality principle raises a corresponding ‘interpretation problem’: what are the costs and benefits of war, how are they to be determined, and a ‘measurement problem’: how are costs and benefits to be balanced? And it raises a problem about scope: how far into the future do the states of affairs to be measured stretch? It is argued here that weapons (...)
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  7. John Forge (2009). Science is Value-Laden: You Can Count on That! [REVIEW] Metascience 18 (2):257-260.
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  8. John Forge (2007). Aiding and Abetting the Continuation of Political Intercourse. Metascience 16 (2):327-330.
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  9. John Forge (2007). No Consolation for Kalashnikov. Philosophy Now 59:6-8.
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  10. John Forge (2007). What Are the Moral Limits of Weapons Research? Philosophy in the Contemporary World 14 (1):76-87.
    The paper tries to locate the moral limits of weapons research, an issue that comes about because weapons harm and unjustified harms are wrong.Doing research does not itself harm, so first it is shown that a means principle holds. Weapons research then needs to be justified, and two ways to do this arecanvassed, historical and a historical. The former takes account of the context in which the work is done and the circumstances the products used. It is arguedthat there can (...)
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  11. John Forge (2004). The Morality of Weapons Research. Science and Engineering Ethics 10 (3):531-542.
    I ask whether weapons research is ever justified. Weapons research is identified as the business of the engineer. It is argued that the engineer has responsibility for the uses to which the tools that he designs can be put, and that responsibility extends to the use of weapons. It is maintained that there are no inherently defensive weapons, and hence there is no such thing as ‘defensive’ weapons research. The issue then is what responsibilities as a professional the engineer has (...)
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  12. John Forge (2003). Sharp and Blunt Values. Science and Education 12 (5):479-493.
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  13. John Forge (2003). Science in a Democratic Society. Metascience 12 (2):217-219.
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  14. John Forge (2002). Corporate Responsibility Revisited. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 16 (1):13-32.
    The fact that corporate responsibility supervenes on human action implies that there are two possible kinds of account of the former, namely reductive accounts in which the responsibility of the corporation devolves down without remainder to its officers, and those in which it does not. Two versions of the latter are discussed here. The first, due to Peter French, tries to satisfy the supervenience requirement by defining corporate action in terms of human action. It is argued that the corresponding view (...)
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  15. John Forge (2002). Reflections on Structuralism and Scientific Explanation. Synthese 130 (1):109 - 121.
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  16. John Forge (2000). Moral Responsibility and the 'Ignorant Scientist'. Science and Engineering Ethics 6 (3):341-349.
    The question whether a scientist can be responsible for an outcome of her work which she does not foresee, and so is ignorant of, is addressed. It is argued that ignorance can be a ground for the attribution of responsibility, on condition that there are general principles, rules or norms, that the subject should be aware of. It is maintained that there are such rules which inform the practice of science as a social institution.
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  17. John Forge (2000). Quantities in Quantum Mechanics. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 14 (1):43 – 56.
    The problem of the failure of value definiteness (VD) for the idea of quantity in quantum mechanics is stated, and what VD is and how it fails is explained. An account of quantity, called BP, is outlined and used as a basis for discussing the problem. Several proposals are canvassed in view of, respectively, Forrest's indeterminate particle speculation, the "standard" interpretation of quantum mechanics and Bub's modal interpretation.
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  18. John Forge (2000). Science and the 'Modern Values of Control'. Metascience 9 (3):326-333.
    This is a challenging book and it addresses important questions. This review has focused on what I think is the most important question of all: just what is the relationship between the ‘strategies’ which drive modern science and the social values which guide the societies we live in. I have much sympathy with the way in which Lacey tries to answer this question and how he tries to open up alternative possibilities and give us a view of the future which (...)
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  19. David Turnbull, Henry Krips, Val Dusek, Steve Fuller, Alan Sokal, Jean Bricmont, Alan Frost, Alan Chalmers, Anna Salleh, Alfred I. Tauber, Yvonne Luxford, Nicolaas Rupke, Steven French, Peter G. Brown, Hugh LaFollette, Peter Machamer, Nicolas Rasmussen, Andy J. Miller, Marya Schechtman, Ross S. West, John Forge, David Oldroyd, Nancy Demand, Darrin W. Belousek, Warren Schmaus, Sungook Hong, Rachel A. Ankeny, Peter Anstey, Jeremy Butterfield & Harshi Gunawardena (2000). Clarity, Charity and Criticism, Wit, Wisdom and Worldliness: Avoiding Intellectual Impositions. [REVIEW] Metascience 9 (3):347-498.
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  20. Brian Ellis, Phil Dowe, Brian Skyrms & John Forge (1999). The Really Big Questions. Metascience 8 (1):63-85.
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  21. John Forge (1999). Laws of Nature as Relations Between Quantities? In Howard Sankey (ed.), Causation and Laws of Nature. Kluwer. 111--124.
  22. John Forge (1999). What You See Ain't What You Get: More Quantum Measurement Puzzles. [REVIEW] Metascience 8 (2):267-277.
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  23. Jane Azevedo, John Forge, Alan MacKay-Sim, Merry Maisel & Don Howard (1998). Biomedical Research, Methodology, and the Moral Sense. Metascience 7 (2):237-272.
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  24. John Forge (1998). The Industrial Revolution in Great Britain. In Martin Bridgstock (ed.), Science, Technology, and Society: An Introduction. Cambridge University Press. 111.
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  25. John Forge (1998). Tales of Schrödinger's Cat. Metascience 7 (1):151-166.
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  26. John Forge (1997). Hidden Variables Revealed. Metascience 6 (2):46-58.
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  27. Lars Bergstrom, John Forge, Louis Marinoff, John Leslie & Sami Pihlstrom (1996). International Studies in the Philosophy of Science. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science: Isps 10:187.
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  28. Greg Dening, John Forge & James Robert Brown (1996). Essay Review. Metascience 5 (2):21-39.
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  29. John Forge (1996). Explanation and the Quantum State. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 10 (3):203 – 215.
    Abstract This paper argues that there are good reasons to adopt a non-reductive account of states when it comes to quantum mechanics. That is to say, it is argued that there are advantages to thinking about states as sui generis, as reducible to classes of values of quantities, when it comes to the quantum domain. One reason for holding this view is that it seems to improve the prospects for explanation. In more detail, it is argued that there is an (...)
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  30. John Forge (1996). Laws and States in Quantum Mechanics. In. In P. Riggs (ed.), Natural Kinds, Laws of Nature and Scientific Methodology. Kluwer Academic Publishers. 163--185.
  31. John Forge (1996). Untitled Contribution to Review Symposium‹ Finitism Interruptus?‹ Interests' and the Foundations of SSK. Metascience 11:34-41.
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  32. Martin Rudwick, Naomi Oreskes, David Oldroyd, David Philip Miller, Alan Chalmers, John Forge, David Turnbull, Peter Slezak, David Bloor, Craig Callender, Keith Hutchison, Steven Savitt & Huw Price (1996). Review Symposia. Metascience 5 (1):7-85.
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  33. John Forge (1995). Bigelow and Pargetter on Quantities. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 73 (4):594 – 605.
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  34. John Forge (1993). Errors of Measurement and Explanation-as-Unification. Philosophia 22 (1-2):41-61.
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  35. John Forge (1993). How Should We Explain Remote Correlations? Philosophica 51.
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  36. John Forge (1990). Theoretical Explanation and Errors of Measurement. Erkenntnis 33 (3):371 - 390.
    By using the concept of a uniformity, the Structuralists have given us a most useful means of representing approximations. In the second section of this paper, I have made use of this technique to show how we can deal with errors of measurement — imprecise explananda — in the context of theoretical explanation. As well as (I hope) providing further demonstration of the power of the Structuralist approach, this also serves to support the ontic conception of explanation by showing that (...)
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  37. John Forge (1986). David Armstrong on Functional Laws. Philosophy of Science 53 (4):584-587.
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  38. John Forge (1986). The Instance Theory of Explanation. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 64 (2):127 – 142.
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  39. John Forge (1985). Theoretical Explanation in Physical Science. Erkenntnis 23 (3):269 - 294.
    An account of physical explanation derived from the instance view of scientific explanation is outlined, and it is shown that this account does not cover explanations by theories which contain theoretical functions. An alternative account, also derived from the instance view, is proposed on the basis of Sneed's account of theories. It is shown that this account does cover theoretical explanations. Finally, it is shown that this account can accommodate explananda that record errors of measurement.
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  40. John Forge (1984). Theoretical Functions in Physical Science. Erkenntnis 21 (1):1 - 29.
    The aim of this paper is to give an account of theoreticity which captures the preanalytic conception of a theoretical function, which is precise and yet which expresses what is significant about theoretical functions. The point of departure for this account is a recent discussion of the topic by Balzer and Moulines. On the basis of criticism of this discussion and on the basis of an examination of laboratory measurement, an account of theoreticity is proposed.
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  41. John Forge (1984). Theoretical Functions, Theory and Evidence. Philosophy of Science 51 (3):443-463.
    Glymour's account of confirmation is seen to have paradoxical consequences when applied to the confirmation of theories containing theoretical functions. An alternative conception of instances derived from Sneed's reconstruction of physical theories is conjoined with the instance view of confirmation to produce an account of confirmation that avoids these problems. The topic of selective confirmation is discussed, and it is argued that theories containing theoretical functions are not selectively confirmable.
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  42. John Forge (1982). Towards a Theory of Models In Physical Science. Philosophy Research Archives 8:321-338.
    The purpose of this paper is to provide an analysis of the concept of model as it is applied in the physical sciences, and to show that this analysis is fruitful insofar as it can be used as an acceptable account of the role of models in physical explanation.A realist interpretation of theories is adopted as a point of departure. A distinction between theories and models is drawn on the basis of this interpretation. The relation between model and prototype is (...)
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  43. John Forge (1980). The Structure of Physical Explanation. Philosophy of Science 47 (2):203-226.
    Some features of physical science relevant for a discussion of physical explanation are mentioned. The D-N account of physical explanation is discussed, and it is seen to restrict the scope of explanation in physical science because it imposes the requirement that the explanandum must be deducible from the explanans. Analysis shows that an alternative view of scientific explanation, called the instance view, allows a wider range of physical explanations. The view is seen to be free from a certain class of (...)
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