Search results for 'John G. Bruhn' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. John G. Bruhn (2009). The Functionality of Gray Area Ethics in Organizations. Journal of Business Ethics 89 (2):205 - 214.score: 870.0
    All organizations have gray areas where the border between right and wrong behavior is blurred, but where a major part of organizational decision-making takes place. While gray areas can be sources of problems for organizations, they also have benefits. The author proposes that gray areas are functional in organizations. Gray areas become problematic when the process for dealing with them is flawed, when gatekeeper managers see themselves as more ethical than their peers, and when leaders, by their own inattention, inaction, (...)
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  2. John G. Bruhn (2008). Value Dissonance and Ethics Failure in Academia: A Causal Connection? [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 6 (1):17-32.score: 870.0
    Ethics failure in academia is not new, yet its prevalence, causes, and methods to prevent it remain a matter of debate. The author’s premise is that value dissonance underlies most of the reasons ethics failure occurs. Vignettes are used to illustrate value dissonance at the individual and institutional levels. Suggestions are offered for ways academic institutions can assume greater responsibility as a moral agency to prevent the occurrence of ethics failure.
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  3. John Rosser (1996). Jutta-Annette Bruhn, Coins and Costume in Late Antiquity.(Dumbarton Oaks Byzantine Collection Publications, 9.) Washington, DC: Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, 1993. Paper. Pp. Iii, 68; Black-and-White Figures, 1 Map. $12. [REVIEW] Speculum 71 (1):134-135.score: 36.0
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  4. Hans-Peter Söder (2009). The Politics of Memory: History, Biography, and the (Re)-Emergence of Generational Literature in Germany. The European Legacy 14 (2):177-185.score: 8.0
    The existentialist philosopher Karl Jaspers is the father of a discourse on the spiritual consequences of the Holocaust. First addressed as the Schuldfrage (the question of guilt) by Jaspers immediately after the Second World War in his famous Heidelberg lecture, it has reappeared in various forms in German life and letters. Post-unification Germany has witnessed the valorization of the German experience of the Second World War. This ongoing re-evaluation has its antecedents in the generational literature of the 1970s and 1980s. (...)
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