1.  57
    John G. Bruhn (2009). The Functionality of Gray Area Ethics in Organizations. Journal of Business Ethics 89 (2):205 - 214.
    All organizations have gray areas where the border between right and wrong behavior is blurred, but where a major part of organizational decision-making takes place. While gray areas can be sources of problems for organizations, they also have benefits. The author proposes that gray areas are functional in organizations. Gray areas become problematic when the process for dealing with them is flawed, when gatekeeper managers see themselves as more ethical than their peers, and when leaders, by their own inattention, inaction, (...)
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  2.  25
    John G. Bruhn (2008). Value Dissonance and Ethics Failure in Academia: A Causal Connection? [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 6 (1):17-32.
    Ethics failure in academia is not new, yet its prevalence, causes, and methods to prevent it remain a matter of debate. The author’s premise is that value dissonance underlies most of the reasons ethics failure occurs. Vignettes are used to illustrate value dissonance at the individual and institutional levels. Suggestions are offered for ways academic institutions can assume greater responsibility as a moral agency to prevent the occurrence of ethics failure.
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  3. John G. Bruhn (2009). The Functionality of Gray Area Ethics in Organizations. Journal of Business Ethics 89 (2):205-214.
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