Search results for 'John H. Felts' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. John H. Felts (2002). Henry Ingersoll Bowditch and Oliver Wendell Holmes: Stethoscopists and Reformers. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 45 (4):539-548.score: 870.0
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  2. John H. Felts (1998). Privies, Spiders, Worms, and Weeds. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 42 (1):75-82.score: 870.0
     
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  3. J. H. Felts (1998). Dietl's Crisis: The Rise and Fall of Medical Eponyms. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 43 (1):47-53.score: 240.0
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  4. J. H. Felts (1997). Unlicensed on the Information Highway. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 41 (1):98-100.score: 240.0
     
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  5. Piers H. G. Stephens (2009). Toward a Jamesian Environmental Philosophy. Environmental Ethics 31 (3):227-244.score: 15.0
    William James’s radical empiricism and pragmatism constitutes a philosophy that can reconcile the split between intrinsic value theorists, who stress the development and relevance of theoretical axiology, and pragmatists who have favored a more direct emphasis on environmental policy and application. By distinguishing James’s emphasis on direct personal experience from John Dewey’s more socialized approach, James’s distinctive emphasis on the transformative possibilities of pure experience and his links to romantic sensibility enable us to articulate and validate the noninstrumental aspects (...)
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  6. Peter R. Anstey (ed.) (2006). John Locke: Critical Assessments of Leading Political Philosophers. Routledge.score: 14.0
    Today, John Locke is recognized as one of the most important and formative philosophical influences on the modern world. His imprint is still felt in political and legal thought, in educational theory, moral theory and in the theory of knowledge. Lockes key works, Two Treatises of Government , and the monumental An Essay Concerning Human Understanding , provoked lively debate when they were first published in 1690 and remain standard texts in undergraduate philosophy courses throughout the English-speaking world and (...)
     
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  7. Matthew Sharpe (2012). Changing Aristotle's Mind and World : Critical Notes on McDowell's Aristotle. Philosophy Study 2 (11):804-821.score: 12.0
    Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics is central to John McDowell’s classic Mind and World. In Lectures IV and V of that work, McDowell makes three claims concerning Aristotle’s ethics: first, that Aristotle did not base his ethics on an externalist, naturalistic basis (including a theory of human nature); second, that attempts to read him as an ethical naturalist are a modern anachronism, generated by the supposed need to ground all viable philosophical claims on claims analogous to the natural sciences; and third, (...)
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  8. John Schwenkler (2012). On the Matching of Seen and Felt Shape by Newly Sighted Subjects. I-Perception 3 (3):186-188.score: 10.0
    How do we recognize identities between seen shapes and felt ones? Is this due to associative learning, or to intrinsic connections these sensory modalities? We can address this question by testing the capacities of newly sighted subjects to match seen and felt shapes, but only if it is shown that the subjects can see the objects well enough to form adequate visual representations of their shapes. In light of this, a recent study by R. Held and colleagues fails to demonstrate (...)
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  9. John Dillon (2005). The Heirs of Plato: A Study of the Old Academy (347-274 BC). Clarendon Press.score: 10.0
    The Heirs of Plato is the first book exclusively devoted to an in-depth study of the various directions in philosophy taken by Plato's followers in the first seventy years or so following his death in 347 BC. - the period generally known as 'The Old Academy'. Speusippus, Xenocrates, and Polemon, the three successive heads of the Academy in this period, though personally devoted to the memory of Plato, were independent philosophers in their own right, and felt free to develop his (...)
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  10. Bernard E. Rollin (2007). Animal Mind: Science, Philosophy, and Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 11 (3):253-274.score: 8.0
    Although 20th-century empiricists were agnostic about animal mind and consciousness, this was not the case for their historical ancestors – John Locke, David Hume, Jeremy Bentham, John Stuart Mill, and, of course, Charles Darwin and George John Romanes. Given the dominance of the Darwinian paradigm of evolutionary continuity, one would not expect belief in animal mind to disappear. That it did demonstrates that standard accounts of how scientific hypotheses are overturned – i.e., by empirical disconfirmation or by (...)
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  11. Henry P. Stapp, Philosophy of Mind and the Problem of Free Will in the Light of Quantum Mechanics.score: 8.0
    Arguments pertaining to the mind-brain connection and to the physical effectiveness of our conscious choices have been presented in two recent books, one by John Searle, the other by Jaegwon Kim. These arguments are examined, and it is explained how the encountered difficulties arise from a defective understanding and application of a pertinent part of contemporary science, namely quantum mechanics. The principled quantum uncertainties entering at the microscopic levels of brain processing cannot be confined to the micro level, but (...)
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  12. Jeffrie G. Murphy (1978). Hume and Kant on the Social Contract. Philosophical Studies 33 (1):65 - 79.score: 8.0
    The central or dominant intellectual model which provided the structure of social and political thought in the 18th century was the "social contract". Both hume and kant felt obliged to assess it carefully-Hume coming out an opponent and kant a supporter of the model. This opposition is particularly interesting for the following reason: hume's attack on social contract theory is directed primarily against hobbes and locke, And it is interesting to see if post-Humean social contract theories (especially kant's and that (...)
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  13. Franz Huber (2008). Hempel's Logic of Confirmation. Philosophical Studies 139 (2):181 - 189.score: 8.0
    This paper presents a new analysis of C.G. Hempel’s conditions of adequacy for any relation of confirmation [Hempel C. G. (1945). Aspects of scientific explanation and other essays in the philosophy of science. New York: The Free Press, pp. 3–51.], differing from the one Carnap gave in §87 of his [1962. Logical foundations of probability (2nd ed.). Chicago: University of Chicago Press.]. Hempel, it is argued, felt the need for two concepts of confirmation: one aiming at true hypotheses and another (...)
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  14. Henry P. Stapp (2001). Quantum Theory and the Role of Mind in Nature. Foundations of Physics 31 (10):1465-1499.score: 8.0
    Orthodox Copenhagen quantum theory renounces the quest to understand the reality in which we are imbedded, and settles for practical rules describing connections between our observations. Many physicist have regarded this renunciation of our effort describe nature herself as premature, and John von Neumann reformulated quantum theory as a theory of an evolving objective universe interacting with human consciousness. This interaction is associated both in Copenhagen quantum theory and in von Neumann quantum theory with a sudden change that brings (...)
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  15. Stevan Harnad, What is Consciousness?score: 8.0
    Exchange with John Searle on How/Why some functions are felt functions.
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  16. Tom Baldwin, Roger Brownsword & Harald Schmidt (2009). Stewardship, Paternalism and Public Health: Further Thoughts. Public Health Ethics 2 (1):113-116.score: 8.0
    Nuffield Council on Bioethics, London * Corresponding author: Nuffield Council on Bioethics, 28 Bedford Square, London WC1B 3JS, UK. Email: hschmidt{at}nuffieldbioethics.org ' + u + '@' + d + ' '//--> Abstract In November 2007, the Nuffield Council on Bioethics published the report Public Health: Ethical Issues . While the report has been welcomed by a wide range of stakeholders, there has also been some criticism. First, it has been suggested that it is not clear why, in developing its ‘stewardship (...)
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  17. Manuel Vargas (2009). Five Questions on Philosophy of Action. In Jesus Aguilar & Andre Buckareff (eds.), Philosophy of Action: 5 Questions.score: 8.0
    In terms of my own first-personal narrative, the most obvious proximal cause of my theorizing about agency was a graduate seminar on free will taught by Peter van Inwagen. It was my first semester of graduate school, and van Inwagen’s forceful presentation of incompatibilism made a big impression on me. I left that course thinking incompatibilism was both obvious and irrefutable. The only problem was that I didn’t stay at Notre Dame. I transferred to Stanford in the following year, where (...)
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  18. Franz Huber (2005). The Logic of Confirmation and Theory Assessment. In L. Behounek & M. Bilkova (eds.), The Logica Yearbook. Filosofia.score: 8.0
    This paper discusses an almost sixty year old problem in the philosophy of science -- that of a logic of confirmation. We present a new analysis of Carl G. Hempel's conditions of adequacy (Hempel 1945), differing from the one Carnap gave in §87 of his Logical Foundations of Probability (1962). Hempel, it is argued, felt the need for two concepts of confirmation: one aiming at true theories and another aiming at informative theories. However, he also realized that these two concepts (...)
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  19. Lisa S. Parker (2012). The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, Feminist Themes, and Research Ethics. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 5 (1):159-165.score: 8.0
    In 1951 Henrietta Lacks felt a lump in her cervix, entered Johns Hopkins Hospital, and was examined in a colored-only exam room by a physician who biopsied the lump. Called back to Hopkins for treatment of diagnosed carcinoma of the cervix, Henrietta signed a one-line “Operation Permit,” and under general anesthesia received her first round of radium treatment. Before sewing a tube of radium into her cervix, the surgeon on duty took samples of tumor and healthy tissue, and as with (...)
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  20. Vincent Colapietro (2010). Present at the End?: Who Will Be There When the Last Stone is Thrown? Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 46 (1):9-20.score: 8.0
    From time to time, Peter H. Hare emphatically reminded me he was drawn to William James as a philosopher, not just a stylist. While Peter1 was throughout his life appreciative of James's efforts to articulate an ethics of belief (see, e.g., Hare 2003), he was skeptical of them in the context of religion. He felt compelled to hound the gods and their defenders (Hare and Madden 1969). Even so, the ethics of belief outlined and partly filled in by James provided (...)
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  21. Russell T. Hurlburt & Eric Schwitzgebel (2007). Describing Inner Experience? Proponent Meets Skeptic. MIT Press.score: 8.0
    On a remarkably thin base of evidence – largely the spectral analysis of points of light – astronomers possess, or appear to possess, an abundance of knowledge about the structure and history of the universe. We likewise know more than might even have been imagined a few centuries ago about the nature of physical matter, about the mechanisms of life, about the ancient past. Enormous theoretical and methodological ingenuity has been required to obtain such knowledge; it does not invite easy (...)
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  22. Peter Singer, The Great Ape Debate.score: 8.0
    In his History of European Morals, published in 1869, the Irish historian and philosopher W.E.H. Lecky wrote: At one time the benevolent affections embrace merely the family, soon the circle expanding includes first a class, then a nation, then a coalition of nations, then all humanity and finally, its influence is felt in the dealings of man with the animal world... The expansion of the moral circle could be about to take a significant step forwards. Francisco Garrido, a bioethicist and (...)
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  23. Scott Welsh (2012). Coming to Terms with the Antagonism Between Rhetorical Reflection and Political Agency. Philosophy and Rhetoric 45 (1):1-23.score: 8.0
    Now over a decade since the publication of John Michael’s Anxious Intellects (2000), many rhetoric scholars are no less anxious about the relevance of scholarship to public affairs. Recent exchanges concerning rhetorical criticism, public intellectualism, and academic engagement continue to provide evidence of a prominent felt need to prove public relevance, explain away the lack of readily apparent public engagement, or adopt a more activist posture. That academic work should have political consequences is broadly assumed within a dominant strain (...)
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  24. Gary L. Chamberlain (1971). The Drive for Meaning in William James' Analysis of Religious Experience. Journal of Value Inquiry 5 (3):194-206.score: 8.0
    Now that we have looked at the characteristics of mystical experience, we are ready to discuss the assumption made in this paper that mystical experience can be translated into an understanding of “integration” or the drive for meaning which Fingarette pursues in a much more analytic fashion. Reviewing the conversion process as an “integration” process we have seen that for the sick-souled, beset with the meaninglessness or melancholy which paralyzes his will, his own awareness of wrong in his situation prevents (...)
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  25. Mark Wilson, Inference and Correlational Truth'.score: 8.0
    This is one of those cases to which Dr. 8 oodhouse's remark applies with all its force, that a method which leads to true results must have its logic — H.S Smith (" On Some of the Methods at Present in Use in Pure Geometry," p. 6) A goodly amount of modern metaphysics has concerned itself, in one form or another, with the question: what attitude should we take in regard to a language whose semantic underpinnings seem less than certain? (...)
     
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  26. Frank M. Oppenheim (2006). Did Royce "Outline" His Dissertation? Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 42 (4):463-482.score: 8.0
    : Josiah Royce, a Johns Hopkins Fellow (1876–1878), polished two manuscripts for publication: "The Spirit of Modern Philosophy" (SMP; 62 pp.), and his dissertation, "The Interdependence of the Principles of Knowledge" (IPK; xi + 332 pp.). Although he penned the texts in blue ink and headers and footnotes in red, he never published either work. SMP—not Royce's 1892 work of the same title—critiqued Francis Bowen's Modern Philosophy from Descartes to Schopenhauer and Hartman, and created a new epistemology. My essay ventures (...)
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  27. Noam Chomsky, Visions of Righteousness.score: 8.0
    h cme of his sermons cm humzm righrs, President Carter explained char we owe Vietnam no debt and have no responsibility co render in any assistance because "chc descrucrion was mu:ual."g Ifwcntds have meaning, this must stand among [hc most astonishing scmzcmcms in diplomatic hismry. What is most interesting about chis scaccmcm is thc reaction to it among cducacccl Americans: null. Furthermore, thc cccasional rcfcrcncc cc it, and what it means, evokes FLO comment amd FLO inccrst. Ir; is considcrcd ncithcr (...)
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  28. Adam Hood (2013). John Oman on Feeling and Theology. Religious Studies 49 (1):5-18.score: 8.0
    This article revisits Oman's idea that an intuitive felt knowledge of the divine underlies the articulate knowledge found in faith and theology. Such feeling, Oman claims, is analogous to ordinary perception and gives rise to the attempt to evaluate, understand, and respond to the divine. Theology is the formalized attempt to respond to the intuition of the divine. The article argues that Oman's emphasis on the experiential and experimental character of theology is helpful, but that his analysis of the logic (...)
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  29. Russell T. Hurlburt & Eric Schwitzgebel (2007). Part One Proponent Meets Skeptic. In Describing Inner Experience? Proponent Meets Skeptic.score: 8.0
    On a remarkably thin base of evidence – largely the spectral analysis of points of light – astronomers possess, or appear to possess, an abundance of knowledge about the structure and history of the universe. We likewise know more than might even have been imagined a few centuries ago about the nature of physical matter, about the mechanisms of life, about the ancient past. Enormous theoretical and methodological ingenuity has been required to obtain such knowledge; it does not invite easy (...)
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  30. Louis Logister (2006). State Morality Versus Individual Freedom. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 2:67-71.score: 8.0
    In the contemporary western, liberal, constitutional and secularized state, the need is felt for a cohesionconserving force. Human rights and citizenship, assets of Enlightenment and Revolution, prove to be individualizing powers that miss the communitarian inclination of former times. With the rise of violence, crime and other ways of breaking the law the state seems less able to fulfil its role as guardian of assets like freedom and security. The call for a strong state that interferes in people's behavior is (...)
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  31. Michael Murray, Seek and You Will Find.score: 8.0
    During the spring of 1983 I began my third semester in college giving serious consideration to the thought of becoming a philosophy major. I had taken a few courses and found the subject intriguing. More influential in my own considerations was the fact that I had recently converted to Christianity and had been encouraged by some early mentors in the faith to read the works of various Christian philosophers both contemporary and classical. One evening that semester I was studying for (...)
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  32. Vincent W. J. Van Gerven Oei (2012). The Poetry of Jean Daive. Continent 2 (2).score: 8.0
    continent. 2.2 (2012): 82–98 NOTE: This text is a translation of the original essay “Tekendichtheid: Over Jean Daives Narration d’équilibre 2: ‘Sllt’ ,” published in Parmentier 21.2 (2012): p. 65-71, accompanied by the same selection of poems in Dutch translation. It is not my intention to offer the following notes pertaining to one part of the series Narration d’équilibre [ Narrative of equilibrium ], written by the poet, translator, photographer, encyclopedist, and radio maker Jean Daive (1941), as a meticulous overview (...)
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  33. Maxwell Stephen Kennel (2013). What is a Compendium? Parataxis, Hypotaxis, and the Question of the Book. Continent 3 (1):44-49.score: 8.0
    Writing, the exigency of writing: no longer the writing that has always (through a necessity in no way avoidable) been in the service of the speech or thought that is called idealist (that is to say, moralizing), but rather the writing that through its own slowly liberated force (the aleatory force of absence) seems to devote itself solely to itself as something that remains without identity, and little by little brings forth possibilities that are entirely other: an anonymous, distracted, deferred, (...)
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  34. Gary J. Shipley & Nicola Masciandaro (2012). Open Commentary to Eugene Thacker's" Cosmic Pessimism". Continent 2 (2):76-81.score: 8.0
    continent. 2.2 (2012): 76–81 Comments on Eugene Thacker’s “Cosmic Pessimism” Nicola Masciandaro Anything you look forward to will destroy you, as it already has. —Vernon Howard In pessimism, the first axiom is a long, low, funereal sigh. The cosmicity of the sigh resides in its profound negative singularity. Moving via endless auto-releasement, it achieves the remote. “ Oltre la spera che piú larga gira / passa ’l sospiro ch’esce del mio core ” [Beyond the sphere that circles widest / penetrates (...)
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  35. Chery Smith, Jamie Butterfass & Rickelle Richards (2010). Environment Influences Food Access and Resulting Shopping and Dietary Behaviors Among Homeless Minnesotans Living in Food Deserts. Agriculture and Human Values 27 (2):141-161.score: 8.0
    Qualitative and quantitative methods were used to investigate how shopping behaviors and environment influence dietary intake and weight status among homeless Minnesotans living in food deserts. Seven focus groups (n = 53) and a quantitative survey (n = 255), using the social cognitive theory as the theoretical framework, were conducted at two homeless shelters (S1 and S2) in the Twin Cities area. Heights, weights, and 24-h dietary recalls were also collected. Food stores within a five-block radius of the shelters were (...)
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  36. David Rothenberg (1996). No World but in Things: The Poetry of Naess's Concrete Contents. Inquiry 39 (2):255 – 272.score: 8.0
    Arne Naess introduced the notion of ?concrete contents? to posit that the qualities we perceive in nature are intrinsic to the things themselves, and not just projections of our senses on to the world. This gives environmentalism more credence than if secondary qualities about the environment are considered subjective in a pejorative sense. But the concrete contents position pushes philosophy toward poetry because it suggests that felt qualities are as primary as logic. For a philosophy to justify itself, it sometimes (...)
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  37. Rodrigo Coppe Caldeira (2009). Bases temporais para o estudo histórico da Igreja católica do século XX. Horizonte 5 (10):75-90.score: 8.0
    Resumo O Concílio Vaticano II causou, com seus textos finais, grande comoção no interior da Igreja católica. Perpassado por lutas internas e conflitos doutrinais e ideológicos, os padres conciliares produziram textos calcados em certo "compromisso de pluralismo contraditório". Tal "compromisso" despertou grandes questões para o magistério e para os católicos, já que uma hermenêutica "correta" dos textos era exigida com o passar do tempo. Dessa forma, no período denominado de "pós-concílio", a luta pelos significados de seus textos continuou e ainda (...)
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  38. Jamie Iredell (2011). Belief: An Essay. Continent 1 (4).score: 8.0
    continent. 1.4 (2011): 279—285. Concerning its Transitive Nature, the Conversion of Native Americans of Spanish Colonial California, Indoctrinated Catholicism, & the Creation There’s no direct archaeological evidence that Jesus ever existed. 1 I memorized the Act of Contrition. I don’t remember it now, except the beginning: Forgive me Father for I have sinned . . . This was in preparation for the Sacrament of Holy Reconciliation, where in a confessional I confessed my sins to Father Scott, who looked like Jesus, (...)
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  39. Anna Lawrence (2003). 'I Thought I Felt a Sinful Desire': The Question of Celibacy for Eighteenth-Century Methodists. Bulletin of the John Rylands Library 85 (2):177-193.score: 8.0
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  40. Justine McGill (2013). Bad Memories: Haneke with Locke on Personal Identity and Post-Colonial Guilt. Film-Philosophy 17 (1):134-153.score: 8.0
    Michael Haneke's film Hidden ( Caché, 2005) raises questions about responsibility and guilt in the context of post-colonial inequities that are profoundly discomfiting for the viewer, framing a meditation on identity, consciousness and responsibility that is at once visceral and intellectual. On the reading presented here, this film makes visible and palpable some of the effects of the ' strange suppositions' about personal responsibility and memory that were first articulated by a philosopher who also felt called upon to justify colonialism: (...)
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  41. Jan-Werner Müller (2002). Rawls in Germany. European Journal of Political Theory 1 (2):163-179.score: 8.0
    This article analyses the reception of John Rawls's thought by Otfried Höffe, Jürgen Habermas and other political theorists on the German liberal left. It argues that, ironically, as Rawls's theory has become more historically self-conscious and sociologically oriented since A Theory of Justice, Habermas, while denying any fundamental difference between him and Rawls in this `neo-Kantian family quarrel', has moved in the opposite direction. One might even say that there has been some mid-Atlantic convergence in political theory. Nevertheless, there (...)
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  42. Samuel Vriezen (2012). The Poetry of Jeroen Mettes. Continent 2 (1):22-28.score: 8.0
    continent. 2.1 (2012): 22–28. Jeroen Mettes burst onto the Dutch poetry scene twice. First, in 2005, when he became a strong presence on the nascent Dutch poetry blogosphere overnight as he embarked on his critical project Dichtersalfabet (Poet’s Alphabet). And again in 2011, when to great critical acclaim (and some bafflement) his complete writings were published – almost five years after his far too early death. 2005 was the year in which Dutch poetry blogging exploded. That year saw the foundation (...)
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  43. Vanda L. Zammuner & Nico H. Frijda (1994). Felt and Communicated Emotions: Sadness and Jealousy. Cognition and Emotion 8 (1):37-53.score: 8.0
  44. Michael O'Rourke (2011). The Afterlives of Queer Theory. Continent 1 (2):102-116.score: 8.0
    continent. 1.2 (2011): 102-116. All experience open to the future is prepared or prepares itself to welcome the monstrous arrivant, to welcome it, that is, to accord hospitality to that which is absolutely foreign or strange [….] All of history has shown that each time an event has been produced, for example in philosophy or in poetry, it took the form of the unacceptable, or even of the intolerable, or the incomprehensible, that is, of a certain monstrosity. Jacques Derrida “Passages—from (...)
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  45. Elizabeth Schier & John Sutton (2014). Philosophy of Mind and Cognitive Science Since 1980. In Graham Oppy & Nick Trakakis (eds.), History of Philosophy in Australia and New Zealand. Springer.score: 4.0
    If Australasian philosophers constitute the kind of group to which a collective identity or broadly shared self-image can plausibly be ascribed, the celebrated history of Australian materialism rightly lies close to its heart. Jack Smart’s chapter in this volume, along with an outstanding series of briefer essays in A Companion to Philosophy in Australia and New Zealand (Forrest 2010; Gold 2010; Koksvik 2010; Lycan 2010; Matthews 2010; Nagasawa 2010; Opie 2010; Stoljar 2010a), effectively describe the naturalistic realism of Australian philosophy (...)
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  46. Mark H. Bickhard, Psychopathology.score: 4.0
    In this paper I wish to address the question of the nature of psychopathology. It might naturally be felt that we already know a great deal about psychopathology, and thus that such a paper would be primarily a review and discussion of the literature; I will argue, however, that the most fundamental form of the question concerning the nature of psychopathology is rarely posed in the literature, that it is prevented from being posed by presuppositions inherent in standard theoretical approaches, (...)
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  47. John T. Sanders (1998). Knowledge and Description: Bohr's Epistemology. In Jan Such & Malgorzata Szczesniak (eds.), Z epistemologii wiedzy naukowej. Wydawnictwo Naukowe Instytutu Filozofii.score: 4.0
    In this paper, I try to explain the philosophical problems that Niels Bohr felt had been exposed by the discovery of the "quantum of action," and by the emergence of the quantum theory that arose in large part as a result of his efforts. I won't have space to make the case adequately here, but my own view is that we have not yet fully digested the message brought to us by Bohr's "Copenhagen Interpretation" of Quantum Mechanics, and I suspect (...)
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  48. John Sutton (2010). Carelessness and Inattention: Mind-Wandering and the Physiology of Fantasy From Locke to Hume. In Charles Wolfe & Ofer Gal (eds.), The Body as Object and Instrument of Knowledge: embodied empiricism in early modern science. Springer. 243--263.score: 4.0
    1. The restless mind[1] Like us, early modern philosophers, both natural and moral, didn’t always understand the springs of their own actions. They didn’t want to feel everything they felt, and couldn’t trace the sources of all their thoughts and imaginings. Events from past experience come to mind again unwilled: abstract thought is interrupted by fantastical images, like the ‘winged horses, fiery dragons, and monstrous giants’ by which Hume exemplified ‘the liberty of the imagination’[2]. Then, as now, a failure to (...)
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  49. John Sabini & John Monterosso (2005). Judgments of the Fairness of Using Performance Enhancing Drugs. Ethics and Behavior 15 (1):81 – 94.score: 4.0
    Undergraduates (total N = 185) were asked about performance-affecting drugs. Some drugs supposedly affected athletic performance, others memory, and others attention. Some improved performance for anyone who took them, others for the top 10% of performers, others for the bottom 10%, and finally, yet other drugs worked only on the bottom 10% who also showed physical abnormalities. Participants were asked about the fairness of allowing the drug to be used, about banning it, and about whether predictions of future performance based (...)
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