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  1. John Hardwig, The End Game.
    To be old is to face the end of life. This is not to say that young people never die. Nor that the old have nothing else to do, no valuable contribution still to make. But after old age comes death. That=s simply a biological fact. It will remain a fact regardless of the medical technologies..
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  2. John Hardwig, Privacy, Self Knowledge, and the Commune:Toward an Epistemology of the Family.
    Advocates of communal living often urge that life in a commune provides the framework for a deeper knowledge of other people. I believe this is clearly true and because it is true, communal living is also instrumental in promoting self knowledge. The dialogue that is part of the life of a commune enables one to incorporate the insights of the other members into his understanding of himself and his world.
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  3. John Hardwig, Toward an Ethics of Expertise.
    Most professions rest on the expertise of their members. Professionals are professionals primarily because they know more than most of us about something of importance to our society or to many members of it. Professionals are given power, respect, prestige, and above average incomes. If professionals are worthy of this status, it is largely because of their special knowledge and the way they use it. And if professionals have special rights and responsibilities, it is also primarily because of the social (...)
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  4. John Hardwig, The Problem of Proxies with Interests of Their Own.
    A 78 year old married woman with progressive Alzheimer's disease was admitted to a local hospital with pneumonia and other medical problems. She recognized no one and had been incontinent for about a year. Despite aggressive treatment, the pneumonia failed to resolve and it seemed increasingly likely that this admission was to be for terminal care. The patient's husband (who had been taking care of her in their home) began requesting that the doctors be less aggressive in her treatment and, (...)
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  5. John Hardwig, What About the Family? - The Role of Family Interests in Medical Decision Making.
    We are beginning to recognize that the prevalent ethic of patient autonomy simply will not do. Since demands for health care are virtually unlimited, giving autonomous patients the health care they want will bankrupt our health care system. We can no longer simply buy our way out of difficult questions of justice by expanding the health care pie until there is enough to satisfy the wants and needs of everyone. The requirements of justice and the needs of other patients must (...)
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  6. Jack F. Bunde & John Hardwig (forthcoming). Chaplain's Role in End of Life Care. Hastings Center Report.
     
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  7. John Hardwig (2010). An Unbearable Task Reply. Hastings Center Report 40 (1):5-5.
     
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  8. John Hardwig (2010). John Hardwig Replies. Hastings Center Report 40 (1).
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  9. John Hardwig (2010). The Stockholder – a Lesson for Business Ethics From Bioethics? Journal of Business Ethics 91 (3):329 - 341.
    Business ethics – both stockholder and stakeholder theories – makes the same mistake as the one made by the traditional ethics of medicine. The traditional ethics of medicine was a teleological ethics predicated on the assumption that the goal of medicine was to prolong life and promote better health. But, as bioethicists have made plain, these are not the only or even the overriding goals of most patients. Most of us have goals and values that limit our desire for medical (...)
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  10. John Hardwig (2009). Going to Meet Death: The Art of Dying in the Early Part of the Twenty-First Century. Hastings Center Report 39 (4):37-45.
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  11. John Hardwig (2007). Ending Life: Ethics and the Way We Die. Social Theory and Practice 33 (3):501-507.
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  12. John Hardwig (2007). Socrates' Conception of Piety: Teaching the Euthyphro. Teaching Philosophy 30 (3):259-268.
    For Socrates, philosophy is self-examination. If the Euthyphro is still to be philosophy in this sense, it must challenge people living now. This paper offers a reading that does this. First, a better case is made for something like the kind of expertise Euthyphro claims and for his position about piety. Second, Socrates and Euthyphro embody different views about the kind of expertise that would be relevant to discovering and engendering piety. Finally, Socrates’ unorthodox conception of piety is made explicit. (...)
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  13. John Hardwig (2006). Rural Health Care Ethics: What Assumptions and Attitudes Should Drive the Research? American Journal of Bioethics 6 (2):53 – 54.
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  14. John Hardwig (2005). Families and Futility: Forestalling Demands for Futile Treatment. Journal of Clinical Ethics 16 (4):335.
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  15. John Hardwig (2000). A Call/for Discussion. Hastings Center Report 30 (2):28-30.
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  16. John Hardwig (2000). Is There a Duty to Die?: And Other Essays in Bio-Ethics. Routledge.
    Amid the controversies surrounding physician-assisted suicides, euthanasia, and long-term care for the elderly, a major component in the ethics of medicine is notably absent: the rights and welfare of the survivor's family, for whom serious illness and death can be emotionally and financially devastating. In this collection of eight provocative and timely essays, John Hardwig sets forth his views on the need to replace patient-centered bioethics with family-centered bioethics. Starting with a critique of the awkward language with which philosphers argue (...)
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  17. John Hardwig (2000). Spiritual Issues at the End of Life: A Call for Discussion. Hastings Center Report 30 (2):28-30.
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  18. John Hardwig (1999). Ls fhere. Bioethics: An Anthology 27 (2).
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  19. John Hardwig (1997). Autobiography, Biography, and Narrative Ethics. In Hilde Lindemann (ed.), Stories and Their Limits: Narrative Approaches to Bioethics. Routledge. 50--64.
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  20. John Hardwig (1997). Dying at the Right Time: Reflections on (Un) Assisted Suicide. In Hugh LaFollette - (ed.), Ethics in Practice. Basil Blackwell.
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  21. John Hardwig (1997). Is There a Duty to Die? Hastings Center Report 27 (2):34-42.
    When <span class='Hi'>Richard</span> Lamm made the statement that old people have a duty to die, it was generally shouted down or ridiculed. The whole idea is just too preposterous to entertain. Or too threatening. In fact, a fairly common argument against legalizing physician-assisted suicide is that if it were legal, some people might somehow get the idea that they have a duty to die. These people could only be the victims of twisted moral reasoning or vicious social pressure. It goes (...)
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  22. John Hardwig (1997). Privacy, Self-Knowledge And Pluralistic Communes: An Invitation To The Epistemology Of The Family'. In Hilde Lindemann (ed.), Feminism and Families. Routledge. 105--115.
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  23. John Hardwig (1995). SUPPORT and the Invisible Family. Hastings Center Report 25 (6):23-25.
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  24. John Hardwig (1991). The Role of Trust in Knowledge. Journal of Philosophy 88 (12):693-708.
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  25. John Hardwig (1990). What About the Family? Hastings Center Report 20 (2):5-10.
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  26. John Hardwig (1988). Donating Your Health Care Benefits. Hastings Center Report 18 (2):8-9.
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  27. John Hardwig (1988). Evidence, Testimony, and the Problem of Individualism — a Response to Schmitt. Social Epistemology 2 (4):309 – 321.
  28. John Hardwig (1987). Robin Hoods and Good Samaritans: The Role of Patients in Health Care Distribution. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 8 (1).
    There are good reasons — both medical and moral — for wanting to redistribute health care resources, and American hospitals and physicians are already involved in the practice of redistribution. However, such redistribution compromises both patient autonomy and the fiduciary relationship essential to medicine. These important values would be most completely preserved by a system in which patients themselves would be the agents of redistribution, by sharing their medical resources. Consequently, we should see whether patients would be willing to share (...)
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  29. John Hardwig (1985). Epistemic Dependence. Journal of Philosophy 82 (7):335-349.
    find myself believing all sorts 0f things for which I d0 not possess evidence: that smoking cigarettes causes lung cancer, that my car keeps stalling because the carburetor needs LO be rebuilt, that mass media threaten democracy, that slums cause emotional disorders, that my irregular heart beat is premature ventricular contraction, that students} grades are not correlated with success in the ncmacadcmic world, that nuclear power plants are not safe (enough) . . . The list 0f things I believe, though (...)
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  30. John Hardwig (1984). Should Women Think in Terms of Rights? Ethics 94 (3):441-455.
    W0mcn’s liberation, it is oftcn said, strikes closer t0 home than othcr forms of human liberation. Although basic shifts in attitudes arc required for thc liberation 0f, for example, workers 0r blacks and othcr ethnic minorities, thcsc types of liberation could bc accomplished without fundamental changes in what we call 0ur “privatc" lives or 0ur personal relationships. The liberation 0f blacks 0r workers is largely an affair 0f public roles and institutions, 21 matter 0f socialjusticc, and it is thus carried (...)
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  31. John Hardwig (1983). Action From Duty but Not in Accord with Duty. Ethics 93 (2):283-290.
    In thc Foundations, Kant draws a distinction bctwccn action which is in accord with duty and action which is done from the motive of duty. This is 21 famous distinction, of course, and thcrc arc many interesting issues concerning it and its implications for ethical thcory. In this paper, I wish t0 focus on just 0nc noteworthy feature of K2mt’s usc of this distinction. Likc any distinction bctwccn logical compatiblcs, this 0nc yields four logically possible classes of action: (1) actions (...)
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  32. John Hardwig (1973). The Achievement of Moral Rationality. Philosophy and Rhetoric 6 (3):171 - 185.
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  33. Alan Stone & John Hardwig (1973). The Uses of Disorder: Personal Identity and City Life, Richard Sennet. World Futures 13 (3):271-282.
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