34 found
Sort by:
Disambiguations:
John Hare [20]John E. Hare [14]John Edmund Hare [1]
  1. John Hare (2013). A Kantian Response to Jean Porter. Studies in Christian Ethics 26 (2):174-175.
    Jean Porter’s natural law theory and my divine command theory differ less than one might expect. Two differences that remain are that, with respect to deductivism, the view that we can deduce our moral obligations from human nature, we agree that human nature is insufficiently specific, but she does not acknowledge the place of revealed divine law in later scholasticism or the role for what Scotus calls ‘dispensations’. With respect to eudaimonism, the view that our choices are for the sake (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. John Hare (2013). Philosophical Comments on Ahmed's Proposal. Studies in Christian Ethics 26 (2):184-185.
    Arif Ahmed’s paper claims moral neutrality for game theory. This is not true, however, of much of classical game theory, for example Ken Binmore’s Game Theory and the Social Contract . The field has changed comparatively recently. With respect to his own version, he claims that evolutionary explanation of cooperation is incompatible with theism, but this is because he thinks just about anything is compatible with it. It is important to see that this critique is the same as the logical (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. John E. Hare (2013). Divine Command. In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. John Hare (2011). Kant, The Passions, and The Structure of Moral Motivation. Faith and Philosophy 28 (1):54-70.
    This paper is an account of Kant’s view of the passions, and their place in the structure of moral motivation. The paper lays out the relations Kant sees be­tween feelings, inclinations, affects and passions, by looking at texts in Metaphysics of Morals, Religion within the Boundaries of Mere Reason, Anthropology, and Lectures on Education. Then it discusses a famous passage in Groundwork about sympathetic inclination, and ends by proposing two ways in which Kant thinks feelings and inclinations enter into moral (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. John Hare (2011). Morality Without God? Journal of Moral Philosophy 8 (3):476-478.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. John E. Hare (2011). Ethics and Religion: Two Kantian Arguments. Philosophical Investigations 34 (2):151-168.
    This paper describes and defends two arguments connecting ethics and religion that Kant makes in Religion within the Boundaries of Mere Reason. The first argument is that the moral demand is too high for us in our natural capacities, and God's assistance is required to bridge the resulting moral gap. The second argument is that because humans desire to be happy as well as to be morally good, morality will be rationally unstable without belief in a God who can bring (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. John E. Hare (2010). A Companion to Philosophy of Religion (Second Edition). Wiley Blackwell.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. John E. Hare (2010). Atonement, Justification, and Sanctification. In A Companion to Philosophy of Religion (Second Edition). Wiley Blackwell.
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. John E. Hare (2010). Goodness. In Charles Taliaferro & Chad V. Meister (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Christian Philosophical Theology. Cambridge University Press.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Louise Antony, William Lane Craig, John Hare, Donald C. Hubin, Paul Kurtz, C. Stephen Layman, Mark C. Murphy, Walter Sinnott-Armstrong & Richard Swinburne (2009). Is Goodness Without God Good Enough?: A Debate on Faith, Secularism, and Ethics. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
  11. John E. Hare (2009). Pt. 2. Praecipue de Hominibus. The Supervenience of Goodness on Being. In Kevin Timpe & Eleonore Stump (eds.), Metaphysics and God: Essays in Honor of Eleonore Stump. Routledge.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. John Hare, Religion and Morality. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. John Hare (2007). Kant and Depravity. Philosophia Christi 9 (1):21-28.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. John E. Hare (2006). Prescriptive Realism. Philosophia Reformata 71 (1):14-30.
    In my book God’s Call1 I gave an historical account of the debate within twentieth century analytic philosophy between moral realism and expressivism. Moral realism is the view that moral properties like goodness or cruelty exist independently of our making judgements that things have such properties. Such judgements are, on this theory, objectively true when the things referred to have the specified properties and objectively false when they do not. Expressivism is the view that when a person makes a moral (...)
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. John Hare (2005). Kant on the Rational Instability of Atheism. In Andrew Dole & Andrew Chignell (eds.), God and the Ethics of Belief: New Essays in Philosophy of Religion. Cambridge University Press.
  16. John Hare (2005). Review of Linda Zagzebski, Divine Motivation Theory. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (2).
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. John Hare (2004). An Essay on Divine Authority. Mind 113 (450):375-379.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. John Hare (2004). Is There an Evolutionary Foundation for Human Morality? In Phillip Clayton & Jeffrey Schloss (eds.), Evolution and Ethics: Human Morality in Biological and Religious Perspective. Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co.. 187--203.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. John Hare (2004). Review: An Essay on Divine Authority. [REVIEW] Mind 113 (450):375-379.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. John E. Hare (2002). R. M. Hare: A Memorial Address. Utilitas 14 (03):306-.
    My assigned task is to lay out the shape of my father's life and faith. This is daunting, but it is also a privilege because I loved him and admired him, and his life has been central in shaping my own. I am speaking also on behalf of my mother, my three sisters, Bridget, Louise and Ellie, and our children, Catherine and Andrew, Sam and Anisa, Hannah and Matty.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. John Hare (2000). Review: Korsgaard, Creating the Kingdom of Ends. [REVIEW] Faith and Philosophy 17 (3):371-383.
  22. John Hare (2000). Creating the Kingdom of Ends. [REVIEW] Faith and Philosophy 17 (3):371-383.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. John Hare (2000). Scotus on Morality and Nature. Medieval Philosophy and Theology 9 (1):15-38.
    This article is part of a larger project defending a version of divine command theory in ethics. What I am interested in from Scotus is that he combines such a theory with a view that grounds ethics in nature, especially human nature. In order to understand this combination, we need to start with his view of the two affections. Scotus takes from Anselm the idea that humans have in their will two basic affections (or intellectual appetites), what he calls the (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. John E. Hare (2000). Kant on Recognizing Our Duties As God's Commands. Faith and Philosophy 17 (4):459-478.
    Kant both says that we should recognize our duties as God’s commands, and objects to the theological version of heteronomy, ‘which derives morality from a divine and supremely perfect will’. In this paper I discuss how these two views fit together, and in the process I develop a notion of autonomous submission to divine moral authority. I oppose the ‘constitutive’ view of autonomy proposed by J. B. Schneewind and Christine Korsgaard. I locate Kant’s objection to theological heteronomy against the background (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. John Hare (1994). Puffing Up the Capacity. Journal of Philosophical Research 19:75-88.
    This paper is about the failure of a particular strategy to overcome the problem of the gap between the moral demand and natural human capacities to meet that demand. The strategy is that of the optimist, who thinks that humans do in fact have the resources to empower themselves to Iive by the moral demand. A conspicuous optimist of this sort is Shelly Kagan, in his book The Limits of Morality. The optimist makes a counterfactual claim about morality: If all (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. John E. Hare (1994). Review: Rossi & Wreen (Eds), Kant's Philosophy of Religion Reconsidered. [REVIEW] Faith and Philosophy 11 (1):138-144.
  27. John E. Hare (1994). Kant's Philosophy of Religion Reconsidered. [REVIEW] Faith and Philosophy 11 (1):138-144.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. John Hare (1988). Έλευθεριότης in Aristotle's Ethics. Ancient Philosophy 8 (1):19-32.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. John Hare (1987). Aristotelian Justice and the Pull to Consensus. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 3 (3):37-49.
  30. John Hare (1987). Commentary on Timothy J. Brennan, “Academic Disciplines and Representative Advocacy”. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 6 (1):56-62.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. John P. Holdren, Paul Ehrlich, Anne Ehrlich, Gary Stahl, Berel Lang, Richard H. Popkin, Joseph Margolis, Patrick Morgan, John Hare, Russell Hardin, Richard A. Watson, Gregory S. Kavka, Jean Bethke Elshtain, Sidney Axinn, Terry Nardin, Douglas P. Lackey, Jefferson McMahan, Edmund Pellegrino, Stephen Toulmin, Dietrich Fischer, Edward F. McClennen, Louis Rene Beres, Arne Naess, Richard Falk & Milton Fisk (1986). Nuclear Weapons and the Future of Humanity: The Fundamental Questions. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. John E. Hare (1984). Law, Morality, and the Relations of States. Philosophical Books 25 (4):240-241.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. John E. Hare (1984). Philosophy in the Legislative Process. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 2 (2):81-88.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. John R. Clarke, John H. Sorenson & John E. Hare (1980). The Limits of Paternalism in Emergency Care. Hastings Center Report 10 (6):20-22.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation