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  1. Sarah Chan, John Harris & John Sulston (forthcoming). 1.4 Science and the Social Contract: On the Purposes, Uses and Abuses of Science. Common Knowledge: The Challenge of Transdisciplinarity.
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  2. John Harris (forthcoming). “. . . How Narrow the Strait!”. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics:1-14.
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  3. John Harris (forthcoming). Fhe Value o (Li (E. Bioethics: An Anthology.
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  4. Nicola J. Williams & John Harris (forthcoming). What is the Harm in Harmful Conception? On Threshold Harms in Non-Identity Cases. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics:1-15.
    Has the time come to put to bed the concept of a harm threshold when discussing the ethics of reproductive decision making and the legal limits that should be placed upon it? In this commentary, we defend the claim that there exist good moral reasons, despite the conclusions of the non-identity problem, based on the interests of those we might create, to refrain from bringing to birth individuals whose lives are often described in the philosophical literature as ‘less than worth (...)
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  5. John Harris (2014). Time to Exorcise the Cloning Demon. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 23 (1):53-62.
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  6. Alastair V. Campbell, Raanan Gillon, Julian Savulescu, John Harris, Soren Holm, H. Martyn Evans, David Greaves, Jane Macnaughton, Deborah Kirklin & Sue Eckstein (2013). The Journal of Medical Ethics and Medical Humanities: Offsprings of the London Medical Group. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (11):667-668.
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  7. John Harris (2013). 'Ethics is for Bad Guys!' Putting the 'Moral' Into Moral Enhancement. Bioethics 27 (3):169-173.
  8. John Harris (2013). Moral Progress and Moral Enhancement. Bioethics 27 (5):285-290.
  9. John Harris (2012). Can Kant's Three Formulations of the Categorical Imperative Be Unified? Southwest Philosophy Review 28 (2):91-94.
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  10. John Harris (2012). Stem Cell Research is of Ethical Significance for Three. In Stephen Holland (ed.), Arguing About Bioethics. Routledge. 42.
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  11. John Harris (2012). What It's Like to Be Good. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 21 (03):293-305.
    In this issue of CQ we introduce a new feature, in which noted bioethicists are invited to reflect on vital current issues. Our first invitee, John Harris, will subsequently assume editorship of this section.
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  12. John Richard Harris & Richard Galvin (2012). 'Pass the Cocoamone, Please': Causal Impotence, Opportunistic Vegetarianism and Act-Utilitarianism. Ethics, Policy and Environment 15 (3):368 - 383.
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  13. John P. Harris (2012). The Swan's Red-Dipped Foot: Euripides, Ion 161–9. Classical Quarterly 62 (02):510-522.
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  14. Sarah Chan & John Harris (2011). Does a Fish Need a Bicycle? Animals and Evolution in the Age of Biotechnology. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 20 (3):484-492.
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  15. Sarah Chan & John Harris (2011). Moral Enhancement and Pro-Social Behaviour. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (3):130-131.
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  16. Sarah Chan, Ying-Kiat Zee, Gordon Jayson & John Harris (2011). 'Risky' Research and Participants' Interests: The Ethics of Phase 2C Clinical Trials. Clinical Ethics 6 (2):91-96.
    Biomedical research involving human participants is highly regulated and subject to stringent ethical requirements. Clinical research ethics, regulation and policy have tended to focus almost exclusively on the protection of participants' interests against harms that might result from taking part in research. Less consideration, however, has been given to the interests that patients may themselves have in research participation, even in trials that may be beyond the bounds of current clinical research practice. In this paper, we consider the case of (...)
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  17. John Harris (2011). A pobreza das objecções à clonagem humana reprodutiva. Critica.
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  18. John Harris (2011). Moral Enhancement and Freedom. Bioethics 25 (2):102-111.
    This paper identifies human enhancement as one of the most significant areas of bioethical interest in the last twenty years. It discusses in more detail one area, namely moral enhancement, which is generating significant contemporary interest. The author argues that so far from being susceptible to new forms of high tech manipulation, either genetic, chemical, surgical or neurological, the only reliable methods of moral enhancement, either now or for the foreseeable future, are either those that have been in human and (...)
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  19. John Harris (2011). Sparrows, Hedgehogs and Castrati: Reflections on Gender and Enhancement. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (5):262-266.
    In a number of papers, including the one published in this journal, Robert Sparrow has mounted attacks on consequentialism using principally what he takes to be an important fact, which he believes constitutes a reductio ad absurdum of consequentialism in its many forms and of this author's approach to enhancement and disability in particular (see page 276). This fact is the current longer life expectancy of women when compared with men. Here the author argues that Sparrow's arguments and entire approach (...)
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  20. John Harris (2011). The Challenge of Nonconfrontational Ethics. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 20 (2):204-215.
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  21. John Harris (2011). Taking the “Human” Out of Human Rights. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 20 (1):9-20.
  22. John Harris (2010). Enhancements Are A Moral Obligation. In Julian Savulescu & Nick Bostrom (eds.), Human Enhancement. Oup Oxford.
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  23. John Harris (2010). Human Enhancement. The Philosophers' Magazine 50 (50):62-63.
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  24. John Harris (2010). Part IV: Bioethics and Beyond. Humanity and Hyper-Regulation : From Nuremberg to Helsinki / Onora O'Neill ; Transhumanity : A Moral Vision of the Twenty-First Century. In N. Ann Davis, Richard Keshen & Jeff McMahan (eds.), Ethics and Humanity: Themes From the Philosophy of Jonathan Glover. Oxford University Press.
     
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  25. John Harris (2010). The REMEDIE (Regenerative Medicine in Europe) Project. Dilemata 2.
    Interview made by Iñigo De Miguel, Bilbao, november 2009.
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  26. Sarah Chan & John Harris (2009). Consequentialism Without Consequences: Ethics and Embryo Research. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (01):61-.
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  27. Sarah Chan & John Harris (2009). Free Riders and Pious Sons – Why Science Research Remains Obligatory. Bioethics 23 (3):161-171.
    John Harris has previously proposed that there is a moral duty to participate in scientific research. This concept has recently been challenged by Iain Brassington, who asserts that the principles cited by Harris in support of the duty to research fail to establish its existence. In this paper we address these criticisms and provide new arguments for the existence of a moral obligation to research participation. This obligation, we argue, arises from two separate but related principles. The principle of fairness (...)
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  28. Miriam Cohen Christofidis, Roger Crisp, Avner de-Shalit, Simon Duffy, Ronald Dworkin, Alon Harel, John Harris, W. D. Hart, Dan Hausman & Richard Hull (2009). Jonathan Wolff. In Kimberley Brownlee & Adam Cureton (eds.), Disability and Disadvantage. Oxford University Press.
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  29. John Harris (2009). Obligation. In Julian Savulescu & Nick Bostrom (eds.), Human Enhancement. Oup Oxford. 26--131.
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  30. John Harris (2009). Transhumanity : A Moral Vision of the Twenty-First Century. In N. Ann Davis, Richard Keshen & Jeff McMahan (eds.), Ethics and Humanity: Themes From the Philosophy of Jonathan Glover. Oxford University Press.
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  31. John P. Harris (2009). Revenge of the Nerds: Xenophanes, Euripides, and Socrates Vs. Olympic Victors. American Journal of Philology 130 (2):157-194.
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  32. John Harris & Louise Irving (2009). Biobanking. In Bonnie Steinbock (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Bioethics. Oup Oxford.
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  33. Henry Greely, Barbara Sahakian, John Harris, Ronald Kessler, Gazzaniga C., Campbell Michael, Farah Philip & J. Martha (2008). Towards Responsible Use of Cognitive-Enhancing Drugs by the Healthy. Philosophical Explorations 456 (7223):702--705.
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  34. John Harris (2008). Comments on Joseph Palencik's “Cosmopolitanism and Identity. Southwest Philosophy Review 24 (2):1-4.
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  35. John Harris (2008). Global Norms, Informed Consensus and Hypocrisy in Bioethics. In Ronald M. Green, Aine Donovan & Steven A. Jauss (eds.), Global Bioethics: Issues of Conscience for the Twenty-First Century. Oup Oxford.
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  36. John M. Harris, Jeffry L. Hirst & Michael J. Mossinghoff (2008). Combinatorics and Graph Theory. Springer.
    This book covers a wide variety of topics in combinatorics and graph theory.
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  37. Muireann Quigley & John Harris (2008). Personal or Public Health?. In. In Michael Boylan (ed.), International Public Health Policy & Ethics. Dordrecht. 15--29.
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  38. Rebecca Bennett & John Harris (2007). Reproductive Choice. In Rosamond Rhodes, Leslie Francis & Anita Silvers (eds.), The Blackwell Guide to Medical Ethics. Blackwell Pub..
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  39. Sarah Chan & John Harris (2007). In Support of Human Enhancement. Studies in Ethics, Law, and Technology 1 (1).
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  40. Katrien Devolder & John Harris (2007). The Ambiguity of the Embryo: Ethical Inconsistency in the Human Embryonic Stem Cell Debate. Metaphilosophy 38 (2-3):153–169.
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  41. John Harris (2007). Enhancing Evolution: The Ethical Case for Making Better People. Princeton University Press.
    In Enhancing Evolution, leading bioethicist John Harris dismantles objections to genetic engineering, stem-cell research, designer babies, and cloning and makes an ethical case for biotechnology that is both forthright and rigorous.
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  42. John Harris (2007). The Method in Bioethics Research. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16 (04):366-.
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  43. Lisa Bortolotti & John Harris (2006). Disability, Enhancement and the Harm -Benefit Continuum. In John R. Spencer & Antje Du Bois-Pedain (eds.), Freedom and Responsibility in Reproductive Choice. Hart Publishers.
    Suppose that you are soon to be a parent and you learn that there are some simple measures that you can take to make sure that your child will be healthy. In particular, suppose that by following the doctor’s advice, you can prevent your child from having a disability, you can make your child immune from a number of dangerous diseases and you can even enhance its future intelligence. All that is required for this to happen is that you (or (...)
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  44. John Harris (2006). Stem Cells, Sex and Procreation In: KUHSE, Helga & SINGER, Peter. Bioethics–an Anthology 2.
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  45. Lisa Bortolotti & John Harris (2005). Stem Cell Research, Personhood and Sentience. Reproductive Biomedicine Online 10:68-75.
    In this paper the permissibility of stem cell research on early human embryos is defended. It is argued that, in order to have moral status, an individual must have an interest in its own wellbeing. Sentience is a prerequisite for having an interest in avoiding pain, and personhood is a prerequisite for having an interest in the continuation of one's own existence. Early human embryos are not sentient and therefore they are not recipients of direct moral consideration. Early human embryos (...)
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  46. Lisa Bortolotti & John Harris (2005). Embryos and Eagles: Symbolic Value in Research and Reproduction. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 15 (01):22-34.
    On both sides of the debate on the use of embryos in stem cell research, and in reproductive technologies more generally, rhetoric and symbolic images have been evoked to influence public opinion. Human embryos themselves are described as either “very small human beings” or “small clusters of cells.” The intentions behind the use of these phrases are clear. One description suggests that embryos are already members of our community and share with us a right to life or at least respectful (...)
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  47. Katrien Devolder & John Harris (2005). Compromise and Moral Complicity in the Embryonic Stem Cell Debate. In Nafsika Athanassoulis (ed.), Philosophical Reflections on Medical Ethics. Palgrave Macmillan.
     
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  48. Simona Giordano, Kenneth Gundle, John Harris, Anne Hunsaker Hawkins, Matti Häyry, Kenneth V. Iserson, Greg Loeben, Terrance McConnell & Ann E. Mills (2005). Walt Davis, MD, MA, is Assistant Professor, Director of Graduate Education and a Member of the University of Virginia's Clinical Ethics Service, at the Center for Biomedical Ethics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia. Raanon Gillon, MD, is the Former Editor of the Journal of Medical Ethics and Emeritus Professor of Medical Ethics, Imperial College, London, England. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 14:1-2.
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  49. Simona Giordano & John Harris (2005). 18 What is Gender Equality in Sports? In Claudio Marcello Tamburrini & Torbjörn Tännsjö (eds.), Genetic Technology and Sport: Ethical Questions. Routledge. 209.
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  50. John Harris (2005). The Age-Indifference Principle and Equality. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 14 (1):93-99.
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