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  1. John Hasnas (forthcoming). The Normative Theories of Business Ethics: A Guide for the Perplexed. Business Ethics Quarterly.
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  2. John Hasnas (2013). Is There a Moral Duty to Obey the Law? Social Philosophy and Policy 30 (1-2):450-479.
    This essay argues that there can be a duty to obey the law when it is produced by the evolutionary forces at work in the customary and common law. Human beings' inherent epistemic limitations mean that they must rely on the trial and error learning built into the common law process to discover rules that facilitate peaceful social interaction. Hence, a duty to obey the law produced by the common law process can arise from individuals' natural duty to promote social (...)
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  3. John Hasnas (2013). Teaching Business Ethics: The Principles Approach. Journal of Business Ethics Education 10:275-304.
  4. John Hasnas (2013). Whither Stakeholder Theory? A Guide for the Perplexed Revisited. Journal of Business Ethics 112 (1):47-57.
    The nature of stakeholder theory and its fundamental normative prescriptions are the subject of much confusion and academic debate. This article attempts to provide an account of both the fundamental normative implications of stakeholder theory and the theory’s range of application that both stakeholder advocates and critics can agree upon. Using exclusively the language of leading stakeholder theorists, the article identifies the essential prescriptions of the theory and the type of organizations to which stakeholder theory applies in the hope of (...)
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  5. John Hasnas (2012). Reflections on Corporate Moral Responsibility and the Problem Solving Technique of Alexander the Great. Journal of Business Ethics 107 (2):183-195.
    The academic debate over the propriety of attributing moral responsibility to corporations is decades old and ongoing. The conventional approach to this debate is to identify the sufficient conditions for moral agency and then attempt to determine whether corporations possess them. This article recommends abandoning the conventional approach in favor of an examination of the practical consequences of corporate moral responsibility. The article’s thesis is that such an examination reveals that attributing moral responsibility to corporations is ethically acceptable only if (...)
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  6. John Hasnas (2010). The Mirage of Product Safety. In George G. Brenkert & Tom L. Beauchamp (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Business Ethics. Oxford University Press.
     
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  7. John Hasnas, Robert Prentice & Alan Strudler (2010). New Directions in Legal Scholarship. Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (3):503-531.
    Legal scholars and business ethicists are interested in many of the same core issues regarding human and firm behavior. The vast amount of legal research being generated by nearly 10,000 law school and business law scholars will inevitably influence business ethics research. This paper describes some of the recent trends in legal scholarship and explores its implications for three significant aspects of business ethics research—methodology, theory, and policy.
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  8. John Hasnas (2009). Two Theories of Environmental Regulation. Social Philosophy and Policy 26 (2):95-129.
    The over-exploitation of commonly-held resources is typically analyzed as an instance of market failure that calls for legislation to internalize the social costs that private activities impose on the environment. In this article, I argue that to the extent that this analysis ignores the regulatory effect of the common law, it is unsound. In The Tragedy of the Commons, Garret Hardin points out that there are two solutions to the tragedy: privatize the resource or restrict access to it. Environmental legislation (...)
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  9. John Hasnas (2009). Up From Flatland. Business Ethics Quarterly 17 (3):399-426.
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  10. John Hasnas (2007). Up From Flatland: Business Ethics in the Age of Divergence. Business Ethics Quarterly 17 (3):399-426.
    Abstract: The corporate scandals of the past few years have brought renewed attention to the problem of curtailing dishonest and fraudulent business practices, a problem on which strategic, ethical, and law enforcement interests should be aligned. Unfortunately, several features of federal criminal law and federal law enforcement policy have driven a wedge into this alignment, forcing managers to choose between their ethical obligations and their obligation to obey the law or aid law enforcement. In this article, I examine the nature (...)
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  11. John Hasnas (2005). Toward a Theory of Empirical Natural Rights. Social Philosophy and Policy 22 (1):111-147.
    Natural rights theorists such as John Locke and Robert Nozick provide arguments for limited government that are grounded on the individual's possession of natural rights to life, liberty, and property. Resting on natural rights, such arguments can be no more persuasive than the underlying arguments for the existence of such rights, which are notoriously weak. In this article, John Hasnas offers an alternative conception of natural rights, “empirical natural rights,” that are not beset by the objections typically raised against traditional (...)
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  12. John Hasnas (2003). Reflections on the Minimal State. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 2 (1):115-128.
    This article challenges the traditional argument for the state that holds that because the market is unable to supply the rule-making, adjudicative, and enforcement services that are essential to life in society, the state must, and hence is morally justified. The author argues that the market's inability to supply these basic services proves only that the state must ensure that they are supplied, not that it must supply them itself. This implies that the traditional concept of the minimal state as (...)
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  13. John Hasnas (1998). The Normative Theories of Business Ethics. Business Ethics Quarterly 8 (1):19-42.
    The three leading normative theories of business ethics are the stockholder theory, the stakeholder theory, and the social contracttheory. Currently, the stockholder theory is somewhat out of favor with many members of the business ethics community. Thestakeholder theory, in contrast, is widely accepted, and the social contract theory appears to be gaining increasing adherents. In thisarticle, I undertake a critical review of the supporting arguments for each of the theories, and argue that the stockholder theory is neitheras outdated nor as (...)
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  14. John Hasnas (1995). Are There Derivative Natural Rights? Public Affairs Quarterly 9 (3):215-232.
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