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  1. John Hyman, Three Fallacies About Action.
    in Proceedings of the 29th International Wittgenstein Symposium, Hölder-Pichler-Tempsky.
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  2. John Hyman, John Hyman.
    I read Ernst Gombrich’s wonderful book Art and Illusion in 1981. I’d completed my BA a few months earlier, and I was spending a year in Geneva on a scholarship, before returning to Oxford to begin the BPhil. The topic in philosophy that interested me most at that time was perception, and I was struck by the extent to which Gombrich’s arguments relied on views about visual perception that he had inherited from the Helmholtzian tradition in psychology, and therefore indirectly (...)
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  3. John Hyman, Art and Neuroscience.
    1. I want to discuss a new area of scientific research called neuro-aesthetics, which is the study of art by neuroscientists. The most prominent champions of neuroaesthetics are V.S. Ramachandran and Semir Zeki, both of whom have both made ambitious claims about their work. Ramachandran says boldly that he has discovered “the key to understanding what art really is”, and that his theory of art can be tested by brain imaging experiments, although he does not describe these experiments, or explain (...)
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  4. John Hyman, The Road to Larissarati_475 393..414.
    In the Meno, Socrates asks why knowledge is a better guide to acting the right way than true belief. The answer he proposes is ingenious, but it fails to solve the puzzle, and some recent attempts to solve it also fail. I shall argue that the puzzle cannot be solved as long as we conceive of knowledge as a kind of belief, or allow our conception of knowledge to be governed by the contrast between knowledge and belief.
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  5. John Hyman (2014). Acts and Intentions. Think 13 (36):11-22.
    What is the difference between the changes in your body that you yourself cause personally, such as the movements of your legs when you walk, or your lips when you speak, and the ones you do not cause personally, such as the contraction of your heart, or your foot bobbing up and down when your legs are crossed? Since the seventeenth century, most philosophers have said that will or intention makes the difference. I reject this answer and propose an alternative (...)
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  6. John Hyman (2014). Desires, Dispositions and Deviant Causal Chains. Philosophy 89 (1):83-112.
    Recent work on dispositions offers a new solution to the long-running dispute about whether explanations of intentional action are causal explanations. The dispute seemed intractable because of a lack of percipience about dispositions and a commitment to Humean orthodoxies about causation on both sides.
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  7. John Hyman (2014). The Most General Factive Stative Attitude. Analysis:anu083.
    I discuss Timothy Willliamson’s conjecture that ‘knowing is the most general factive stative attitude, that which one has to a proposition if one has any factive stative attitude to it at all’.
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  8. John Hyman (2013). Voluntariness and Choice. Philosophical Quarterly 63 (253):683-708.
    Philosophers have shown little interest in the concept of voluntariness during the last fifty years, mainly because Anscombe's book Intention persuaded us that it plays a relatively minor role in thought about human action, compared to the concept of acting intentionally or acting for a reason, and does not raise any interesting problems of its own, once the nature of intentional action has been explained. But this seems to be wrong. The nature of voluntariness, and its relationship with guilt, coercion, (...)
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  9. John Hyman (2012). Depiction. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 71:129-150.
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  10. John Hyman (2011). Acting for Reasons: Reply to Dancy. [REVIEW] Frontiers of Philosophy in China 6 (3):358-368.
    This paper argues that we need to distinguish between two different ideas of a reason: first, the idea of a premise or assumption, from which a person’s action or deliberation can proceed; second, the idea of a fact by which a person can be guided, when he modifies his thought or behaviour in some way. It argues further that if we have the first idea in mind, one can act for the reason that p regardless of whether it is the (...)
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  11. John Hyman (2011). Review of Catharine Abell, Katerina Bantinaki (Eds.), Philosophical Perspectives on Depiction. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2011 (2).
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  12. John Hyman (2011). Wittgenstein on Action and the Will. In Oskari Kuusela & Marie McGinn (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Wittgenstein. Oup Oxford.
  13. John Hyman (2010). The Road to Larissa. Ratio 23 (4):393-414.
    In the Meno, Socrates asks why knowledge is a better guide to acting the right way than true belief. The answer he proposes is ingenious, but it fails to solve the puzzle, and some recent attempts to solve it also fail. I shall argue that the puzzle cannot be solved as long as we conceive of knowledge as a kind of belief, or allow our conception of knowledge to be governed by the contrast between knowledge and belief.
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  14. John Hyman (2010). The Tree of Knowledge. Think 9 (25):9-17.
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  15. Hans-Johann Glock & John Hyman (eds.) (2009). Wittgenstein and Analytic Philosophy: Essays for P. M. S. Hacker. OUP Oxford.
    Peter Hacker is one of the most notable interpreters of Wittgenstein's work, a powerful and sophisticated exponent of Wittgensteinian ideas, and a distinguished historian of the analytic tradition. Thirteen leading philosophers and Wittgenstein scholars offer specially written essays in honour of Hacker. Their contributions deal with a variety of themes associated with Wittgenstein. Some deal with issues of Wittgenstein scholarship and interpretation, including areas that have attracted an increasing amount of attention, such as ethics and religion. Others deal with central (...)
     
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  16. P. M. S. Hacker, Hans-Johann Glock & John Hyman (eds.) (2009). Wittgenstein and Analytic Philosophy: Essays for P.M.S. Hacker. Oxford University Press.
    Thirteen leading contributors offer new essays in honour of the eminent philosopher and Wittgenstein scholar Peter Hacker.
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  17. P. M. S. Hacker, Hans-Johann Glock & John Hyman (eds.) (2009). Wittgenstein and Analytic Philosophy: Essays for P. Oxford University Press.
     
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  18. John Hyman (2007). Depicting Colours: Reply to Newall. Philosophical Quarterly 57 (229):674–678.
    In a recent paper in this journal, 'Pictures, Colour and Resemblance', Michael Newall criticizes my views about how colours are depicted. In this reply, I set out my views and then discuss Newall's criticism of them.
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  19. John Hyman (2006). Knowledge and Evidence. Mind 115 (460):891-916.
    theory of knowledge defended in Timothy Williamson's book Knowledge and its Limits is compared here with the theory defended in the author's articles ‘How Knowledge Works’ and ‘Knowledge and Self-Knowledge’. It is argued that there are affinities between these theories, but that the latter has considerably more explanatory power.
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  20. John Hyman (2006). Reply to Wyller. Philosophy 81 (317):531-534.
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  21. John Hyman (2006). The Objective Eye. University of Chicago Press.
    The questions tackled here are fundamental ones: Is our experience of color an illusion? How does the metaphysical status of colors differ from that of shapes?
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  22. John Hyman (2005). Ii *-Realism and Relativism in the Theory of Art. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 105 (1):25-53.
    Pluralism—the incommensurability and, at times, incompatibility of objective ends—is not relativism, nor, a fortiori, subjectivism, nor the allegedly unbridgeable differences of emotional attitude on which some modern positivists, emotivists, existentialists, nationalists and, indeed, relativistic sociologists and anthropologists found their accounts.
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  23. John Hyman (2005). What, If Anything, Are Colours Relative To? Philosophy 80 (4):475-494.
    The questions considered are whether colours are relative to systems of colour concepts, to the conditions in which they are observed, or to observers or communities of observers; and whether the relativity of colours, such as it is, implies that they are less real than shapes or intervals in time. The argument is based on the thought that Special Relativity provides the best available intellectual framework for thinking about the supposed relativity of qualities of physical things.
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  24. John Hyman (2004). Realism and Relativism in the Theory of Art. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 105 (1):25–53.
    Pluralism—the incommensurability and, at times, incompatibility of objective ends—is not relativism, nor, a fortiori, subjectivism, nor the allegedly unbridgeable differences of emotional attitude on which some modern positivists, emotivists, existentialists, nationalists and, indeed, relativistic sociologists and anthropologists found their accounts.
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  25. John Hyman & Helen Steward (2004). Preface. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 55.
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  26. John Hyman (2003). Pains and Places. Philosophy 78 (303):5-24.
    I argue that itches, tickles, aches and pains—sensations of all sorts—are generally in the places where we say they are. So, for example, if I say that I have an itch in the big toe on my left foot, then, by and large, that is the very place where the itch is. James denied this in the 1890s; Russell and Broad denied it in the 1920s; Wittgenstein and Ryle denied it in the 1940s; Lewis and Armstrong denied it in the (...)
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  27. John Hyman (2003). Strawson and Kant. Oxford: Clarendon Press.
  28. John Hyman (2003). Subjectivism in the Theory of Pictorial Art. The Monist 86 (4):676 - 701.
    1. A new wave of subjectivism in the theory of pictorial art began around forty years ago; and since then it has gathered pace in tandem with changing fashions in the philosophy of mind. The initial impetus was provided by the publication of Ernst Gombrich’s 1956 Mellon Lectures, Art and Illusion.1 In this book, and in many subsequent articles and lectures which elaborate its theme, Gombrich argues that the development of Western art – essentially the art of ancient Greece and (...)
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  29. John Hyman (2003). The Evidence of Our Senses. In Hans-Johann Glock (ed.), Strawson and Kant. Oxford: Clarendon Press.
    The modern causal theory of perception—the theory defended by Grice and Strawson—differs from the classical theory advanced by Descartes and Locke in two ways. First, the modern theory is an exercise in conceptual analysis. Secondly, it is a version of what is sometimes called direct realism. I shall comment on these points in turn.
     
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  30. John Hyman (2002). Is Beauty in the Eye of the Beholder? Think 1 (1):81-92.
    In this article, John Hyman argues that beauty does not consist in mathematical perfection; that Hume was mistaken in claiming that beauty exists only in the mind; that we can discover what is really beautiful by learning to give reasons for our preferences; and that some things in the world are beautiful—probably many more than we imagine.
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  31. John Hyman (2001). -Ings and -Ers. Ratio 14 (4):298–317.
    This paper is about the semantic structure of verbal and deverbal noun phrases. The focus is on noun phrases which describe actions, perceptions, sensations and beliefs. It is commonly thought that actions are movements of parts of the agent’s body which we typically describe in terms of their effects, and that perceptions are slices of sensible experience which we typically describe in terms of their causes. And many philosophers hold that sensations and beliefs are states of the central nervous system (...)
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  32. John Hyman (2001). 'The Urn and the Chamber Pot. In Richard Allen & Malcolm Turvey (eds.), Wittgenstein, Theory, and the Arts. Routledge. 137.
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  33. John Hyman (1999). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 39 (2):195-198.
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  34. John Hyman (1999). How Knowledge Works. Philosophical Quarterly 50 (197):433-451.
    I shall be mainly concerned with the question ‘What is personal propositional knowledge?’. This question is obviously quite narrowly focused, in three respects. In the first place, there is impersonal as well as personal knowledge. Second, a distinction is often drawn between propositional knowledge and practical knowledge. And third, as well as asking what knowledge is, it is also possible to ask whether and how knowledge of various kinds can be acquired: causal knowledge, a priori knowledge, moral knowledge, and so (...)
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  35. Maria Alvarez & John Hyman (1998). Agents and Their Actions. Philosophy 73 (2):219-245.
    In the past thirty years or so, the doctrine that actions are events has become an essential, and sometimes unargued, part of the received view in the philosophy of action, despite the efforts of a few philosophers to undermine the consensus. For example, the entry for Agency in a recently published reference guide to the philosophy of mind begins with the following sentence: A central task in the philosophy of action is that of spelling out the differences between events in (...)
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  36. John Hyman (1998). El Evangelio según Wittgenstein. Revista de Filosofia 19:231-244.
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  37. John Hyman (1997). Words and Pictures. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 42:51-.
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  38. Hanjo Glock & John Hyman (1994). Persons and Their Bodies. Philosophical Investigations 17 (2):365-379.
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  39. John Hyman (1994). Reply to Vision. Philosophical Quarterly 44 (176):369-376.
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  40. John Hyman (1994). Vision and Power. Journal of Philosophy 91 (5):236-252.
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  41. John Hyman (1993). Vision, Causation and Occlusion. Philosophical Quarterly 44 (171):210-214.
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  42. John Hyman (1993). Prediction and Predication. Ratio 6 (1):27-35.
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  43. John Hyman (1992). The Causal Theory of Perception. Philosophical Quarterly 42 (168):277-296.
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  44. John Hyman (1989). The Imitation of Nature. Blackwell.
     
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  45. John Hyman (1986). The Cartesian Theory of Vision. Ratio 28 (December):149-167.
     
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