1. John J. Joughin & Simon Malpas (eds.) (2003). The New Aestheticism. Manchester University Press.
    The rise of literary theory spawned the rise of anti-aestheticism, so that even for cultural theorists, discussions concerning aesthetics were often carried out in a critical shorthand that failed to engage with the particularity of the work of art, much less the specificities of aesthetic experience. This book introduces the notion of a new aestheticism--"new" insofar as it identifies a turn taken by a number of important contemporary thinkers towards the idea that focussing on the specifically aesthetic impact of a (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Scott Brewster, John J. Joughin, David Owen & Richard J. Walker, Inhuman Reflections: Thinking the Limits of the Human.
    This text asks what it is to be human. Spectres, cyborgs, clones, aliens - contemporary representations of the inhuman hybrid seem more various, multiform and pressing than ever before. Increasingly the blurred distinction between human and inhuman and the attendant technisation of social life raises a series of opportunities for cultural analysis: both in terms of its current transformative refiguration of body and self and in relation to the narratives, networks and communities within which these new identities are redeployed and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. John J. Joughin (2000). Philosophical Shakespeares. Routledge.
    Shakespeare continues to articulate the central problems of our intellectual inheritance. The plays of a Renaissance playwright still seem to be fundamental to our understanding and experience of modernity. Key philosophical questions concerning value, meaning and justice continue to resonate in Shakespeare's work. In the course of rethinking these issues, Philosophical Shakespeares focuses on and encourages the growing dissolution of boundaries between literature and philosophy. Philosophical Shakespeares includes contributions from the first rank of contemporary criticism, drawing together original and previously (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation