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John Kadvany [13]John David Kadvany [2]
  1. John David Kadvany (2001). Imre Lakatos and the Guises of Reason. Duke University Press.
    The Hungarian émigré Imre Lakatos earned a worldwide reputation through the influential philosophy of science debates involving Thomas Kuhn, Paul Feyerabend, and Sir Karl Popper. In _Imre Lakatos and the Guises of Reason_ John Kadvany shows that embedded in Lakatos’s English-language work is a remarkable historical philosophy rooted in his Hungarian past. Below the surface of his life as an Anglo-American philosopher of science and mathematics, Lakatos covertly introduced novel transformations of Hegelian and Marxist ideas about historiography, skepticism, criticism, and (...)
     
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  2.  31
    John Kadvany (2007). Positional Value and Linguistic Recursion. Journal of Indian Philosophy 35 (5-6):487-520.
  3.  2
    John Kadvany (forthcoming). Pāṇini's Grammar and Modern Computation. History and Philosophy of Logic:1-22.
    Pāṇini's fourth century BC Sanskrit grammar uses rewrite rules utilizing an explicit formal language defined through a semi-formal metalanguage. The grammar is generative, meaning that it is capable of expressing a potential infinity of well-formed Sanskrit sentences starting from a finite symbolic inventory. The grammar's operational rules involve extensive use of auxiliary markers, in the form of Sanskrit phonemes, to control grammatical derivations. Pāṇini's rules often utilize a generic context-sensitive format to identify terms used in replacement, modification or deletion operations. (...)
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  4.  53
    John Kadvany (2003). Letters. Philosophia Mathematica 11 (3):364-364.
    A brief correction to a review of my book Imre Lakatos and the Guises of Reason published in Philosophia Mathematica, regarding the role of George Polya's notion of heuristic in Lakatos' Proofs and Refutations.
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  5.  39
    John Kadvany (1997). Varieties of Risk Representations. Journal of Social Philosophy 28 (3):123-143.
    An approach to describing risk analysis, risk perception and risk interpretation under a single umbrella starting with a general definition of risk as "adverse consequences under uncertainty." The idea of risk representation is introduced as an omnibus term for many different ways of conceptualizing risk and deploying risk messages in science, government or society.
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  6. John Kadvany (1989). Reflections on the Legacy of Kurt Godel: Mathematics, Skepticism, Postmodernism. Philosophical Forum 20 (3):161-181.
     
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  7.  39
    John Kadvany (2008). Review of Alain Badiou, Number and Numbers. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (10).
    This review takes seriously Badiou's use of set theory and mathematics, explaining the book's subtle technical content while maintaining a critical distance on Badiou's interpretative views.
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  8.  30
    John Kadvany (1996). Reason in History: Paul Feyerabend's Autobiography. Inquiry 39 (1):141 – 146.
    This review was prompted by the publication of Paul Feyerabend's autobiography Killing Time, just following his sudden death in 1994.
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  9.  3
    John Kadvany (1989). A Mathematical Bildungsroman. History and Theory 28 (1):25-42.
    In his philosophical history of nineteenth-century mathematics, Proofs and Persuasions: The Logic of Mathematical Discovery, Imre Lakatos asserts that mathematical criticism was the driving force in the growth of mathematical knowledge during the nineteenth century, and provided the impetus for some of the deepest conceptual reformulations of the century. The philosophy of mathematics represented by Proofs and Refutations also presents a rich analysis of how mathematics can be thought of as an essentially historical discipline. Despite protestations by Lakatos that he (...)
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  10.  20
    John Kadvany (2010). Indistinguishable From Magic: Computation is Cognitive Technology. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 20 (1):119-143.
    This paper explains how mathematical computation can be constructed from weaker recursive patterns typical of natural languages. A thought experiment is used to describe the formalization of computational rules, or arithmetical axioms, using only orally-based natural language capabilities, and motivated by two accomplishments of ancient Indian mathematics and linguistics. One accomplishment is the expression of positional value using versified Sanskrit number words in addition to orthodox inscribed numerals. The second is Pāṇini’s invention, around the fifth century BCE, of a formal (...)
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  11.  11
    John Kadvany (2010). Indistinguishable From Magic: Computation is Cognitive Technology. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 20 (1):119-143.
    Abstract This paper explains how mathematical computation can be constructed from weaker recursive patterns typical of natural languages. A thought experiment is used to describe the formalization of computational rules, or arithmetical axioms, using only orally-based natural language capabilities, and motivated by two accomplishments of ancient Indian mathematics and linguistics. One accomplishment is the expression of positional value using versified Sanskrit number words in addition to orthodox inscribed numerals. The second is Panini’s invention, around<br>the fifth century BCE, of a formal (...)
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  12.  6
    John Kadvany (1991). Dialectic and Diagonalization. Inquiry 34 (1):3 – 25.
    This essay is about mathematics as a written or literate language. Through historical and anthropological observations drawn from the history of Greek mathematics and the oral tradition preceding the rise of literacy in Greece, as well as considerations on the nature of alphabetic writing, it is argued that three essential linguistic features of mathematical discourse are jointly possible only through written, alphabetic language. The essay concludes with a discussion of how both alphabetic principles and issues related to literacy faced by (...)
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  13. John Kadvany (2001). Imre Lakatos and the Guises of Reason. Duke University Press.
    The Hungarian émigré Imre Lakatos earned a worldwide reputation through the influential philosophy of science debates involving Thomas Kuhn, Paul Feyerabend, and Sir Karl Popper. In _Imre Lakatos and the Guises of Reason_ John Kadvany shows that embedded in Lakatos’s English-language work is a remarkable historical philosophy rooted in his Hungarian past. Below the surface of his life as an Anglo-American philosopher of science and mathematics, Lakatos covertly introduced novel transformations of Hegelian and Marxist ideas about historiography, skepticism, criticism, and (...)
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  14. John Kadvany (1995). The Mathematical Present as History. Philosophical Forum 26 (4):263-287.
     
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