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  1. John Lyne & Carolyn R. Miller (2009). Rhetoric Across the Disciplines: Rhetoric, Disciplinary, and Fields of Knowledge. In A. Lunsford, K. Wilson & R. Eberly (eds.), Sage Handbook of Rhetorical Studies. Sage. 167--74.
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  2. John Lyne (2001). Contours of Intervention: How Rhetoric Matters to Biomedicine. Journal of Medical Humanities 22 (1):3-13.
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  3. John Lyne (1994). Social Epistemology as a Rhetoric of Inquiry. Argumentation 8 (2):111-124.
    Fuller's program of social epistemology engages a rhetoric of inquiry that can be usefully compared and contrasted with other discursive theories of knowledge, such as that of Richard Rorty. Resisting the model of “conversation,” Fuller strikes an activist posture and lays the groundwork for normative “knowledge policy,” in which persuasion and credibility play key roles. The image of investigation is one that overtly rejects the “storehouse” conception of knowledge and invokes the metaphors of distributive economics. Productive questions arise as to (...)
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  4. Henry Howe & John Lyne (1992). Gene Talk in Sociobiology. Social Epistemology 6 (2):109 – 163.
    Abstract Terminology within the biological sciences gets its import not just from semantic meaning, but also from the way it functions within the rhetorics of the various disciplinary practices. The ?sociobiology? of human behavior inherits three distinct rhetorics from the genetic disciplines. Sociobiologists use population genetic, biometrical genetic, and molecular genetic rhetorics, without acknowledging the conceptual and experimental constraints that are assumed by geneticists. The eclectic blending of these three rhetorics obscures important differences of context and meaning. Sociobiologists use foundational (...)
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  5. Henry Howe & John Lyne (1992). Howe and Lyne Bully the Critics. Social Epistemology 6 (2):231 – 240.
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  6. John Lyne (1990). Idealism as a Rhetorical Stance. In Richard A. Cherwitz (ed.), Rhetoric and Philosophy. L. Erlbaum Associates. 149--86.
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