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  1. John M. Connolly (2009). Eudaimonism, Teleology, and the Pursuit of Happiness. Faith and Philosophy 26 (3):274-296.
    Recent interest among both philosophers and the wider public in the tradition of virtue ethics often takes its inspiration from Aristotle or from Thomas Aquinas. In this essay I briefly outline the ethical approaches of these two towering figures, and then describe more fully the virtue ethics of Meister Eckhart, a medieval thinker who admired, though critically, both Aristotle and Aquinas. His related but distinctively original approach to the virtuous life is marked by a striking and seemingly paradoxical injunction to (...)
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  2. John M. Connolly (2007). Das Problem der Willensschwäche in der Mittelalterlichen Philosophie / the Problem of Weakness of Will in Medieval Philosophy [Recherches de Théologie Et Philosophie Médiévales, Bibliotheca 8]. Review of Metaphysics 60 (4):865-866.
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  3. John M. Connolly (1993). Anomaly and Folk Psychology. Inquiry 36 (1 & 2):179 – 198.
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  4. John M. Connolly (1991). Whither Action Theory. Journal of Philosophical Research 16:85-106.
    The problem of ‘wayward causal chains’ threatens any causal analysis of the concept of intentional human action. For such chains show that the mere causation of an action by the right sort of belief and/or desire does not make the action intentional, i.e. one done in order to attain the object of desire. Now if the ‘because’ in ‘wayward’ action-explanations is straightforwardly causal, that might be argued to indicate by contrast that the different ‘because’ of reasons-explanations (which both explain and (...)
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  5. John M. Connolly (1987). The Will as Impression. Hume Studies 13 (2):276-305.
  6. John M. Connolly & Thomas Keutner (1987). David Hume and the Concept of Volition. Hume Studies 13 (2):275-275.
  7. John M. Connolly & Thomas Keutner (1987). Introduction. Hume Studies 13 (2):275-275.
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  8. John M. Connolly (1986). Gadamer and the Author's Authority: A Language-Game Approach. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 44 (3):271-277.
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  9. John M. Connolly (1979). II. Praxis and Intention. Inquiry 22 (1-4):366-378.
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  10. John M. Connolly (1976). A Dialectical Approach to Action Theory. Inquiry 19 (1-4):427 – 442.
    Recent work in the theory of action by analytical philosophers has focused on explaining actions by citing the agent's motivating reason(s). But this ignores a pattern of explanation typical in the social sciences, i.e. situating the agent in a reference group whose members typically manifest that behavior. In some cases the behavior of such groups can itself be shown to be the product of social forces. Two extended examples of this explanatory pattern are studied. In each case the motivating reasons (...)
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