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  1. Tim W. Fawcett, Benja Fallenstein, Andrew D. Higginson, Alasdair I. Houston, Dave E. W. Mallpress, Pete C. Trimmer & John M. McNamara (2014). The Evolution of Decision Rules in Complex Environments. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 18 (3):153-161.
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  2. Alasdair I. Houston & John M. McNamara (2005). John Maynard Smith and the Importance of Consistency in Evolutionary Game Theory. Biology and Philosophy 20 (5):933-950.
    John Maynard Smith was the founder of evolutionary game theory. He has also been the major influence on the direction of this field, which now pervades behavioural ecology and evolutionary biology. In its original formulation the theory had three components: a set of strategies, a payoff structure, and a concept of evolutionary stability. These three key components are still the basis of the theory, but what is assumed about each component is often different to the original assumptions. We review modern (...)
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  3. Alasdair I. Houston & John M. McNamara (2000). Adaptive Accounts of Physiology and Emotion. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (2):201-202.
    Rolls discusses various adaptive explanations of physiological processes and the emotions. We give a critical analysis of some of these from the perspective of behavioural ecology. While agreeing with the approach adopted by Rolls, we identify topics that could have been better presented by making use of the existing literature.
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  4. John M. McNamara (1993). State-Dependent Life-History Equations. Acta Biotheoretica 41 (3).
    Matrix population models provide a natural tool to analyse state-dependent life-history strategies. Reproductive value and the intrinsic rate of natural increase under a strategy, and the optimal life-history strategy can all be easily characterised using projection matrices. The resultant formulae, however, are not directly comparable with the corresponding formulae for age structured populations such as Lotka's equations and Fisher's formula for reproductive value. This is because formulae involving projection matrices lose track of what happens to an individual over its lifetime (...)
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  5. Alasdair I. Houston & John M. McNamara (1991). The Next State of the Art. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (1):100.
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  6. John M. McNamara & Alasdair I. Houston (1990). The Value of Fat Reserves and the Tradeoff Between Starvation and Predation. Acta Biotheoretica 38 (1).
    It is shown that in a range of models, the probability that a forager dies from starvation is, to a good approximation, an exponential function of energy reserves. Using a time and energy budget for a 19g passerine, we explore the consequences, in terms of starvation and predation, of various levels of energy reserves. It is shown that there exists an optimal level L of reserves at which total mortality (starvation plus predation) is minimized. L increases when the environment deteriorates (...)
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  7. Alasdair I. Houston & John M. McNamara (1988). A Framework for the Functional Analysis of Behaviour. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):117.
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  8. Alasdair I. Houston & John M. McNamara (1988). In Delay There Lies No Plenty. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):686.
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  9. Alasdair I. Houston & John M. McNamara (1988). There's No Such Thing as a Free Lunch. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):154.
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  10. John M. McNamara & Alasdair I. Houston (1987). A General Framework for Understanding the Effects of Variability and Interruptions on Foraging Behaviour. Acta Biotheoretica 36 (1).
    A general framework for analysing the effects of variability and the effects of interruptions on foraging is presented. The animal is characterised by its level of energetic reserves, x. We consider behaviour over a period of time [0,T]. A terminal reward function R(x) determines the expected future reproductive success of an animal with reserves x at time T. For any state x at a time in the period, we give the animal a choice between various options and then constrain it (...)
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