Search results for 'John M. Mikhail' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. John M. Mikhail (2011). Elements of Moral Cognition: Rawls' Linguistic Analogy and the Cognitive Science of Moral and Legal Judgment. Cambridge University Press.score: 1230.0
    Is the science of moral cognition usefully modeled on aspects of Universal Grammar? Are human beings born with an innate "moral grammar" that causes them to analyze human action in terms of its moral structure, with just as little awareness as they analyze human speech in terms of its grammatical structure? Questions like these have been at the forefront of moral psychology ever since John Mikhail revived them in his influential work on the linguistic analogy and its implications (...)
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  2. John M. Mikhail (2000). Rawls' Linguistic Analogy. Dissertation, Cornell Universityscore: 870.0
  3. John Mikhail, Scottish Common Sense and Nineteenth-Century American Law: A Critical Appraisal.score: 300.0
    In her insightful and stimulating article, The Mind of a Moral Agent, Professor Susanna Blumenthal traces the influence of Scottish Common Sense philosophy on early American law. Among other things, Blumenthal argues that the basic model of moral agency upon which early American jurists relied, which drew heavily from Common Sense philosophers like Thomas Reid, generated certain paradoxical conclusions about legal responsibility that later generations were forced to confront. "Having cast their lot with the Common Sense philosophers in the "formative (...)
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  4. John Mikhail (2007). Universal Moral Grammar: Theory, Evidence, and the Future. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (4):143 –152.score: 240.0
    Scientists from various disciplines have begun to focus attention on the psychology and biology of human morality. One research program that has recently gained attention is universal moral grammar (UMG). UMG seeks to describe the nature and origin of moral knowledge by using concepts and models similar to those used in Chomsky's program in linguistics. This approach is thought to provide a fruitful perspective from which to investigate moral competence from computational, ontogenetic, behavioral, physiological and phylogenetic perspectives. In this article, (...)
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  5. John Mikhail, A Case for the Moral Organ?score: 240.0
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  6. Marc Hauser, Fiery Cushman, Liane Young, J. I. N. Kang-Xing & John Mikhail (2007). A Dissociation Between Moral Judgments and Justifications. Mind and Language 22 (1):1–21.score: 240.0
    To what extent do moral judgments depend on conscious reasoning from explicitly understood principles? We address this question by investigating one particular moral principle, the principle of the double effect. Using web-based technology, we collected a large data set on individuals' responses to a series of moral dilemmas, asking when harm to innocent others is permissible. Each moral dilemma presented a choice between action and inaction, both resulting in lives saved and lives lost. Results showed that: (1) patterns of moral (...)
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  7. John Mikhail (2009). Moral Grammar and Intuitive Jurisprudence: A Formal Model of Unconscious Moral and Legal Knowledge. In B. H. Ross, D. M. Bartels, C. W. Bauman, L. J. Skitka & D. L. Medin (eds.), Psychology of Learning and Motivation, Vol. 50: Moral Judgment and Decision Making. Academic Press.score: 240.0
    Could a computer be programmed to make moral judgments about cases of intentional harm and unreasonable risk that match those judgments people already make intuitively? If the human moral sense is an unconscious computational mechanism of some sort, as many cognitive scientists have suggested, then the answer should be yes. So too if the search for reflective equilibrium is a sound enterprise, since achieving this state of affairs requires demarcating a set of considered judgments, stating them as explanandum sentences, and (...)
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  8. John Mikhail (2011). Emotion, Neuroscience, and Law: A Comment on Darwin and Greene. Emotion Review 3 (3):293-295.score: 240.0
    Darwin’s (1871/1981) observation that evolution has produced in us certain emotions responding to right and wrong conduct that lack any obvious basis in individual utility is a useful springboard from which to clarify the role of emotion in moral judgment. The problem is whether a certain class of moral judgment is “constituted” or “driven by” emotion (Greene, 2008, p. 108) or merely correlated with emotion while being generated by unconscious computations (e.g., Huebner, Dwyer, & Hauser, 2008). With one exception, all (...)
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  9. John Mikhail (2005). Moral Heuristics or Moral Competence? Reflections on Sunstein. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (4):557-558.score: 240.0
    By focusing on mistaken judgments, Sunstein provides a theory of performance errors without a theory of moral competence. Additionally, Sunstein's objections to thought experiments like the footbridge and trolley problems are unsound. Exotic and unfamiliar stimuli are used in theory construction throughout the cognitive sciences, and these problems enable us to uncover the implicit structure of our moral intuitions.
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  10. John Mikhail (2008). Moral Cognition and Computational Theory. In Walter Sinnott-Armstrong (ed.), Moral Psychology Volume 3. MIT Press.score: 240.0
    In this comment on Joshua Greene's essay, The Secret Joke of Kant's Soul, I argue that a notable weakness of Greene's approach to moral psychology is its neglect of computational theory. A central problem moral cognition must solve is to recognize (i.e., compute representations of) the deontic status of human acts and omissions. How do people actually do this? What is the theory which explains their practice?
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  11. John Mikhail, Plucking the Mask of Mystery From its Face: Jurisprudence and H.L.A. Hart.score: 240.0
    Until recently, little was known of H.L.A. Hart’s private life. That has now changed with the publication of Nicola Lacey’s A Life of H.L.A. Hart: The Nightmare and the Noble Dream. Drawing on Hart’s notebooks and correspondence, Lacey paints an illuminating portrait of Hart, which reveals that despite his public success he struggled with internal perplexities, including his sexual orientation, Jewish identity, intellectual insecurity, and unconventional marriage. Yet, as critics have noted, the connection between these revelations and the development of (...)
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  12. John Mikhail (2008). The Poverty of the Moral Stimulus. In Walter Sinnott-Armstrong (ed.), Moral Psychology Volume 1. MIT Press.score: 240.0
    One of the most influential arguments in contemporary philosophy and cognitive science is Chomsky's argument from the poverty of the stimulus. In this response to an essay by Chandra Sripada, I defend an analogous argument from the poverty of the moral stimulus. I argue that Sripada's criticism of moral nativism appears to rest on the mistaken assumption that the learning target in moral cognition consists of a series of simple imperatives, such as "share your toys" or "don't hit other children." (...)
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  13. David Kirkby, Wolfram Hinzen & John Mikhail (2013). Your Theory of the Evolution of Morality Depends Upon Your Theory of Morality. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (1):94-95.score: 240.0
    Baumard et al. attribute to humans a sense of fairness. However, the properties of this sense are so underspecified that the evolutionary account offered is not well-motivated. We contrast this with the framework of Universal Moral Grammar, which has sought a descriptively adequate account of the structure of the moral domain as a precondition for understanding the evolution of morality.
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  14. A. Abou-Zeid, H. Silverman, M. Shehata, M. Shams, M. Elshabrawy, T. Hifnawy, S. A. Rahman, B. Galal, H. Sleem, N. Mikhail & N. Moharram (2010). Collection, Storage and Use of Blood Samples for Future Research: Views of Egyptian Patients Expressed in a Cross-Sectional Survey. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (9):539-547.score: 240.0
    Objective To determine the attitudes of Egyptian patients regarding their participation in research and with the collection, storage and future use of blood samples for research purposes. Design Cross-sectional survey. Study population Adult Egyptian patients (n=600) at rural and urban hospitals and clinics. Results Less than half of the study population (44.3%) felt that informed consent forms should provide research participants the option to have their blood samples stored for future research. Of these participants, 39.9% thought that consent forms should (...)
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  15. John Mikhail (forthcoming). Any Animal Whatever? Harmful Battery and Its Elements as Building Blocks of Moral Cognition. .score: 240.0
    This article argues that the key elements of the prima facie case of harmful battery may form critical building blocks of moral cognition in both humans and nonhuman animals. By contrast, at least some of the rules and representations presupposed by familiar justifications to battery appear to be uniquely human. The article also argues that many famous thought experiments in ethics and many influential experiments in moral psychology rely on harmful battery scenarios without acknowledging this fact or considering its theoretical (...)
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  16. John Mikhail (2012). Moral Grammar and Human Rights. In Ryan Goodman, Derek Jinks & Andrew K. Woods (eds.), Understanding Social Action, Promoting Human Rights. Oup Usa. 160.score: 240.0
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  17. John Mikhail (2013). Churchland , Patricia S . Braintrust: What Neuroscience Tells Us About Morality . Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2011. Pp. 273. $24.95 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Ethics 123 (2):354-356.score: 240.0
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  18. Marc Hauser, Fiery Cushman, Liane Young, R. Kang‐Xing Jin & John Mikhail (2007). A Dissociation Between Moral Judgments and Justifications. Mind and Language 22 (1):1-21.score: 240.0
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  19. M. S. A. Mikhail (2000). Some Observations Concerning Edibles in Late Antique and Early Islamic Egypt. Byzantion 70 (1):105-121.score: 240.0
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  20. Gregory D. Edgecombe (2009). The Ever Enigmatic Ediacarans:The Rise of Animals: Evolution and Diversification of the Kingdom Animalia. Mikhail A. Fedonkin , James G. Gehling , Kathleen Grey , Guy M. Narbonne , and Patricia Vickers-Rich . Johns Hopkins University Press, 2008. 344 Pp., Illus. $75.00 (ISBN 9780801886799 Cloth). [REVIEW] BioScience 59 (6):527-528.score: 215.0
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  21. Brian Walker (1995). John Rawls, Mikhail Bakhtin, and the Praxis of Toleration. Political Theory 23 (1):101-127.score: 140.0
  22. Walker Brian (1995). John Rawls, Mikhail Bakhtin, and the Praxis of Toleration. Political Theory 23 (1).score: 140.0
  23. Evgeni V. Pavlov (2012). Perepiska [Letters], Mikhail Lifschitz and György Lukács, Moscow: Grundrisse, 2011; Pisma V. Dostalu, V. Arslanovu, M. Mikhailovu [Letters to V. Dostal, V. Arslanov, M. Mikhailov], Mikhail Lifschitz, Moscow: Grundrisse, 2011. [REVIEW] Historical Materialism 20 (4):187-198.score: 132.0
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  24. Mark Phelan (2012). Elements of Moral Cognition by John Mikhail. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.score: 120.0
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  25. L. R. Clarke (2003). Mikhail Kuzmin: A Life in Art. By John Malmstad and Nikolay Bogomolov. The European Legacy 8 (5):690-690.score: 120.0
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  26. Martin Goldstern (1999). Peretyat'Kin Mikhail G.. Konechno Aksiomatiziruemye Teorii. Russian Original of the Preceding. Sibirskaya Shkola Algebry I Logiki. Nauchnaya Kniga, Novosibirsk 1997, 322+ Xiv Pp. Drake FR and Singh D.. Intermediate Set Theory. John Wiley & Sons, Chichester, New York, Etc., 1996, X+ 234 Pp. Just Winfried and Weese Martin. Discovering Modern Set Theory. II. Set-Theoretic Tools for Every Mathematician. Graduate Studies in Mathematics, Vol. 18. American Mathematical Society, Providence 1997, Xiii+ 224 Pp. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 64 (4):1830-1832.score: 120.0
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  27. G. Mastroianni (2003). The Principles of Mikhail M. Bakhtin. Giornale Critico Della Filosofia Italiana 23 (1):59-90.score: 120.0
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  28. Ekaterina Velmezova (2008). The Social Semantics of Mikhail Pokrovskij and Nikolaj Marr. Studies in East European Thought 60 (4):349 - 362.score: 48.0
    Criticizing the works of "Western" specialists in semantics, Soviet academician M. M. Pokrovskij (1868-1942) comes to the conclusion that social factors are essential for semantic evolution, while psychological factors constitute an intermediate link between the "external" life of a society and the semantics of the corresponding language. This conception resembles the general explanations of semantic evolution proposed by N. Ja. Marr (1864-1934). Nevertheless, despite a number of common points in the semantic theories of these two researchers, Pokrovskij's attitude towards Marr (...)
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  29. D. M. Khanin (1999). The First Hundred Years of Mikhail Bakhtin. Philosophy and Literature 23 (1):220-223.score: 36.0
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  30. Henry M. Leicester (2006). The Geochemical Ideas of Mikhail Lomonosov. Annals of Science 33 (4):341-350.score: 36.0
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  31. Mikhail Aleksandrovich Lifshit͡s (2011). Pisʹma V. Dostalu, V. Arslanovu, M. Mikhaĭlovu: 1959-1983.score: 36.0
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  32. Marc D. Hauser, Liane Young & Fiery Cushman (2008). Reviving Rawls's Linguistic Analogy: Operative Principles and the Causal Structure of Moral Actions. In Walter Sinnott-Armstrong (ed.), Moral Psychology, Volume 2. MIT Press.score: 24.0
    The thesis we develop in this essay is that all humans are endowed with a moral faculty. The moral faculty enables us to produce moral judgments on the basis of the causes and consequences of actions. As an empirical research program, we follow the framework of modern linguistics.1 The spirit of the argument dates back at least to the economist Adam Smith (1759/1976) who argued for something akin to a moral grammar, and more recently, to the political philosopher John (...)
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  33. Ron Mallon (2008). Reviving Rawls's Linguistic Analogy Inside and Out. In Walter Sinnott-Armstrong (ed.), Moral Psychology, Volume 2.score: 24.0
    Marc Hauser, Liane Young, and Fiery Cushman’s paper is an excellent contribution to a now resurgent attempt (Dwyer, 1999; Harman, 1999; Mikhail, 2000) to explore and understand moral psychology by way of an analogy with Noam Chomsky’s pathbreaking work in linguistics, famously suggested by John Rawls (1971). And anyone who reads their paper ought to be convinced that research into our innate moral endowment is a plausible and worthwhile research program. I thus begin by agreeing that even if (...)
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  34. Emmanuel Chemla, Paul Egré & Philippe Schlenker (2013). Predicting Moral Judgments From Causal Judgments. Philosophical Psychology 28 (1):21-48.score: 24.0
    Several factors have been put forward to explain the variability of moral judgments for superficially analogous moral dilemmas, in particular in the paradigm of trolley cases. In this paper we elaborate on Mikhail's view that (i) causal analysis is at the core of moral judgments and that (ii) causal judgments can be quantified by linguistic methods. According to this model, our moral judgments depend both on utilitarian considerations (whether positive effects outweigh negative effects) and on a representation of the (...)
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  35. Mikhail G. Katz, David M. Schaps & Steven Shnider (2013). Almost Equal: The Method of Adequality From Diophantus to Fermat and Beyond. Perspectives on Science 21 (3):283-324.score: 24.0
    Adequality, or παρισóτης (parisotēs) in the original Greek of Diophantus 1 , is a crucial step in Fermat’s method of finding maxima, minima, tangents, and solving other problems that a modern mathematician would solve using infinitesimal calculus. The method is presented in a series of short articles in Fermat’s collected works (1891, pp. 133–172). The first article, Methodus ad Disquirendam Maximam et Minimam 2 , opens with a summary of an algorithm for finding the maximum or minimum value of an (...)
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  36. Mikhail Epstein & Jeffrey M. Perl (2013). Introduction: Idées Fixes and Fausses Idées Claires. Common Knowledge 19 (2):217-223.score: 24.0
    This essay, coauthored by the editor and a member of the editorial board of Common Knowledge, introduces the fifth installment of the journal's symposium “Fuzzy Studies,” which is about the “consequence of blur.” Beginning with a review of Enlightenment ideas about ideas — especially Descartes's argument that a mind “unclouded and attentive” can be “wholly freed from doubt” (Rules III, 5) — this essay then turns to assess the validity of counter-Enlightenment arguments, mostly Russian but also anglophone and French, against (...)
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  37. Leo A. J. Nagelkerke, Mikhail V. Mina, Tesfaye Wudneh, Ferdinand A. Sibbing & Jan W. M. Osse (forthcoming). In Lake Tana, a Unique Fish Fauna Needs Protection. BioScience.score: 24.0
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  38. Theodor Wiesengrund Adorno, Giorgio Agamben, Louis Althusser, Hannah Arendt, John Langshaw Austin, Gaston Bachelard, Alain Badiou, Mikhail Mikhaylovich Bakhtin, Roland Barthes & Georges Bataille (2006). Names and Terms. In Paul Wake & Simon Malpas (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Critical Theory. Routledge.score: 24.0
  39. Yasha M. Gall & Mikhail B. Konashev (2001). Special Issue in Honour of the Late Mirko D. Grmek-The Discovery of Gramicidin S: The Intellectual Transformation of GF Gause From Biologist to Researcher of Antibiotics and on its Meaning for The. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 23 (1):137-150.score: 24.0
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  40. Péter Nádas, Jeffrey M. Perl, Mikhail Epstein, Galin Tihanov, Clare Cavanagh, László F. Földényi, Erica Johnson Debeljak & Jeffrey C. Isaac (2004). The Disregardable “Second World”. Common Knowledge 10:33-38.score: 24.0
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  41. Shilpi Sinha & Lyudmila Bryzzheva (2012). Embodied Reimagining of Pedagogical Places/Spaces. Educational Studies 48 (4):347-365.score: 24.0
    Students often find themselves disconnected from foundations courses such as Philosophy of Education, citing the abstract nature of some of the ideas studied and a perceived disconnect from practical issues. Moreover, the place/space of the university classroom itself can be seen to contribute to students? disengagement and stunting of their critical capacities. In this article, we present two intertwined narratives. In one strand, we describe our attempt to secure our students? engagement in our course, Introduction to Philosophy of Education, as (...)
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  42. John Tasioulas, Allen Buchanan, Rainer Forst, James Griffin, Mikhail Valdman & Louis‐Philippe Hodgson (2010). 10. Daniel Markovits, A Modern Legal Ethics: Adversary Advocacy in a Democratic Age Daniel Markovits, A Modern Legal Ethics: Adversary Advocacy in a Democratic Age (Pp. 864-869). [REVIEW] Ethics 120 (4).score: 24.0
     
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  43. Ruth Coates (2000). The Early Intellectual Careers of Bakhtin and Herzen: Towards a Philosophy of the Act. Studies in East European Thought 52 (4):239-257.score: 18.0
    The article explores common ground shared by Alexander Herzen's `Dilettantism in Science' (1843) and Mikhail Bakhtin's `Towards a Philosophy of the Act' (1919) in the context of the Russian intellectual tradition as a whole. The primary aim is to explore in many ways, perhaps, unlikely affinities between two very different writers in the early stage of their careers. The secondary aim is to explore identifiably `Russian' motifs which may be said to call into question conventional typologies of Russian thought (...)
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  44. Mikhail Valdman (2008). Exploitation and Injustice. Social Theory and Practice 34 (4):551--572.score: 12.0
    When is it immoral to take advantage of another person for one's own benefit? For some, such as Ruth Sample, John Roemer, and Will Kymlicka, the answer at least partly depends on whether what one takes advantage of is the fact that this person is, or has been, the victim of injustice. I argue, however, that whether person A wrongly exploits person B is wholly unrelated to whether A takes advantage of the fact that B is, or was, the (...)
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  45. Mikhail Kissine (2011). Misleading Appearances: Searle on Assertion and Meaning. [REVIEW] Erkenntnis 74 (1):115-129.score: 12.0
    John Searle’s philosophy of language contains a notorious tension between a literalist view on the relationship between sentences and their meanings, and what—at the first glance—appears to be a virulent defence of contextualism. Appearances notwithstanding, Searle’s views on background and meaning are closer to literalism than to contextualism. Searle defines assertion in terms of the commitment to the truth of the propositional content. In absence of an independent criterion to delimit the asserted content, such a definition overgenerates—hence Searle’s commitment (...)
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  46. John B. Bender & David E. Wellbery (eds.) (1991). Chronotypes: The Construction of Time. Stanford University Press.score: 12.0
    Time belongs to a handful of categories (like form, symbol, cause) that are genuinely transdisciplinary. Time touches every dimension of our being, every object of our attention - including attention itself. It therefore can belong to no single field of study. Of course, this universalist view of time is not itself universal but rather is a product of the modern age, an age that conceived of itself as the 'new' time. Time has thus gained new importance as a theme of (...)
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  47. George M. Young (2012). The Russian Cosmists: The Esoteric Futurism of Nikolai Fedorov and His Followers. Oxford University Press.score: 12.0
    The spiritual geography of Russian cosmism. General characteristics ; Recent definitions of cosmism -- Forerunners of Russian cosmism. Vasily Nazarovich Karazin (1773-1842) ; Alexander Nikolaevich Radishchev (1749-1802) ; Poets: Mikhail Vasilyevich Lomonosov, (1711-1765) and Gavriila Romanovich Derzhavin (1743-1816) ; Prince Vladimir Fedorovich Odoevsky (1803-1869) ; Aleksander Vasilyevich Sukhovo-Kobylin (1817-1903) -- The Russian philosophical context. Philosophy as a passion ; The destiny of Russia ; Thought as a call for action ; The totalitarian cast of mind -- The religious and (...)
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  48. A. M. Sidorkin (1999). The Fine Art of Sitting on Two Stools: Multicultural Education Between Postmodernism and Critical Theory. Studies in Philosophy and Education 18 (3):143-156.score: 12.0
    The paper examines two philosophical origins of multicultural education -- postmodern philosophy and critical theory. Critical theory is closely connected to grand narrative of liberation, while postmodern tradition rejects such narrative. The ambivalence of fundamental assumptions makes multicultural theory vulnerable to criticism. However, author maintains, this ambivalence can be a strength rather than a weakness of the multicultural theory. Using Mikhail Bakhtin's notion of polyphony, author attempts to show that incompatible theoretical perspectives may productively coexist within framework of dialogical (...)
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  49. Mikhail Epstein (2010). . Common Knowledge 16 (3):367-403.score: 12.0
    In this guest column, Epstein offers “a new sign” that, he argues, resolves difficulties that have arisen in many theories and practices, including linguistics, semiotics, literary theory, poetics, aesthetics, ecology, ecophilology, eco-ethics, metaphysics, theology, psychology, and phenomenology. The new sign, a pair of quotation marks around a blank space, signfies the absence of any sign. Most generally, “ ” relates to the blank space that surrounds and underlies a text; by locating “ ” within the text, the margins are brought (...)
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